Free Markets, Free People

Still Won’t Say It

ABC News leads the report with this:

Major Nidal Malik Hasan’s military superiors repeatedly ignored or rebuffed his efforts to open criminal prosecutions of soldiers he claimed had confessed to “war crimes” during psychiatric counseling, according to investigative reports circulated among federal law enforcement officials.

The report goes on to account for his last few hours and his activities, and the asserts:

Investigators believe Hasan’s frustration over the failure of the Army to pursue what he regarded as criminal acts by U.S. soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan may have helped to trigger the shootings.

Really? So I wonder why he didn’t go after the soldiers who had allegedly committed the war crimes versus a random lot at a processing center?

The report continues with some pretty damning evidence that not only were there a lot of red flags with this guy, but they seem to have been pretty darn obvious. That doesn’t change the fact that other than some oblique references to his religion, ABC cannot seem to acknowledge that perhaps, at base, it was that which “may have helped trigger the shootings”.

~McQ

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6 Responses to Still Won’t Say It

  • The Army looks worse and worse the more we learn about this case.
    Maybe instead of diversity being the next casualty of this massacre, it should be Hassan’s entire chain of command up to and including the ACoS.

  • I just got tertiary PTSD by proxy from reading that report.  Guess it’s time to go shoot up ABC news…

  • Major Nidal Malik Hasan’s military superiors repeatedly ignored or rebuffed his efforts to open criminal prosecutions of soldiers he claimed had confessed to “war crimes” during psychiatric counseling…

    So much for doctor/patient confidentiality, eh?

    And I’m really wondering whether his superiors “ignored or rebuffed” his calls for war crimes prosecutions because they thought he was crazy, or because what he considered to be “war crimes” were pretty much normal for soldiers fighting a war?

    “They shot people!  They should be prosecuted for war crimes!!!!”

    And perhaps it’s just me, but doesn’t the tone of the report seem to SUPPORT the idea of hauling GI’s up for “war crimes”?  Lefties (which includes MiniTru) seem to have the idea that all our soldiers are psycho killers.  I guess that’s one reason that it’s easy for them to believe that Hasan snapped from just listening to their stories.

  • That idea of opening “war crimes” investigations against US soldiers based on information from the “psychiatric counseling” would be a real boon to PTSD.  In fact, it wold institutionalize it by destroying any semblance of “doctor-patient confidentiality.”
    If the military had acted, they might have started by discharging Hasan, since no soldier in his right (or nearly right) mind would seek counseling from a military psychiatrist who could possibly turn into prosecution witness.
    This does though transform the ridiculous “second-hand PTSD” argument into a “crisis of conscience” argument for the Hasan defenders, but this is supposed to be handled by the professional training of a psychiatrist.  Every psychiatrist knows that often their patients believe that they did something that an examination of the facts shows was not the case.  They may have had part of the truth, but filled in the rest of the “facts” from thie imagination.
    No matter what happens now, Hasan is unfit to be a psychiatrist.

    • Hasan is unfit to be alive, but to upset the hopheads who would view his execution as martyrdom I’ll settle for seeing him rot in a military prison until a  natural death finishes him off without fanfare.

  • He was so gung-ho about preventing war crimes that he committed some of his own.
    To ABC News, that probably sounds shrewd and principled.