Free Markets, Free People

Laffer curve


France to impose a 75% tax on "the rich"

The “you didn’t build that” gang’s attempt to get the “rich” to pay what they characterize as their “fair share” in taxes (when in fact in almost every western country they pay more than their fair share) is about to get tested in France:

The call to Vincent Grandil’s Paris law firm began like many others that have rolled in recently. On the line was the well-paid chief executive of one of France’s most profitable companies, and he was feeling nervous.

President François Hollande is vowing to impose a 75 percent tax on the portion of anyone’s income above a million euros ($1.24 million) a year. “Should I be preparing to leave the country?” the executive asked Mr. Grandil.

The question asked by the client is typical of what will happen if such a tax is imposed … anywhere.  If you believe “the rich” are going to lay back and take it, you’re crazy.  They will do what is in their best interest and paying 75% taxes on what they earn isn’t in their best interest.  We’ve often talked about the Laffer curve and how it applies to taxes.  How at some percentage of taxation, revenues will drop and in some cases drop dramatically.

That’s precisely what that client’s question indicates will happen in France with a 75% “rich” tax.

France has a history of punitive taxation which is one reason it no longer is considered much of a economic power:

[T]he proposal is the latest red flag in a country that has long labored under the image of being a difficult place to do business. France has a 33 percent corporate tax rate — the euro zone’s second-highest, after Malta’s 35 percent. That contrasts with the 12.5 percent rate in Ireland, which has deliberately kept a lid on corporate taxes as a lure to businesses.

Businesses don’t have to stay and take France’s coercive tax rates anymore.  There are countries more than happy to accept their businesses and the boost to the economy they bring. 

And, that goes for “le rich” as well.  ‘Leaving the country’, in the case of France, doesn’t necessarily mean moving too far:

“It is a ridiculous proposal, but it’s great for us,” said Jean Dekerchove, the manager of Immobilièr Le Lion, a high-end real estate agency based in Brussels. Calls to his office have picked up in recent months, he said, as wealthy French citizens look to invest or simply move across the border amid worries about the latest tax.

“It’s a huge loss for France because people and businesses come to Belgium and bring their wealth with them,” Mr. Dekerchove said. “But we’re thrilled because they create jobs, they buy houses and spend money — and it’s our economy that profits.”

You’d think, for anyone with an ounce of common sense, this outcome would be obvious.  Apparently not.  And so France will drive off its rich, see revenues in that income bracket drop even while the tax percentage is increased to 75% and attack those who’ve avoided those taxes as “greedy”.  Just watch.

Of course I agree with the words of Dr. Thomas Sowell in that regard:

“I’ve never understood why it is “greed” to keep money you’ve earned, but not greed to take somebody else’s money”.

Yeah … me neither.  Right now, the greediest entities on earth are governments.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO