Free Markets, Free People


Why Turkey’s change of attitude toward Israel is important and could be ominous

Someone apparently had an extra bowl of Cheerios this morning:

Syrian President Bashar Assad said Israel’s attack on the Gaza aid flotilla has increased the chances of war in the Middle East, in a BBC interview on Wednesday. Assad said that Syria was working to prevent a regional war but he added that there was no chance of a peace deal with the current Israeli administration, which he called a “pyromaniac government”.

The rhetoric keeps ratcheting up as if various Arab factions are trying to talk themselves into testing Israel again. It’s been a while, but the in the past the results have been uniformly bad for the Arab nations.

But there has been a recent change. Turkey is now talking tough as well. And, add in Iran’s attempt to ingratiate itself with the Arab world and suddenly it’s a little different ballgame.

Turkey’s inclusion against Israel in the rhetorical wars now being waged has encouraged many Arab pundits to hail the Turks and Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan as the much awaited “leader” of the movement against Israel. One writer hailed him as “more Arab than the Arabs” while criticizing Arab leaders as too passive.

There have been huge pro-Turkey rallies in Gaza, Beruit and Damascus. Recently, text messages from viewers displayed on Al-Jazeera TV during a June 4th Erdogan speech in Konya, some of which said: “Erdogan, you are king of the Arabs,” and “Son of the sultans, you have restored the glory of the Ottomans.”

Hizbullah considers Erdogan the new rock star of anti-Israeli leadership, and some Gazans are naming their children after him.

What Turkey and Erdogan have apparently managed to do, according to one writer, is bring those who have rejected Hamas and Hizbullah because of their Iranian ties on board in a unified “Islamic” effort to confront Israel:

“Unlike the Palestinians and many Arabs who support Nasrallah, large groups had yearned for a leadership unconnected to Iran or the new jihadi Shi’a… They rejected Hamas and accused the Palestinian jihad movement of being an instrument of Shi’ite Iran. Now Turkey has emerged to compensate for the incapacity of the leaders of the Arab regimes.

“Erdogan [has emerged as a figure] whose portrait can be displayed in homes, on billboards, and on cars. When all is said and done, the integration into the resistance movement of those who [had] hesitated is now being achieved through the gate of Islam.

Turkey seems to have finally rejected the west and put to rest its desire to be a part of it. Although it retains NATO membership, it appears to have no further interest in the EU. Turkey also appears to be again casting its eyes in the direction of its past glory – the Ottoman Empire. Certainly it isn’t pretending it would again rule over all of its former territories, but Turkey seems to feel it could be a major if not the major influence in the area of the Middle East. One sure way to work toward that goal is to take on Israel.

While it publicly claims it is still a secular nation ruled by secular institutions, this latest situation with Israel and Turkey’s reaction are all Islamic and designed to appeal to the Islamic world in general and the people of the Middle East specifically.

This is one of the conflicts that is brewing on the horizon. It is a new twist in a very old situation. But it promises real trouble if not addressed and defused quickly.

Of course, that will take leadership, not apology tours. I’m not sure that the US is up to the job. And I think the reason we’re hearing all this from Turkey now is they sense that is the case.

~McQ

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11 Responses to Why Turkey’s change of attitude toward Israel is important and could be ominous

  • Lay this one (too) on the doorstep of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
    ¬
    His empty suit style is going to end up costing far more than any one could ever have possibly thought.

    • Turkey has been changing for a while. The EU members who were cold to the Turks also did not help. I would not blame Obama and in fact, his Cairo speech might have helped a smidgeon, though his other weaknesses more than make up for that.
      Keep in mind Turkey fought wars with Greece and invaded Cyrprus. Its not as if Turkey did not have conflicts with the West until now.

  • This could be a very hot summer.¬† Bill Whittle at PJTV had an interesting report some days ago.¬† I’ve been inclined to blog about this, but other pressing crap has interceded.¬† That may be about to end…
    I think it fair to say that Obama has done the worst thing a POTUS can do…transmit weakness and ambiguity.¬† That is a formula for stirring up a war.

  • It took the rest of the world all of two years to determine Carter was an empty suit with no backbone and the collective shit began to hit the fan – USSR invading Afganistan, Iran Hostage Crisis, Cuba Exporting Armed Revolt to Africa and Central America, etc.¬†

    Anybody here willing to bet whether Obama makes it to the two year mark?

    (Note:¬† I recall a movie scene where Butch Cassidy, facing a knife fight, tells Sundance “There has to be some way to make a profit here.¬† Bet against me.”¬† Sundance smiles and says “I would but nobody would bet on you!”)

  • While it publicly claims it is still a secular nation ruled by secular institutions, this latest situation with Israel and Turkey‚Äôs reaction are all Islamic and designed to appeal to the Islamic world in general and the people of the Middle East specifically.

    Turkey’s attitude toward Israel is not very far removed from the popular sentiment in Europe.¬† So I hope you aren’t using that as the sole criteria to say Turkey has completely regected the EU.¬†

    but Turkey seems to feel it could be a major if not the major influence in the area of the Middle East.

    It won’t be long before Turkey is at odds¬†with either Iran or one of its proxies if that is the case.¬†

  • What Turkey and Erdogan have apparently managed to do, according to one writer, is bring those who have rejected Hamas and Hizbullah because of their Iranian ties on board in a unified ‚ÄúIslamic‚ÄĚ effort to confront Israel

    >>>> Good. All the subhumans can die together in one fell swoop.

    • Jesus H. Christ – could you stop the “subhuman” comment?

      • I’ve made no secret of how I feel about terrorists and their¬†supporters – but if it bothers you, I will try to cut it down/eliminate it.¬†

        • Upon re-reading, if it were just Hamas and Hezbollah, I would still not appreciate the subhuman comment but understand it a bit more – but the sentence started with “Turkey” which probably includes some people opposed to terrorism. Also, you can be human and completely evil – no need to make it “racial” sounding. Maybe I am too sensitive…

          • “Also, you can be human and completely evil”

            All too sadly true.

            As I said though,¬† I’ll try to keep a check on that comment at any rate, no reason for me not to try to accommodate you or others.