Free Markets, Free People


Making “Failure” A Design Feature

Although he won’t say it that way, it’s essentially the truth about the Obama “stimulus” package (American Recovery And Reinvestment Act) (via Hot Air):

Turns out the $787 billion “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act” (AARA) was not designed for full economic recovery, but rather to “stabilize” the downturn. That’s the word from White House officials today, who held off-camera briefings with reporters on how the AARA is working so far.

“This legislation was designed to cushion the downturn,” said White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs. “That’s why we have always talked about this as one function of economic recovery.”

When pressed about the change in terminology, Gibbs said he was not trying to temper expectations after the fact. “I can probably find 15 or 20 occasions when I said this in the lead up,” Gibbs said, explaining that he had always defined the AARA as part of a “multi-legged stool.”

Of course when we were in such a gawd-awful rush to pass the thing it was sold like this:

That is why I have moved quickly to work with my economic team and leaders of both parties on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan that will immediately jumpstart job creation and long-term growth. …

Jumpstart job creation and long-term growth? That sounds like what a “stimulus” plan should be designed to do. That’s what it promised to do (remember the warning that without the AARA unemployment would go over 8%?).

It is also what it has failed to do.

So, revising history on the fly, it was now never designed to that.

No wonder Amazon is out there deleting Orwell books from Kindle – who needs to read fiction when you have an administration like this.

~McQ

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5 Responses to Making “Failure” A Design Feature

  • Can’t wait for the updates to the US Constitution coming down the pipe.

  • Oh, did you think we said that car gets 35 mph? No, you misunderstood. It’s actually a bit of a gas guzzler. But it has great reliability and resale value. It will be a good investment down the road. That’s why you bought it, don’t you remember? I’m pretty sure we discussed this before the purchase.”

  • Actually the stimulus was not designed at all, and was not intntioned to accomplish anything.  It was simply a wet dream wish list for every Democrat party constituency with their hand out.  Flat out, that was all it was a collasal pay off.

  • Next area of government for President Nobody to mess up … health care.
    “If you like what you’re getting, keep it,” Obama said. “[President] Nobody is forcing you to shift.”

  • Once again, Mr. Orwell:

    The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today’s issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston’s job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a ‘categorical pledge’ were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April.

    George Orwell
    1984

    MiniTru, of course, does its best to assist the White House in convincing us that black is white, good is bad, and up is down.  Witness this from Reuters today:

    White House sees GDP showing signs of progress

    If you read down, the “progress” is that the GDP won’t be contracting as fast as it was in the first quarter of this year.  It’s sort of like telling a man who’s rapidly bleeding to death, “Cheer up!  I think that arterial spurting is really starting to slow down!”