Free Markets, Free People

Daily Archives: July 13, 2011

Ratcheting up the scare tactics – Obama says no guarantee Social Security checks will go out Aug. 3

So typical of how politicians tend to treat the serious matters of policy when they want to literally scare up support:

President Obama on Tuesday said he cannot guarantee that retirees will receive their Social Security checks August 3 if Democrats and Republicans in Washington do not reach an agreement on reducing the deficit in the coming weeks.

"I cannot guarantee that those checks go out on August 3rd if we haven’t resolved this issue. Because there may simply not be the money in the coffers to do it," Mr. Obama said in an interview with CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley, according to excerpts released by CBS News.

The Obama administration and many economists have warned of economic catastrophe if the United States does not raise the amount it is legally allowed to borrow by August 2.

If nothing else this should forever kill the nonsense about the “Social Security lockbox”.

This is akin to what you always hear when you talk budget cuts or the like.  It’s is always about cutting police, fire and education services first – not the bureaucrat in some office doing redundant work.  You can’t scare people onto your side without such tactics, apparently.

But American’s aren’t at all convinced that the debt ceiling should be raised according to Gallup.  That means it’s time to scare the old folks again.

Nice.

MJW ADDS: Just to throw some graphic wood on this fire, James Pethokoukis put together a handy little chart to demonstrate what a huge lie Obama is telling, and the Dems and the media are trying to sell:

August revenue versus expenditures

Note that all interest, Social Security, Medicare and defense payments can easily be made, and we are not in manner, shape or form in danger of default.

An excellent breakdown of exactly what budgetary issues we are facing can be found here [HT: Insty].

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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What a difference a percentage point makes

Especially when you’re talking about GDP growth:

The "new normal" is a term coined by the brain trust at the giant bond fund PIMCO. Anthony Crescenzi, a PIMCO vice president, strategist and portfolio manager, is part of that brain trust.

"The difference between 2 percent growth and 3 percent growth is of major importance and has major implications for the entire economy, for financial markets, for the budget," he says. And the heart of the problem is job creation.

Crescenzi and his colleagues argue that the U.S. economy could actually grow 2 percent a year without adding any new jobs. That’s because the productivity of current workers is rising at about 2 percent a year. "In other words a company can produce 2 percent more goods and/or services a year even if it doesn’t increase the number of people it employs," he says.

Smaller Incomes Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, thinks some new jobs would be added in an economy growing 2 percent a year, but far fewer than one growing 3 percent. "In a 3 percent world we’d create roughly 1.6 million jobs a year," he says. But he says that in a 2 percent world, job creation would be less than half — around 700,000 jobs.

Meanwhile, in China, growth hit 9.5%.  So what is China doing, policy wise, that the US isn’t?  Well, for one thing it is encouraging businesses and has established a positive business climate.  Additionally, it isn’t borrowing money to pump into some black hole it calls “stimulus” at a rate faster than we’ve seen in recent history. Etc.

It’s pretty bad when you have to look to China to point out what the US should be doing.   As Henry Kissinger recently said, the Chinese used to think we had the financial side of things pretty much figured out.   Then this mess and resultant stupidity in reaction to it.   The one thing we should have had the inside track on, we didn’t, because we chose to recreate the failed policies of the Hoover/FDR era without a world war to finally pull us out of the mess (or at least I hope that’s the case).

Is this the “new normal” as Crescenzi claims?   PIMCO, btw, is the world’s largest bond fund (almost 2 trillion).  PIMCO also recently announced that it would no longer be buying US debt.

Why?  Because no one is confident the Federal Reserve knows what it is doing:

Some Fed officials at the June meeting also said additional monetary stimulus would be appropriate “if economic growth remained too slow to make satisfactory progress toward reducing the unemployment rate and if inflation returned to relatively low levels after the effects of recent transitory shocks dissipated,” according to the minutes.

Really? 

So they are considering a “QE3”?  Note the change from “last August” to now. 

Last August, when Bernanke signaled in a speech in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, that the Fed would embark on a second round of Treasury bond purchases, employers were cutting jobs, pushing up the unemployment rate to 9.6 percent. The weakness in the economy prompted Bernanke to focus on the possibility of deflation, or a broad-based drop in prices and asset values including homes and stocks.

The economy is in better shape now than in August, though hiring remains “frustratingly slow,” Bernanke said at a June 22 news conference. Employers added 18,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, the fewest in nine months, the government reported last week.

The Fed’s $600 billion Treasury bond-buying program, completed in June, was designed to spur economic growth, employment and consumer spending by lifting stock prices and reducing borrowing costs.

Is the economy in “better shape now than in August”?  I say ‘no’. And so do most of the economic indicators.  Dr. Robert Barro, Paul M Warburg Professor of Economics at Harvard University makes it clear where the current policy is leading:

Turning to quantitative easing, he warned that the US and UK are storing up inflation and that the Bank of England may be too complacent. Although there is no threat to inflation now, he said: "You have to have an exit strategy. Ben Bernanke [chairman of the US Federal Reserve] and [Bank Governor] Mervyn King are aware of this, but I think they are a little over confident about how they can accomplish it. Because you want to have this exit strategy without having a lot of inflation.

"That’s when the inflation would occur. If there’s a recovery and there’s all this liquidity and somehow the central bank has to reverse it."

That’s precisely where this is all headed – somehow at, at some point, the Fed has to wring out all this money it pumped into the economy.  And that stored up inflation is likely to explode during that process – a real economy killer.  Barro is saying he has little confidence in the Fed, deeming them “over confident” in their ability to do that while avoiding letting the inflation dragon out of the cage.

Meanwhile, in Europe …

Yeah, it’s a mess.  And given the propensity of our policy makers to recreate the policies of the Great Depression, I don’t see it getting better any time soon.  So yes, for at least the foreseeable future, the “new normal” may be 9.2% unemployment.  Because there is still no reason or incentive for US businesses to take the chance of expanding and hiring in such an uncertain economic atmosphere.

Until they are much more confident in the policies of this administration and the Federal Reserve, few if any are going to change the status quo.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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