Free Markets, Free People

Tiananmen Square 20 Years After

China, despite its economic progress, remains a rigidly totalitarian state that certainly doesn’t wish to be reminded of the pro-democracy rallies 20 years ago, or the bloody government crackdown that ended them:

China blanketed Tiananmen Square with police officers Thursday, determined to prevent any commemoration of the 20th anniversary of a military crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that left hundreds dead.

The government reacted angrily to a mention of the anniversary by Sec. State Hillary Clinton:

“The U.S. action makes groundless accusations against the Chinese government. We express strong dissatisfaction,” a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Qin Gang, told reporters at a regular briefing.

“The party and government have already come to a conclusion on the relevant issue,” he said. “History has shown that the party and government have put China on the proper socialist path that serves the fundamental interests of the Chinese people.”

And to ensure that the people of China have few venues in which to discuss this anniversary, the “fundmental interests of the Chinese people” are being “served” by blocking various internet sites:

Access was blocked to popular Internet services like Twitter, as well as to many university message boards. The home pages of a mini-blogging site and a video-sharing site warned users they would be closed through Saturday for “technical maintenance.

Known activists and dissidents are under close supervision:

One government notice about the need to seek out potential troublemakers apparently slipped onto the Internet by mistake, remaining just long enough to be reported by Agence France-Presse. “Village cadres must visit main persons of interest and place them under thought supervision and control,” read the order to Guishan township, about 870 miles from Beijing.

In a report released Thursday, the rights group Chinese Human Rights Defenders said 65 activists in nine provinces have been subjected to official harassment to keep them from commemorating the anniversary.

Ten have been taken into police custody since late May, the group said. Dozens of others, mostly from Beijing, are either under police guard or have been forced to leave their homes, according to the report.

The mass media has, as expected, cooperated with the state as well:

There was no mention of the day’s significance in Thursday’s Beijing newspapers. The state-run mass-circulation China Daily led with a story about job growth signaling China’s economic recovery.

An interesting counterpoint to the claims that China has become more democratic over the years, and is actually doing a much better job with human rights than it has in the past. The fear of a simple remembrance of government brutality 20 years ago says that’s not at all true. And the government’s concerted effort to wipe that memory away prove it.

~McQ

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12 Responses to Tiananmen Square 20 Years After

  • Village cadres must visit main persons of interest and place them under thought supervision and control,” read the order to Guishan township, about 870 miles from Beijing.

    Thought supervision and control? WOW.  But they own so much of us, we have to kiss their arses…

  • The Tiananmen Square in 1989 along with the Tibetian Riot during the 1959 were both orchestrated, supported, and organized by the United States itself – A bullying entity that had thought the trade of revolution was in it’s grasp. United Stated saw a distorted image of China and falsely believed that the “majority” were repressed individuals eager for revolution thus entrusted the spread of democratic globalization to the young generation of radicals. However, the United States ignored many factors that had made China a single, unified country for thousands of years; The list includes: Uni-Racial make up, Strong cultural ties, Nationalistic Frenzy, and Cultural tradition. Out of over 1 billion (1,000,000,000) people living in China, only 1,000,000 people appeared at Tianamen Square on 1989 (Of whom the Student Riot Leaders were given U.S. Passport and immunity from international border patrol from the United States Government proir to the riot), a revolution of the democratic agenda, sought to remove this… alleged “repressive” communism inorder to free up trades and exploit the asian economy.

     Who were the people being heard? Of course those who yelled the loudest. The rest 1,000,000,000 remained silent, living their own prespect life with little or no interference by the political aspect of China, till this very day. Ever wondered how did this repressive totalitarian government had survived till this day? Because in reality, it is the total opposite.

  • “The party and government have already come to a conclusion on the relevant issue,” he said. “History has shown that the party and government have put China on the proper socialist path that serves the fundamental interests of the Chinese people.”

    What’s he’s saying is that there is a consensus that communism is best for the Chinese people.  And that the debate is over.  Shorter version: we won.
    Gee, sounds kind of familiar, don’t it?

    • yep :)

      • So if the majority of Chinese are happy in their current state of government, and were happy as DI says above, then why would China fear a web-based backlash? If the majority really lies in the happily controlled and supressed, why not leave the minority—the outspoken—to act a fool and embarrass themselves on a global stage?

        There truly is something fishy afoot and it’s clear China is weary of allowing the “minority” communicate with the rest of the world.

        I also found some video about the issue on this site: http://www.newsy.com/videos/newsy_in_depth_report_china_s_internet_maintenance_day

  • My blog today was also about Tiananmen.    In a nutshell, the protests then were not broad based, and most of the emerging middle class preferred to get rich rather than challenge the government.  Thus the protests could be put down without much outrage.   As time goes on, the middle class expands, and a second generation of middle class Chinese are less likely to accept CCP control of the economy and politics.  This means there is an increasingly broad desire for change, even if it isn’t yet visible.   The problems China “put down” in 1989 are not going away.  China will have to deal with reform demands sooner or later.  To effectively share power with the middle class and move towards nascent democracy (gradually) will maintain their economic gains.  If the CCP continues to cling to power, they could set up a collapse that might destroy their gains.