Free Markets, Free People


Honduran Court Says “No” To Restoring Ousted Leader To Power

Honduras continues to refuse to buckle to international pressure to restore constitutionally ousted leader Manuel Zelaya. The latest rejection came from the Honduran Supreme Court:

Honduras’s supreme court has rejected a Costa Rica-brokered deal to restore ousted President Manuel Zelaya to power and ordered his arrest if he returns.

The ruling also affirmed the legitimacy of the government of interim leader Roberto Micheletti.

The move comes on the eve of a planned visit by a delegation from the Organisation of American States (OAS), which backs the Costa Rican proposal.

It is unclear if the court ruling will affect the delegation’s plans.

The court reminded Mr Zelaya that he faces several charges – including crimes against the government, treason, and abuse of power – and would be subject to trial if he re-entered the country.

Citing their own constitution, the court declared Zelaya’s ouster legitimate and Micheletti’s ascension to power as “constitutional succession”.

I know this has been tough sledding for Honduras, but I have to admit a sense of pride in a country which sticks up for its constitution in such a way and refuses to be intimidated by those who would be happy to see it torn up and ignored.

Viva Honduras!

~McQ

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14 Responses to Honduran Court Says “No” To Restoring Ousted Leader To Power

  • Best wishes to the Honduran people, here’s to staying free.

  • God bless them, and God speed. And I wish Americans would freaking pay attention to what’s going on there, maybe we’d find our own Constitutional cajones again if we did.

  • I feel much more respect for the people and especially the leaders of Honduras than I do for my own. That’s depressing.

    • Amen. Sad isn’t it?

    • Ditto. It’s a shame when I feel more pride in the leaders of another country than I do in my own.

      But there’s nothing wrong with being proud of people who struggle for democracy and the rule of law in the face of tyranny, even tyranny cloaked as “international opinion”.

    • Am I wrong in feeling it’s like plucky Britain facing down the Germans after Dunkirk?

      I keep hoping they can hold out till their elections in the fall, and I’m sure part of their strategy is contingent on that. It will be interesting to see if our own new banana Republic government will further relent after a free election takes place in Honduras.

  • They are quite inspiring!

  • Wow, that’s awesome. Good job Honduras. Makes me want to visit.

  • my only hope is that my grandparents compatriots in Cuba are paying attention and rise up to overthrow their oppressors.

  • Great news – it’ll be interesting to see how Obama and Hillary respond to this.

    • They suspended visa service to Honduras. Apparently they couldn’t find anything else that would hit just the right petulant note.

      Amateurs. Pathetic little amateurs.

  • Thanks for your support everyone. It’s good to visit Honduras. Great climate, nice beaches, beautiful mountains. We’ll be looking out for you!

    From Tegucigalpa

  • What? But doesn’t the Honduran supreme court know that Obama has spoken? I mean, who would you trust to know more about the inner workings of Honduras and its constitution – people that have lived there their entire lives, or some big-earred buffoon that made a foolish snap judgment and probably doesn’t even know what continent said country is on?

    ;)

    Good for the people of Honduras. It’s always nice to see people stand up for what is right and just, especially in the face of overwhelming (and in this case, stupid) odds.