Free Markets, Free People


Chanting “USA, USA, USA” at a high school game between two American high school teams is now a “racial slur”?

See if you can make sense out of this story … I can’t.

Seems the “right" not to be offended has surfaced again with the usual absurd results.  Unless the “minority students” mentioned weren’t Americans.

And since when has “USA” been a “race”?  Were the “minority students”  Hispanic?  That’s not a race either.

See if you can sort it out. These type stories give me a headache.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

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29 Responses to Chanting “USA, USA, USA” at a high school game between two American high school teams is now a “racial slur”?

  • I consider this good, in the main. Keep flopping that race card, and wear that sucker out.

    I went to high school in San Antonio, and in the late 60s we were LESS race conscious than they appear to be now.

  • The winning school is predominately white, the losing school is minority, and the (non-minority in Texas) minority in question is hispanic (96% hispanic, to be accurate). Given that they’re hispanic (and who gives a damn if they happen to have been descended from the Texians who helped kick Santa Anna back across the Rio Grande) the implication was they were not Americans.
    ————————————————————————
    I get this one.

    • @looker I get what they’re trying to do, but I don’t buy it. Hispanic is not a race, no matter how hard the left tries to define it is such (its a language which black Venezuelans, white Spaniards and Mexicans of Indian decent share). Nor is “Mexican”. So if they’re American citizens, the chant means squat – unless you want to make something absurd out of it (which seems to be the case).

      It is stupid over-reactions like this that make something of nothing because someone chose to be “offended” (apparently the worst thing someone can do to another). Thankfully, stupidity like this demonstrates how bankrupt the race baiters have become.

      • @McQandO Yeah, I saw that after a bit. It’s been an argument I’ve long had with liberal friends that my not wanting Mexicans sneaking across the border has nothing to do with the fact they may not look like me. They CAN look very much like me, depending on where they
        come from in Mexico since, as you note, “Mexican” and even “Hispanic” is NOT a race. So, I stand justly corrected on this one.

      • @McQandO I had a friend during law school who was from Mexico City. Several generations Mexican, and with red hair, freckles, blue eyes, and named O’Sullivan. A lot of Irish boys fought during the Mexican-American war, found nice Catholic girls, and stuck.

        The “offense” was getting whooped in a basketball game.

    • @looker If they’re offended by USA….then they are not Americans. Pretty simple equation really

    • @looker “…the losing school is minority…”

      Not in San Antonio.

      • @myweeklycrime I know, that’s why I wrote “the losing school is minority, and the (non-minority in Texas) minority in question is hispanic” I live up just north of Dallas. The idea of hispanics being a ‘minority’ in Texas is just hilarious to me.

  • Interesting. I’ll bet if they were playing against a Mexican team from across the border, it would be seen as nationalist (and get absolutely no attention) rather than racist. But because it’s against American minorities, it’s somehow racist.

    I’m not sure I get this one either.

    • @warbiany They’re telling the hispanic kids (some of whom probably ARE anchor babies, but surely not all) from across town that they’re not US citizens. Seems pretty straight forward. It’s beyond mere rivalry.
      ———————————————————————————————————
      HOWEVER, here we go with the idea that Mexicans can’t be ‘white’. Mexican isn’t a race, so, now that I see ti from that angle, you’re right, I don’t see it as racist, I see it as tacky.

    • @warbiany I don’t know about Alamo Heights, but many San Antonio schools play sports against Del Rio, which is a border town. Edison HS is less than five miles from Alamo Heights HS. I’m guessing that in the rivalry between these two schools, conflicts are more likely to be about “other side of the tracks” than race or ethnicity.

    • @warbiany If they were playing a Mexican team from across the border as “Team USA” vs. “Team Mexico” or something like that, the USA chant would make sense. Here, it does not.

      I’ve been to a lot of sporting events and I’ve never heard the victorious team chant USA! USA! where both teams were from the United States. The name of the school, the name of the team, yes, but never the USA chant. Ever. Not at college, high school or jr. high events, school or private club games.

      The only time I’ve ever heard this chant is at either a patriotic event or international sporting events such as the Olympics where the USA is actually celebrating “Team USA.”

      So unless you buy into the idea that winning a high school basketball game somehow resulted in a wave of patriotic pride, you have to think that there was another motive to the chant.

      Technically, racism is not the appropriate term, but that’s splitting hairs. Hispanic is not a race, but it is a term that denotes an ethnicity. So ethnicism? Whatever term you use, it’s on the same moral level as racism. A distinction without a meaningful difference.

      Do you really want USA! USA! to be used by one group of Americans as a slur on another?

      • @TomB From what I’ve heard of this on the radio, the chant was done by a handful of students and the coach put a stop to it after just a few seconds. So phrases like “wave of patriotic pride” completely overstate the event. A couple guys thought it would be funny to do a Homer Simpson mindless chant and a few others went along with it. Now it’s a national story?

        • @myweeklycrime I’m not su

        • @myweeklycrime First, I’m not suggesting that it should be (or is) a national story. The link was to a local San Antonio television station, not CNN, so I guess it becomes national when it get posted on blogs such as this one. Apparently, the TV station found it interesting enough to post locally and Bruce found that interesting enough to post here. If it’s national news anywhere else, I haven’t seen it. And, yes, a mountain is being made out of a molehill. Such is the internet.——————————————————————————————————————–
          Now, as to the “wave of patriotic pride.” I wasn’t suggesting that was what happened. First, you are mistaking my use of the term wave as meaning something that spreads through the crowd. I intend it more as a “wave” of pride within an individual. Has nothing to do with the number of people involved. I’m only speaking to the motivation of those who started the chant. The way I see it, there are two possibilities: They were spontaneously possessed of a need to express patriotism or they were using a patriotic chant to suggest that their team was the American team and the other was not. Given the context, I see the lattter to be more likely. Then I guess there is the possibility you suggest–that some idiots felt a need to chant SOMETHING and the only thing they could come up with was a patriotic chant that didn’t really fit in the context of the situation.

        • @TomB I heard about it on WOAI, a San Antonio radio station (also the call letters for the NBC TV station). It surprised me that it was mentioned here on Q&O.

          Out of curiosity, I searched news.google.com and see that it’s on TIME, USAToday, CBS, and many others. It’s a bit surreal.

          In a story I cited previously (http://bit.ly/AFr6pS) a student claimed that the “USA USA” chant was used after other victories, not just against Edison, copying the mindless example of Homer Simpson. If that’s the truth, and not an ex post facto excuse, then it’s a pretty sad indicator of the mindset of these kids that they would so publicly reenact the behavior of a cartoon idiot.

          If it was a bigoted taunt, that’s worse, but I don’t see why it’s news. It wouldn’t have been news if the only bigotry was Edison students saying “Alamo Whites”.

          It shouldn’t have gone beyond the level of a teacher or principle reprimanding students.

        • @TomB I noticed that Megyn Kelly of FNC picked up this story. They had a few seconds, including some guy (Shepard Smith?) ignorantly describing Alamo Heights as an “all white” school.

  • Let’s face it. If Obama loses, everything will be racist.
    But this is necessary to drive the “race card” into the ground.

  • oh god I am tired of this shit.

  • I seldom disagree with you Bruce, but I have to here. Granted the language in the piece is messed up, but I expect that of a media that calls a black man from England “african american.”

    But I do think something ugly is going on here that deserves criticism (though probably not action by the state via the administrators of a state school). Living in a border state that keeps voting Joe Arpaio into office as the last defense against the brown apocalypse, I can easily believe the implication of the chanting students was that the Americans of Hispanic origin are not real Americans.

    Perhaps it is because I just watched this awful FAIR video before I saw this one, but I can honestly think the USA chanting in this case was something ugly – not racism, but a contemptible for of tribalism. Roughly on the order of kids from a rich school chanting “you’l be working for us someday” to the poor school. Not a hanging offense, but certainly one that would inspire discussion and perhaps discipline if my son were involved.

    • @WarrenMeyer Sometime, Warren, you may want to ponder what part of your colon you pulled that load of crap from. Just a thought…

    • @WarrenMeyer “…I can easily believe the implication of the chanting students was that the Americans of Hispanic origin

      are not real Americans.”

      This incident is more about class, politics, and culture than race. Hispanics are a majority in San Antonio, so even in

      the more affluent enclaves like Alamo Heights or in the suburbs, where I went to school in the 70s and 80s, there are a

      large number of students of Mexican ancestry. In my experience, they identify more with their neighbors than with the residents of the barrios–and in many cases they look down on those poor people as backwards and foolishly resistant to cultural assimilation, much in the way that white people look down on poor white hillbillies and rednecks.

      Identity politics in San Antonio add fuel to the fire, too.

      Local radio talk show host Joe “Pags” Pagliarulo has been making some good points about the reporting, such as

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCwekTkc0zs While he does get me hollering at the radio at times (like when he cluelessly

      speaks in admiration of Arpaio), he’s been highlighting how the issue has been poorly represented in the media.

    • @WarrenMeyer “…I can easily believe the implication of the chanting students was that the Americans of Hispanic origin

      are not real Americans.”

      This incident is more about class, politics, and culture than race. Hispanics are a majority in San Antonio, so even in

      the more affluent enclaves like Alamo Heights or in the suburbs, where I went to school in the 70s and 80s, there are a

      large number of students of Mexican ancestry. In my experience, they identify more with their neighbors than with the residents of the barrios–and in many cases they look down on those poor people as backwards and foolishly resistant to cultural assimilation, much in the way that white people look down on poor white hillbillies and rednecks.

      Identity politics in San Antonio add fuel to the fire, too.

      Local radio talk show host Joe “Pags” Pagliarulo has been making some good points about the reporting, such as

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCwekTkc0zs While he does get me hollering at the radio at times (like when he cluelessly

      speaks in admiration of Arpaio), he’s been highlighting how the issue has been poorly represented in the media.

    • @WarrenMeyer We have to disagree sometime Warren, or one of us would be redundant. BTW, to those who don’t know, Warren is of Coyote Blog.

      This sort of stuff just wears me out. High school rivalries are as old as high schools. And chants about the other school have rarely not been disrespectful. As “My Weekly Crime” points out, it was a few students and it was stopped immediately. Then all the “adults” got involved and absurdity ensued.

      While I appreciate your point about discussion and discipline if it had been your son, that’s pretty much the level at which this should have been left.

      But we live in a world in which we kill flies with sledgehammers. Like I said, it just gives me a headache.

  • “See if you can sort it out.”

    Oh, please. You actually think those Alamo Heights fans would have been yelling ‘USA’ if the other team were all blonde, blue-eyed anglos? Unless they yell like that at all their games it was obviously refering to the ethnicity of the other team , and presumably the other school’s student body. It may not have been technically racism but I found it offensive.

    There may not be a right not to be offended but that does not mean that offensive behavior should be ignored. And since when have high school students been given carte blanche to act as they please at official school events?

    • @timactual It wasn’t “those Alamo Heights fans”, but a handful of players, some of whom are Hispanic. No one was given “carte blanche”. The coach made them stop after just a few seconds.

      I read in another article this morning (http://bit.ly/AFr6pS) that Edison students were calling those from Alamo Heights, “Alamo Whites”. Also in that story, a student claims that the “USA USA” chant was “inspired” by Homer Simpson.

      Was there bigotry? I’d say that’s like, at least among a few of the students of each school. But it’s been blown entirely out of proportion and most people discussing it don’t even get the basic facts right.

    • @timactual And now let me throw something out solely for discussion’s sake. Not saying I believe this myself, but could Latinos (especially in that part of the country) have brought this on themselves? Between widespread support for illegal immigration in the community, and so many militant mexican-ancestry peoples in the area, could someone (especially dopey school kids) reasonably come to the conclusion that latinos aren’t really down with the whole America thing based on what they see going on? Again, I don’t believe it, but I wonder how far off the mark that is for some of these kids?