Free Markets, Free People

Stray Voltage

I’ve been having internet access problems this week and am awaiting a new router from my provider.  It is supposed to be here today, but the day continues to pass.  Ah, well, such is life.

Speaking of life, I noticed the other day that mention of David Duke and the KKK bobbed to the surface of the media cess pool.  No mention of this that I can find, however:

A prominent leader in the Ku Klux Klan said the group is officially endorsing Hillary Clinton for president and has already donated $20,000 to her campaign.

Klan leader Will Quigg told Vocativ over the weekend, “For the KKK, Clinton is our choice,” adding, “She is friends with the Klan,” Quigg said. “A lot of people don’t realize that. She’s friends with [the late] Senator [Robert] Byrd. He’s been an Exulted Cyclops in the Klan. He’s been King Kleagle.”

The West Virginia senator was the leader of his state’s Klan chapter in the 1940s, according to Vocativ. In 2005, he publicly disavowed his involvement in the KKK, saying it was wrong. Upon his death in 2010, Clinton described Byrd as a “friend and mentor.” Byrd was among the longest serving senators in the body’s history, holding his seat continuously from 1959 until his passing.

Indeed.  And, in fact, he sets the record straight about the Klan:

As for Clinton, “All the stuff she’s saying now, she’s saying so she can get into office, okay? She doesn’t care about illegal immigrants—she’s acting like she does so she can get into office. Once she’s in office, then she’ll implement her policies. She’s a Democrat. The Klan has always been a Democratic organization,” Quigg said.

It certainly has.

John Cleese of Monty Python fame lets us in on his opinion concerning political correctness.  He’s not a fan:

And that’s why I’ve been warned recently, don’t go to most university campuses because the political correctness has been taken from being a good idea — which is, let’s not be mean particularly to people who are not able to look after themselves very well, that’s a good idea — to the point where any kind of criticism of any individual or group can be labelled cruel.

And the whole point about humor, the whole point about comedy — and believe you me, I’ve thought about it — is that all comedy is critical. Even if you make a very inclusive joke — like, “How do you make God laugh? Tell him your plans” — that’s about the human condition, it’s not excluding anyone, it’s saying we all have all these plans that probably won’t come and isn’t it funny that we still believe they’re going to happen. So that’s a very inclusive joke, but it’s still critical.

All humor is critical. If we start saying, “oh, we mustn’t criticize or offend them,” then humor is gone, and with humor goes a sense of proportion, and then, as far as I’m concerned, you’re living in 1984.

Welcome to “1984”, John.

John McCain:

“If Donald Trump is at the top of the ticket, here in Arizona, with over 30 percent of the vote being the Hispanic vote, no doubt that this may be the race of my life,” McCain said, according to a recording of the event obtained by POLITICO. “If you listen or watch Hispanic media in the state and in the country, you will see that it is all anti-Trump. The Hispanic community is roused and angry in a way that I’ve never seen in 30 years.”

Translation: “If Trump’s the nominee, I’m screwed.”

The one and only good reason I’ve found so far for Trump to be the GOP’s nominee.

The meddling of government in the health insurance business is having the predicted results.  Insurers are now considering dropping the “bronze” coverage plans … you know the one’s with the lowest payments and the highest deductibles?  Guess who buys those?  Right … the young and healthy because government has, by force of law, required them to be insured.  So if the bronze plans go the way of the former “if you like your plan, you can keep your plan” plans, what is then predictable?

If insurers do drop their bronze plans, it would have the effect of further destabilizing the marketplace, according to Sean Mullin, a senior director at Leavitt Partners. That’s because such enrollees, which tend to be lower-risk and want the cheapest plans, will likely leave the marketplace altogether, further depleting the exchanges’ share of healthier enrollees.

Because, you see, the fine will be cheaper than the available “silver” plans.

Brilliant.  Great job, Bammy.

Speaking of predicted, here’s another one:

Entry-level McDonald’s jobs will go to self-service kiosks rather than to humans under a $15 minimum wage, a former chief of the fast-food giant has warned.

In a guest article written on the Forbes site, former McDonald’s USA CEO Ed Rensi wrote that instituting a $15 minimum wage would mean “wiping out thousands of entry-level opportunities for people without many other options.”

Arguing that McDonald’s franchisees would not be able to absorb the additional labor costs that would come with a minimum wage of $15, Rensi suggested that the restaurant instead would turn to self-service kiosks to replace some employees. Customers don’t mind the kiosks and they have been successfully implemented in Europe, he said.

Watch the idiots who haven’t a clue about what are called the laws of economic blow a gasket when they discover that math too has laws, and $15 times 0 hours equals … $0.

Ah well, such is life.  Got my new router in while doing this and it makes all the difference in the world.  In fact, the speed test says I’m getting double the mps I was getting before.

At least for a moment, life is good!

Have a great weekend!

~McQ

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5 Responses to Stray Voltage

  • The John Cleese bit is a meme on Facebook. I’ve done my part to share it. Luckily the push back against threats to free speech is much stronger than those small clicks of extremists who have disrupted a few campuses with weak administrators. As much as we disagree about politics, free speech, especially at campuses, for conservatives as much as liberals, nationalists as much as radicals, has to be protected. Or what I tell my kids: “No, there are no ‘bad words.’ Words are just words. How people respond to them is there own choice. But we’re in a world where people get upset and offended by lots of words, especially the f-word. I won’t get mad at you for using it, but if it becomes a habit you’ll have problems. On the flip side, don’t be bothered by words other people use against you. It’s just words. Why give someone who would want to call you names power over your emotions?”

    • The problem in Europe is the ‘Right’ is dropped in the same box as actual genetic supremacist politicians. And after the crisis is over the public will be guilted into no longer supporting them.

  • Translation: “If Trump’s the nominee, I’m screwed.”

    The one and only good reason I’ve found so far for Trump to be the GOP’s nominee.
    There is a more compelling reason. But first, I campaigned for McCain in 2000. I viewed Bush as the spoiled frat boy that he was… he found his pair after 911. Hugh Hewitt best described my transformed opinion of John McCain in 2008 – he is a great American, but a lousy politician.

    As for the reason to support Trump; a national media that so willingly tongue-baths Democrats would be once again willing to look into governmental malfeasance.

  • A Harvard law professor has called for liberals to begin treating like Nazis those who subscribe to Christian or conservative beliefs.

    In a Friday blog post at Balkinization, Mark Tushnet said conservatives and Christians have lost the culture wars, and now the question is “how to deal with the losers.”

    “My own judgment is that taking a hard line (‘You lost, live with it’) is better than trying to accommodate the losers,” he wrote.

    “Trying to be nice to the losers didn’t work well after the Civil War, nor after Brown,” Mr. Tushnet wrote, citing the Supreme Court case on segregation. “And taking a hard line seemed to work reasonably well in Germany and Japan after 1945.”

    Mr. Tushnet said liberals should stop being so hesitant to advance their agenda through the judiciary, saying a majority of federal judges have been appointed by Democratic presidents, and they need not worry “reversal by the Supreme Court” now that former Associate Justice Antonin Scalia is dead.