Free Markets, Free People

Daily Archives: June 15, 2011

Henry Kissinger

Every now and then I’ve been given the opportunity to talk with some of our movers and shakers from the past. First it was former SecDef Donald Rumsfeld as he launched his book "Known and Unknown". And through the Rumsfeld office, I’ve been afforded the opportunity to now sit down with former NSA and Sec State Henry Kissinger today as he launches his new book, "On China".

Unfortunately I received the book yesterday and haven’t been able to read it, but as the title suggests, it is all about China – history, politics, foreign relations, etc. Kissinger has apparently been fascinated by the country ever since Richard Nixon sent him to Beijing to help open and better relations between the US and China.

If you have any serious questions about China – since that’s obviously going to be the theme of the coffee klatch arranged for today, I’d welcome them.  I think it will be a fascinating hour or two.  China has always been an enigma to the West, and it is no less so today.  Drop any ideas for q’s in comments and if they’re good, I’ll try to ask them.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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WI Supreme Court reinstates law limiting public union collective bargaining “rights”

At least for now:

Acting with unusual speed, the state Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the reinstatement of Gov. Scott Walker’s controversial plan to end most collective bargaining for tens of thousands of public workers.

The court found that a committee of lawmakers was not subject to the state’s open meetings law, and so did not violate that law when it hastily approved the collective bargaining measure in March and made it possible for the Senate to take it up. In doing so, the Supreme Court overruled a Dane County judge who had halted the legislation, ending one challenge to the law even as new challenges are likely to emerge.

The changes on collective bargaining will take effect once Secretary of State Doug La Follette arranges for official publication of the stalled bill, and the high court said there was now nothing to preclude him from doing that.

This, however, is not the end to law suits against the bill, it’s just one case which has been settled that had stopped implementation of the law in its tracks.  In fact, this finding was more about how the lower court judge had exceeded her authority:

The court ruled that Dane County Circuit Judge Maryann Sumi’s ruling, which had held up implementation of the collective bargaining law, was in the void ab initio, Latin for invalid from the outset.

"The court’s decision …is not affected by the wisdom or lack thereof evidenced in the act," the majority wrote. "Choices about what laws represent wise public policy for the state of Wisconsin are not within the constitutional purview of the courts. The court’s task in the action for original jurisdiction that we have granted is limited to determining whether the Legislature employed a constitutionally violative process in the enactment of the act. We conclude that the Legislature did not violate the Wisconsin Constitution by the process it used."

The court concluded that Sumi exceeded her jurisdiction, "invaded" the Legislature’s constitutional powers and erred in halting the publication and implementation of the collective bargaining law.

So – the law must now be officially published for it to take effect and according to the court, there’s nothing standing in the way of that happening.

I wonder if we’ll be treated to another spectacle of teachers and the like throwing a collective tantrum.  Oh, wait, it’s summer – they’re on vacation.  With no works stoppage available to them to make their point, probably not.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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