Free Markets, Free People

medals


US Olympic medal winners face a taxing experience

Are you watching the Olympics?  Did you enjoy the gold medal performances of the US women’s gymnastics team?

It was nice to see them bask in the glory of the fruition of all those years of hard work and sacrifice.  They reached the peak of accomplishment.  They took the gold.  The stories of the athletes were as interesting as the victory.  Years of monetary sacrifice, hard work, dedication and practice.  Families, who moved to avail their daughter of coaching,  who lived from paycheck to paycheck to ensure money was available for their daughter’s training, the hundreds of meets and competitions, etc.

But hey, we all know they “didn’t build that” themselves.  They traveled on roads to their practice sites and meets, used other common infrastructure improvements and now they get to pay the piper.

It’s time for them to pay up for winning those gold medals, and the IRS will ensure they do.

At today’s commodity prices, the value of a gold medal is about $675 according to Americans for Tax Reform.  And the gold medal brings with it $25,000 in prize money.  The IRS will tax them at 35%. 

So for all those years of hard work, sacrifice and performance, our gold medalists will pay the IRS $8,986 for each gold medal they win.  The silver will cost them $5,385 ($15,000 prize money, and $385 for the medal) and bronze $3,502 ($10,000 prize money, $5 for the medal).

Of course they’ll be about the only athletes in the world so treated because you see, the US is one of the few countries in the world that takes it upon itself to tax the world wide earnings of its citizens.

Because, you know, that infrastructure is everywhere and it’s expensive. </sarc>

But I’m sure we’ll hear from our usual apologists for intrusive government trying to spin these taxes as something both necessary and proper.

Just a note to them – most Americans don’t at all agree with the sentiment that they didn’t build what they now have.   But you have to hope the Democrats keep trying to sell that.    Our Olympians and their tax experience make as good a case against that as any I can imagine.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO