Free Markets, Free People

So, what do you think?

I find this observation by Joel Kotkin to be interesting:

Generational politics pose both risks and rewards for each party. A Trump candidacy may excite older voters and many younger white voters, but the cost among a pro-immigrant, heavily minority millennial voting bloc could prove damaging over the longer run.

Democrats, too, face risks, particularly if they continue on the path of radical wealth redistribution and draconian climate change regulation. Although still strong, support for Obama has been steadily weakening since 2008. Millennials are the only age group to still approve of President Obama’s record, but by only 49 percent, not exactly a ringing endorsement.

The future may be determined by the extent that millennials feel that Democratic policies inhibit their ability to move up economically. Younger millennials, having grown up during a weak economy under a progressive president, are notably more conservative than older ones, notes a recent Harvard study.

They increasingly share some attitudes with conservatives, having become notably more deeply distrustful of many of the nation’s political institutions. Nearly half describe themselves as independents, far more than any other age group.

To be sure, mllennials will likely stay more liberal than boomers (about as many are conservative as liberal), but they could shift further to the right once they enter their 30s and start earning a living.

Independent is a pretty flexible label and hides a lot of biases that might otherwise put them solidly in one camp or the other.  But the realities of life do indeed have a tendency to temper idealism.  As you grow older, you realize how little your priorities for what you earn matter to government.  You are simply a cash cow to them and they’ll use force to make you pay your “fair share” … as defined by them.

When you begin to get into your career and raise a family, and watch as your priorities in life become second to the government’s you have a sort of epiphany.  Most, at least, begin to pay a little more attention to what is happening via government and begin to drop the youthful silliness that marks their adolescent and college years (colleges are incubators of silly ideas … see past 7 years).   You begin to see government for what it really is … a “legalized” and ever expanding protection racket.  Something that, if Paulie ran it in the neighborhood, would be illegal because it would be considered extortion.  But then, if you disagree with government and refuse to pay the protection money, what happens?

These are the things … just some among many … that begin to dawn on people as they get older.  And it usually pushes those with the ability to reason, to the more fiscally conservative, smaller less costly side.

Of course, some never get it, and they’re the type that elected this idiot in the White House and will vote for Hillary Clinton (or Bernie Sanders and then Hillary Clinton).

They will never understand that there is nothing free in the world, most of the problems we are “scared” with originate with government (and that government is NOT the answer) and simply have no problem with their freedom being limited if it is limited by the “right people”.

However, as you read this blurb, you see something that should clue you into why we’re in this shape.  And it isn’t millennials.  It’s boomers.  They defy the point I’m trying to make (“about as many are conservative as liberal”) with about half remaining in fantasy land.  Of course, they also lived in the golden age of the US in terms of total wealth.

So I dispute the belief expressed by the author that millennials will “likely stay more liberal than boomers.”  Perhaps socially, as in social issues.  But in pocket book issues, they’re hardly found the living easy.  And the big government help they were told was so necessary and good isn’t at all panning out like promised.

Is there any wonder the Democrats are insistent on importing new voters, legally or not?

But are millennials “game changers” like Kotkin contends?

Frankly I don’t really see any generation as “game changers” at the moment.  But you may disagree.

~McQ

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8 Responses to So, what do you think?

  • The problem with millennials is that not only do they know little about history (the context required to think like an American), they are without the means to access their own experience. Without the concepts to see themselves as unique individuals in a grand tradition, they live in the shadows of political correctness, pre-judged as victim or victimizer. Everything the Bolsheviks flash at them sets off one state or the other. So the millennials might look like normal people, they walk around like normal people and have normal needs and desires, but poke them just a little bit on politics and the hypnotic program just pours out of them. And in this regard some of that program is in its third generation, cut off conceptually from anything resembling a coherent American understanding of America’s place in history. Without that, they have no idea who they are or what their legacy is and will simply be whatever their programmers want them to be.

  • I loved how when my kids went to college, they were “entitled” to nothing except a Stafford load at 6.4% (after they graduate).
    I can remember years ago, my credit card company virtually apologizing for setting card rates to 2% above the Federal Reserve overnight rate.
    That makes 6.4% seem like usury, given the current Federal Reserve rate (of just above 0%).

  • Recently I have had the pleasure of starting salary payments for a couple of part-timers who are older teenagers. The reactions (heard via the parents) on reading their first pay slips were… “where has all the money gone???”. Tax baby, to pay your nice free shit. Still not sure if it is much of an awakening, since they really pay very little tax compared to most.

  • Kotkin’s openning reinforces a racist stereotype of conservatives, screw him.

    I expected the shift, is alternating generation. The D’bags of the 60’s&70’s (especially the 70’s) kids are the original millennials in full swing. the tail end of that will be the kids of people who grew up to a social/political awareness of the 80’s who were pretty cynical of the BS from the two earlier decades.

    Its a swing of the generational pendulum likely softened by intense media and educational propaganda if they don’t have anything else to look to. And I don’t see it in the Republican Establishment. The time is almost perfect for the formation of a third party to give that generation an option. But both Establishment R’s & the Democrats and the Media will likely snuff that. Look to the Media to start getting panicky as they lose momentum with the upcoming generation .

  • Kotkin’s opening reinforces a racist stereotype of conservatives, screw him.

    I expected the shift, is alternating generation. The D’bags of the 60’s&70’s (especially the 70’s) kids are the original millennials in full swing. the tail end of that will be the kids of people who grew up to a social/political awareness of the 80’s who were pretty cynical of the BS from the two earlier decades.

    Its a swing of the generational pendulum likely softened by intense media and educational propaganda if they don’t have anything else to look to. And I don’t see it in the Republican Establishment. The time is almost perfect for the formation of a third party to give that generation an option. But both Establishment R’s & the Democrats and the Media will likely snuff that. Look to the Media to start getting panicky as they lose momentum with the upcoming generation .

  • I think what you are describing here is what has perplexed (big L) Libertarians for… ever. Socially liberal and fiscally conservative has no home in either party. So how do they split? I’ll wager it is just a matter of priorities. Those that see social liberal issues as being more important end up with the Democrats even if it is hypocritical much of the time. Fiscal conservatives tend towards the GOP with a raging dose of hypocrisy.
    One would think the Libertarian Party would excel with this group yet they’re still stuck in the 5% range.

  • Define “pro-immigrant”. I work for a large university, I work with many hundreds of recent immigrants.
    The legal immigrants I talk to, have spent a lot of time and money to come here and assimilate.
    The very LAST thing they want to see is amnesty. It’s cheating, it’s cutting the line, it’s spitting in their faces.
    “pro-immigrant”, in this case sounds more like pro-Crimalien.
    Joel must think we are all retarded. What a dink.
    I would pay to see him posit this schegma to a recent ‘legal’ immigrant, just for the entertainment value alone.

  • Frankly I’m a bit dismayed that Kotkin has a generation running loose out there who aren’t earning a living until they’re in their freaking 30’s!!!!!!

    Show of hands – how many here were married with kids before they were 30?
    How many were getting their first mortgage or already paying on it?

    Good lord. Since we work so hard to treat them like children (mommy and daddies insurance until you’re 26!) we ought not be surprised if they continue to act like it.
    They obviously don’t have enough skin in the game if they’re not expected to earn a living until they’re in their 30s.