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Daily Archives: January 2, 2010


Ironic Quote Of The Day

For the self-named “reality based community” I sometimes wonder if the left lives in a bubble, or have a selective memory, or just flat don’t remember anything before January 20th, 2009.

In fact, take the word “Republicans” out of this quote and it could have been said of any number of people on the left during the previous 8 years:

The climate right now is that Republicans use everything they can to undermine and delegitimize this president. And it’s actually un-American. It’s traitorous, in my opinion. Do you want to give aid and comfort to our enemies? Continue to treat this president like he wasn’t elected and he doesn’t know what he’s doing! He knows what he did. He knows what he’s doing. I’m proud of him. I believe that he has the stalwart, resolute nature to get this done…

That was Joan Walsh of Salon.com on Hardball. You can watch it here. Obviously she didn’t get Hillary Clinton’s memo about questioning people’s patriotism and she obviously doesn’t know that dissent is, in fact, the highest form of patriotism (a sentiment, btw, with which I agree) according to the left.

Given she apparently believes that this is something new, she’s obviously oblivious to the irony of her own words. Either that or she found the left’s behavior acceptable during the Bush years.

In reality, what she and the rest of the left are going through is the transition from the opposition to the establishment.

Ed Driscoll provides some prime Victor David Hanson quotes to remind the left of how well it acted during its chance to show support for an opposition party president, and how miserably they failed. In fact, it isn’t a stretch at all to say they did “everything they [could] to undermine and delegitimize [that] president”.

Do you remember the uproar this year when someone admitted they hoped Obama would fail? Why that was simply outrageous. But any observer of the left during the last administration knew it was nothing new. Via Driscoll (and another part of the irony of this quote) here is Gary Kamiya writing at – wait for it – Salon.com about President Bush:

I have a confession: I have at times, as the war has unfolded, secretly wished for things to go wrong. Wished for the Iraqis to be more nationalistic, to resist longer. Wished for the Arab world to rise up in rage. Wished for all the things we feared would happen. I’m not alone: A number of serious, intelligent, morally sensitive people who oppose the war have told me they have had identical feelings.Some of this is merely the result of pettiness–ignoble resentment, partisan hackdom, the desire to be proved right and to prove the likes of Rumsfeld wrong, irritation with the sanitizing, myth-making American media. That part of it I feel guilty about, and disavow. But some of it is something trickier: It’s a kind of moral bet-hedging, based on a pessimism not easy to discount, in which one’s head and one’s heart are at odds.

Many antiwar commentators have argued that once the war started, even those who oppose it must now wish for the quickest, least-bloody victory followed by the maximum possible liberation of the Iraqi people. But there is one argument against this: What if you are convinced that an easy victory will ultimately result in a larger moral negative–four more years of Bush, for example, with attendant disastrous policies, or the betrayal of the Palestinians to eternal occupation, or more imperialist meddling in the Middle East or elsewhere?

Wishing for things to go wrong is the logical corollary of the postulate that the better things go for Bush, the worse they will go for America and the rest of the world.

Quite a confession, wouldn’t you say? Apparently in Mr. Kamiya and Ms. Walsh’s world, the “logical corollary of the postulate” is only valid for the ideological left.

So Ms. Walsh, it’s your turn – take a look at what your colleague wrote at your site back before you apparently began paying attention to things like that and, given how you’ve branded the right’s dissent and opposition as “traitorous” and “un-American”, tell us why Mr. Kamiya’s sincere wish for Bush to fail in Iraq isn’t fruit from the very same tree?

~McQ