Free Markets, Free People

issues


Obama job approval poll numbers — the downward trend continues

The polls haven’t been kind to any politicians recently.  Congress has netted its worst approval rating ever.  And Barack Obama hasn’t been an exception as the latest Gallup poll on his job approval ratings show.  If he hasn’t figure out “it is the economy, stupid” someone better wake him up. The fact is there is a discernable trend, and that trend for him is down.  To the the numbers:

A new low of 26% of Americans approve of President Barack Obama’s handling of the economy, down 11 percentage points since Gallup last measured it in mid-May and well below his previous low of 35% in November 2010.

Obama earns similarly low approval for his handling of the federal budget deficit (24%) and creating jobs (29%).

Gallup goes on to point out, in relative terms, the President’s foreign policy ratings are fine.

The president fares relatively better on foreign policy matters, with 53% of Americans approving of his handling of terrorism and roughly 4 in 10 approving on foreign affairs and the situation in Afghanistan. Also, 41% approve of Obama on education.

However, the primary issue of the day sees his numbers in the dumps.  And, most importantly, the constituency he most needs, independents, are none to happy with his performance, or lack thereof.

 

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Nothing particularly surprising about the numbers from those identifying with the two major parties.  But that middle column spells big trouble for the incumbent if the primary issues in November of 2012 remains jobs, the economy and the deficit.  And at this point, there’s little to point to which says they won’t still be the top concerns for voters.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO


GOP ginning up new Contract With America?

That’s the word in “Washington Whispers”:

With public and internal polls showing the likelihood of a huge Republican voter swing in the fall, party officials are now testing the need for and the issues that would be included in an election agenda like the 1994 Contract With America.

One of the key findings by party officials quizzing the public so far: Voters would like a list of changes the Republicans would bring if installed as the majority in the House or Senate or both. “There would be a market” for a new contract, says a top official.

The issues and themes will include cutting the deficit, the size of the government, limiting spending, and boosting liberty and the military.  They’re apparently looking outside DC for some ideas (wow … there’s a novel idea). 

Here’s your chance … any suggestions?

~McQ