Free Markets, Free People

Debt ceiling deal – – Democrats whine and Republicans moan

Paul Krugman leads the “reaction” brigade with a lament that says cutting government spending while the economy is deeply depressed is a mistake.   I have to say, that is not “unexpected”.   Krugman has been a one-trick-pony ever since this recession/depression began.   Spend, spend, spend – spend more, spend it even if you don’t have it and keep spending until we spend ourselves out of a recession/depression.   For most that simply is counter-intuitive. 

Krugman also does another thing that is not unexpected.   He attempts to blame all of this turbulence on the Republicans while claiming the Democrats got rolled:

It is, of course, a political catastrophe for Democrats, who just a few weeks ago seemed to have Republicans on the run over their plan to dismantle Medicare; now Mr. Obama has thrown all that away. And the damage isn’t over: there will be more choke points where Republicans can threaten to create a crisis unless the president surrenders, and they can now act with the confident expectation that he will.

In the long run, however, Democrats won’t be the only losers. What Republicans have just gotten away with calls our whole system of government into question. After all, how can American democracy work if whichever party is most prepared to be ruthless, to threaten the nation’s economic security, gets to dictate policy? And the answer is, maybe it can’t.

The Republicans called “our whole system of government into question?”   No overstatement there.   Actually I saw it as more as the Republicans calling attention to the fact that this spending spree and expansion of government intrusion is anathema to “our whole system of government” as first envisioned and then founded.   I think what Krugman really means is the GOP has laid claim to the narrative that the current size and cost of government isn’t at all what the founders established and it is time to get back to that vision.

Wow … terrible, huh?

Then there’s the NY Times editorial page.  It too laments the deal.  More so it laments the fact that Republicans used the crisis to push their election promise to cut spending.   Apparently never letting a crisis go to waste only is good for one side.   You have to love the phrasing of the editorial – Democrats apparently held out for a few principles while Republicans were simply political barbarians out to loot, plunder, kill and maim (politically speaking, of course):

For weeks, ever since House Republicans said they would not raise the nation’s debt ceiling without huge spending cuts, Democrats have held out for a few basic principles. There must be new tax revenues in the mix so that the wealthy bear a share of the burden and Medicare cannot be affected.

Those principles were discarded to get a deal that cuts about $2.5 trillion from the deficit over a decade. The first $900 billion to a trillion will come directly from domestic discretionary programs (about a third of it from the Pentagon) and will include no new revenues. The next $1.5 trillion will be determined by a “supercommittee” of 12 lawmakers that could recommend revenues, but is unlikely to do so since half its members will be Republicans.

The only somewhat good thing that came out of it, says the NYT, is the ability to continue to spend on entitlements even though we can’t afford them.  And note too, the NYT is certainly not for any sort of a balanced budget.   And trying to make government smaller, less intrusive, less costly and to have  to live within its means makes the Speaker of the House and the rest of the GOPers who committed to all of that “radicals”.  Goodness, if that’s how a radical is now defined, count me in.:

Democrats won a provision drawn from automatic-cut mechanisms in previous decades that exempts low-income entitlement programs. There is no requirement that a balanced-budget amendment pass Congress. There will be no second hostage-taking on the debt ceiling in a few months, as Speaker John Boehner and his band of radicals originally demanded. Democratic negotiators decided that the automatic cut system, as bad as it is, was less of a threat to the economy than another default crisis, and many are counting on future Congresses to undo its arbitrary butchering.

Sadly, in a political environment laced with lunacy, that calculation is probably correct. Some Republicans in the House were inviting a default, hoping that an economic earthquake would shake Washington and the Obama administration beyond recognition. Democrats were right to fear the effects of a default and the impact of a new recession on all Americans.

Well of course they were since they were primarily responsible for doubling the national debt in a few years and adding trillions upon trillions of dollars to it.   It is they who ran it up against the debt ceiling in record time and now they want to claim that the GOP held the country hostage instead of letting them again have their way with spending money in the trillions of dollars that we don’t have?   Balderdash.

Meanwhile, here is how some Democrats reacted:

* Representative Emanuel Cleaver, Democrat of Missouri: “If I were a Republican, this is a night to party,” he said to MSNBC.

* Representative Raul Grijalva, Democrat of Arizona: “This deal trades people’s livelihoods for the votes of a few unappeasable right-wing radicals, and I will not support it. This deal weakens the Democratic Party as badly as it weakens the country,” he added. “We have given much and received nothing in return. The lesson today is that Republicans can hold their breath long enough to get what they want.”

* Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the Democratic leader: “I look forward to reviewing the legislation with my caucus to see what level of support we can provide.”

* Donna Brazille, Democratic strategist, via Twitter: “Fellow citizens, good night. The debate was one sided – so no winners, no losers. Claim your JOY! No whining because we’re in this together.”

“The GOP won the debate by playing quick & loose w/the truth. Bullyingeveryone, incl media. Stonewalling. Arrogance. This was unnecessary.”

* Robert Reich, former secretary of labor under Bill Clinton, via Twitter: “The heinous deal is preferable to economic catastrophe. The outrage and shame is it has come to this choice.”

“The radical right has won a huge tactical and strategic victory. Democrats have proven they have no tactics and no strategy.”

“It is not the case that ‘both sides’ gave up ’sacred cows.’ Rs linked the debt ceiling to their demand for smaller govt. They’ve got it.”

Got that folks – the “radical right” linked the debt ceiling increase to a demand for smaller government and got it.  Isn’t that what they’d said they’d do?   Had something like that have occurred on the left, of course, it wouldn’t have been “radical” and people like Reich would be calling it brilliant politics.   Of course in this hyper-partisan atmosphere it mostly comes down to whose ox is being gored to understand which side is the radicals are on and which side has the brilliant politicians (well, at least situationaly brilliant).

Some Republican reactions:

* Representative Allen West of Florida: “At this time I believe this is a good plan for the American people.”

* Jon Huntsman, former governor of Utah and presidential candidate: “While some of my opponents ducked the debate entirely, others would have allowed the nation to slide into default and President Obama refused to offer any plan, I have been proud to stand with congressional Republicans working for these needed and historic cuts. A debt crisis like this is a time for leadership, not a time for waiting to see which way the political winds blow.”

* Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, a presidential candidate: “Throughout this process the President has failed to lead and failed to provide a plan. The ‘deal’ he announced spends too much and doesn’t cut enough. This isn’t the deal the American people ‘preferred’ either, Mr. President. Someone has to say no. I will.”

* Representative Connie Mack, Republican of Florida, On MCNBC: “I don’t think the American people are looking for a deal or a compromise, they are looking for a solution to the problem. At the end of the day, I can’t vote for something that is going to ensure that we have over $17 trillion in debt.”

So, reading most of this, it would appear we can safely conclude no one is satisfied with the deal although given the spin coming from both sides, that most think the GOP got most of what it wanted.  OK.   And the Democrats are supposedly willing, at least for the most part, to sign on.

That’s “compromise” in today’s politics isn’t it?   After all, when the “health care crisis” was upon us a little while back, Democrats certainly weren’t at all concerned with compromise or, for that matter, Republicans in general.   Now they have to deal with the pesky bastards and their radical brethren and suddenly life is no longer good or simple.

Tsk, tsk (cue world’s smallest violin).

Oh, and I did love this, speaking of trying out a narrative:

The White House is straining to make the case that they’re playing a long-game. David Axelrod: “In the short term, everyone suffers politically. In the long term, I think the Republicans have done terrible damage to their brand. Because now they’re thoroughly defined by their most strident voices.”

Is that right, Mr. Axelrod?  Well this little debacle has also “thoroughly defined” the Democrats and the President, and in a most unflattering light.   Spendthrifts with no problem whatsoever in piling mountains of debt on future generations being “led” by an empty suit.   Yeah, it’s really hurt the Republican brand to actually try to stand up for the principles they were sent to DC to uphold.   They won’t be judged as Axlerod would hope they’ll be judged, but instead on how effective they were in accomplishing those principles

 

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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10 Responses to Debt ceiling deal – – Democrats whine and Republicans moan

  • Budgetary sanity is “strident” “extremism”…!?!?!?
    Funny, but middle America won’t buy that, and neither will the legislators of the states.
     

  • I believe that the dems wont go through with the 2nd part.  Let the automatic cuts go into Medicare and Defense and then blame the republicans for it.  The MSM will be fully complacent.

    • “The MSM will be fully complacent.”
       
      Since no one batted an eye when Harry Reid proclaimed before ever seeing what was coming out of the House that the Senate would veto it….but….the Republicans are obstructionists trying to destroy the country with a debt crisis.
       
      And the idea of cutting Spending!  My God!  Those Republicans radicals!  They want to destroy the whole country, no THE WHOLE WORLD!
       
      Hardly an eye blink out of the media.  Message delivered as received and repeated 20 times a day.

  • “We have negotiated with terrorists,” an angry Doyle said, according to sources in the room. “This small group of terrorists have made it impossible to spend any money.”

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0811/60421.html#ixzz1ToMhTCci

    Seriously, how can you negotiate with an asshat who’s rhetoric proclaims the government isn’t allowed to spend money because some people wanted to reduce spending.  Talk about Reductio ad absurdum.

    There’s a sample of Erb’s Compromise.

    • It’s those ‘orrable, ‘orrable Hobbits-es…with their nasty ropes that burns us, Precious…
      Terrorists they are…yes.  Kills them all…  Yes, Precious…
      Won’t let us spends other people’s money, they won’t…  Nasty, mean Hobbits-es…

    • Gotta love the new civility…..

    • Time for another corollary to Godwin’s Law (and I presume it has been done, so I’ll invoke it)
       
      Reductio Ad Terroristis

  • After all, how can American democracy work if whichever party is most prepared to be ruthless, to threaten the nation’s economic security, gets to dictate policy? And the answer is, maybe it can’t.]

    >>>  Ah….the Tea Party as terrorists meme again.

    I’ll simply note that the spend what we don’t have brigade is the REAL threat to our economic security

  • I suppose that this is a case of setting up the meme: “Bad things happened because those tea party extremists foisted a bad deal on us!”

    It’s rather clever, actually: if things work out, nobody will remember the naysayers.  If things DON’T work out (i.e. we continue to accumulate ruinous debt and we’re back in the same fix in six months, i.e. exactly what most of us predict), then they’ve already set up the fall guy.

    On a related note, I suspect that Mrs. Boehner doesn’t let John out by himself, lest he come home having mortgaged the house, cashed out their retirement savings, and raided the kids’ college funds to buy a historic landmark in Brooklyn.  “But, honey, it was a GREAT deal!”

  • /sarc
    Thankfully, the “adults” no longer have a monopoly.
    /off