Free Markets, Free People

Daily Archives: April 10, 2009


What’s so wrong with free-lance wealth redistribution?

As a counterpoint to McQ’s post on the pirate incident, a humorist endeavors to predict the Obama administration’s response:

For too long, America has been too dismissive of the proud culture and invaluable contributions of the Pirate Community. Whether it is their pioneering work with prosthetics, husbandry of tropical birds or fanciful fashion sense, America owes a deep debt to Pirates.

The past eight years have shown a failure to appreciate the historic role of these noble seafarers. Instead of celebrating their entreprenuerial spirit and seeking to partner with them to meet common challenges, there have been times where America has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive.

Finally, to all pirates listening to international broadcasts, shortwave services and ship-to-shore radio, let me say this:

Ahoy, me regret arr relationship has set sail in a scurvy manner. Arr people share many mutual ‘alues and concerns on t’ raging main. Perchance, could ye handsomely release the cap’n o’ the ship and I assure that no harm will come t’ ye or ye hearties.

Well, it’s no sillier than thinking you can solve a problem created by too much debt by going a whole lot further in debt.


Health Care Reform And The Free Market

Ramesh Ponnuru writes one of the better op/eds discussing the push for “universal health care” I’ve seen.

The practical case is that uninsured people raise premiums for everyone else. But such cost shifting raises premiums by 1.7 percent at most, according to a 2008 study published in the journal Health Affairs. Reforms that increase the number of people with health insurance, while stopping short of universal coverage, would presumably make that small percentage even smaller.

The obvious way to take care of that is to directly insure that relatively small group instead of messing with the entire system.

What about portability and pre-existing conditions? As we’ve been saying here, for literally years, remove it from being employer based and you’ve taken care of both as long as a person keeps their payments current. And, to make it more affordable, remove state mandates. Ponnuru says precisely the same thing:

An alternative approach would be to make it easier for people to buy insurance that isn’t tied to their employment. The existing tax break for employer-provided insurance could be replaced with a tax credit that applies to insurance purchased either inside or outside the workplace. At the same time, state mandates that require insurers to cover certain conditions, which make it expensive to offer individual policies, could be removed.

More importantly, it is a free-market approach. As Ponnuru says:

These two reforms would address most people’s anxieties about the health care system. Insurance would be more affordable, especially for people who cannot get it through an employer, so the number of people with insurance would rise. Indeed, this would enable more than 20 million more Americans to get insurance, according to a model created by Steve Parente, a health economist at the University of Minnesota.

More important, people would own their insurance policies and thus be able to take them from job to job. They would no longer need to worry about losing their job and their insurance at the same time, or feel they need to stay with a job they dislike because they need the benefits.

There it is, the same solution we’ve been pushing at QandO pretty much since QandO has existed. It is a common sense solution which actually reduces government’s role, gives people choices and makes coverage more affordable for a larger number of people, portable and negates the concern for “pre-existing” conditions.

Which is precisely why government will reject such a remedy.

~McQ


Bowing, Boasting And Bloviating

I‘ve pretty much avoided mention of the bowing incident – it’s a distraction from the more serious things going on. But then the White House says we shouldn’t believe what we saw and throws out a couple of the most ridiculous reasons for what the President did that I’ve heard (an “unnamed” White House source claims it was either an adjustment for a short king or he lost a contact – take your pick). My question? Why is the White House bringing this back up? It makes no sense.

Then there’s Joe Biden’s claim of lecturing George Bush. When will this guy figure out that such claims can be checked? There’s not a moment of a president’s tenure that isn’t recorded by someone. Yet Biden seems to think, for he can make stuff up to retroactively bolster his arguments and make himself seem both wise and prescient.

He’s neither. He’s a blowhard who’s rise to the position he’s in was based mostly on his perceived ability to cover a glaring weakness in foreign policy experience from which Barack Obama suffered. But he was not a guy who anyone in the previous administration sought out for advice or council on much of anything.

However both of these incidents are troubling. The first indicates an innate defensiveness within the White House. This is something that should have simply been ignored. It would bang around on the right side of the political sphere for a while and then fade. But to claim something which you can clearly see for yourself is not what you see is foolish. It erodes credibility. “Don’t believe your lying eyes, believe what we say”.

As for Biden, as Karl Rove said, he’s a serial exaggerator – which is a nice way of saying he’s telling a whopper. Biden has a tendency to make up anecdotes which make him sound good and the other guy look bad. It’s sort of like when you have a “I wish I’d have said that” moment. You didn’t say it, but had you said it, it would have been perfect for the moment. Biden tries to make those moments real and claim them for himself. Again, it’s a credibility problem. You can’t believe a thing the man says.

For such a media savvy bunch you’d think the White House would know to leave a story such as the bowing incident alone. And you’d think, by now, that Joe Biden would have realized that what he could skate by on as a Senator won’t be overlooked now that he’s the VP – that and the fact that he should know his claim of lecturing a president is fairly easily checked.

Amateur hour.

~McQ

michael kors outlet michael kors handbags outlet michael kors factory outlet