Free Markets, Free People

Daily Archives: June 15, 2010

Dale’s Observations For 2010-06-15

How would you like to sequester some of MY carbon? #AlGorePickUpLines #

Hey, baby, I'd like to open up your lockbox. #AlGorePickUpLines #

This Perez Hilton thing is just insane. Doesn't EVERYBODY know the cops get really upset when you show pictures of a 17 year-old's kitty? #

Yet another Obama administration czar, this time to oversee the oil spill. So, what is it that Obama does, exactly? http://bit.ly/a4BVYQ #

I see via @JonHenke that Grover Norquist joined GOProud. That's faaabulous! in reply to JonHenke #

I've been watching that Etheridge video. Jeebus, if that old man had laid his hands on me, he'd have been making his apology from the ER. #

I got the vandalism damage estimate for my truck. $1,044 damage to the passenger door and window. #

Twitter's incapacity tonight is ticking me off. I can only assume it's all the heathen foreigners tweeting about kickball. #

Wow! We just had an earthquake. The whole house shook. We've been having those a lot lately. I'm pretty sure that's not a good thing. #

Really? An "oil recovery czar"?

This is the plan?

President Barack Obama, in his televised speech to the nation Tuesday, will announce the creation of an oil recovery “czar” to oversee progress in siphoning crude from the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, his chief spokesman said.

Speaking on ABC television’s “Good Morning America” program, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said the position is envisioned as “somebody that will be in charge of a recovery plan, putting a recovery plan together…when we get past the cleanup and response phase of this disaster.”

Well let’s see – we’ve had a commission appointed. We’ve seen the administration explore criminal charges against BP. And now, the administration that has been on top of this thing since “day one” is going to appoint “somebody that will be in charge of a recovery plan” and “putting a recovery plan together” 55 freakin’ days in to this!?

Now he’s going to put someone in charge and put a plan together?

Too bad we don’t have a method of voting “no confidence” in this country and calling for new elections. I think this guy would be gone in a New York minute.

~McQ

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Media gets low ratings from public

Rasmussen has a poll out about the public’s perception of the media. The media in question is the old media, both print and broadcast I assume. Many of the numbers don’t come as a particular suprise. For instance, 66% of those surveyed expressed some anger at the media, with 33% saying they were “very angry”.

Only 9% felt no anger at all, a part of the 31% that said they felt little or no anger at the press.

The primary reason for the anger was two-fold. One they felt there was a liberal bias (51%), but more importantly, they felt reporters (who a slight majority believe to be biased) will write stories that help their candidate of choice and (54%) even hide things which might hurt that candidate.

In other words, the majority of the public believes it can’t get unbiased coverage of campaigns.

Nothing particularly new there. But something which did catch my eye was the 55% who think media bias is a bigger problem than campaign contributions.

And this:

Unhappiness with the media comes at a time when many government policies are unpopular with a majority of voters and two-thirds (67%) think the news media has too much influence over the actions of government. Sixty-two percent (62%) say what the media thinks is more important to the average member of Congress than what voters think.

I think the pubic may have a point here. The media’s influence is outsized, especially when compared to what impact it has vs. public opinion. How else does one explain health care reform? If you remember, it was only after the bill was passed that we began to see the analysis emerge from mainstream news orgainzations that began framing the consequences of the bill in a negative light.

Like politicians, the media has dug it’s own hole in the perceptions of the public. I think one of the reasons for the rise of the political blog is the public can get a different slant on the news, and, given most blogs proudly announce their biases, weigh the news with the given bias in mind.

Most blogs don’t play at being objective and many times that can be a refreshing difference, since you can then go to blogs which identify with each ideological side and get their versions of the same policy, event or speech. I think this access and availability to diverse but biased opinion has helped shape the recurring perception that the old media is biased. It sort of points itself out when you read an old media article and see the same sort of reporting on a politically biased blog site while finding another explanation (and sometimes other facts) on an opposing blog.

As has been said many times, perception is reality, and the reality is that most of the public isn’t buying the old media’s claims of objective reporting – and for a good reason.

~McQ

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Remember who has been in charge from "day one"

It is important to note because that’s the claim made by the president and this is the reality of the situation:

From the beginning, the effort has been bedeviled by a lack of preparation, organization, urgency and clear lines of authority among federal, state and local officials, as well as BP. As a result, officials and experts say, the damage to the coastline and wildlife has been worse than it might have been if the response had been faster and orchestrated more effectively.

Also don’t forget that in addition to claiming to be in charge from “day one”, it was claimed that BP was doing what the government told it to do as it pertains to clean up, containment, even “plug[ging] the damn hole”.

And yet the New York Times calls the effort “chaotic”.

The other day, President Obama called the spill an echo of 9/11. Of course that’s preposterous. But it certainly is giving off more than a faint whiff of Katrina smell. At least as it pertains to the preception that the federal response then was slow and fell short of expectations.

We’re almost 60 days into this and the quoted paragraph is describing the scene today. Obama is visiting the Gulf region again and will address the nation on Wednesday night from the Oval office.

My only question is how much blame-shifting and scape-goating with the one in charge from “day one” engage in that night?

~McQ

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