Free Markets, Free People

Economy

An example of how government can become an obstacle to economic recovery

I don’t imagine anyone would argue that it is supposed to be like this, however, this is reality in one city in one state and I’d guess that its true in most places to one degree or another.  The place in question?  San Francisco, where a woman wanted to open a simple ice cream shop.

Ms. Pries said it took two years to open the restaurant, due largely to the city’s morass of permits, procedures and approvals required to start a small business. While waiting for permission to operate, she still had to pay rent and other costs, going deeper into debt each passing month without knowing for sure if she would ever be allowed to open.

“It’s just a huge risk,” she said, noting that the financing came from family and friends, not a bank. “At several points you wonder if you should just walk away and take the loss.”

Ms. Pries said she had to endure months of runaround and pay a lawyer to determine whether her location (a former grocery, vacant for years) was eligible to become a restaurant. There were permit fees of $20,000; a demand that she create a detailed map of all existing area businesses (the city didn’t have one); and an $11,000 charge just to turn on the water.

Imagine how many potential business owners would have said “the hell with it” and, if possible, gone elsewhere or shelved the idea completely?  Had that happened in this case, had the woman in question not had the patience of Job and enough money to weather the 2 years in question, 14 full and part-time workers wouldn’t be employed there.

That’s the problem with stories like this – its hard to get a handle on how many businesses have been discouraged by such a permitting and regulation regime, but you have to assume they are plenty.

It should not take two years for a government to say “okay” to a business.  Nor should there be exorbitant fees associated with it.

Thankfully San Francisco has begun to recognize the enormity of its problem and attempt to do something about it.   A little thing called “reality”, in the guise of the headquarters for Twitter, has finally begun to bring some government officials around:

“The city has had the reputation of being a difficult place, and a hostile place, to do business,” said Mark Farrell, the city supervisor who has the most private-sector experience (he still operates a venture capital firm). “We’re changing the dialogue.”

According to Mr. Farrell, a critical shift occurred last year when supervisors approved a tax incentive to keep the headquarters of Twitter, the social network, in the city after the company threatened to move.

But he admitted that such actions were relatively easy compared with reforming the city’s entrenched bureaucracy. “To change the inner workings of government is a longer proposition,” he said.

Christina Olague, a former Planning Commission president who was recently appointed city supervisor, said that planning codes governing businesses had ballooned over the years to become hundreds of pages long. “It’s so convoluted,” she said. “It’s so difficult for these businesses to move ahead.”

But the byzantine, time consuming and costly regulatory process, for the most part, still remains.   Check out this animated video which illustrates how absurd it can be. 

 

 

As we’ve said any number of times here, if government wants to play a role in the economy and the economic recovery, perhaps the best role it can play is, for the most part, to get the hell out of the way.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

Economic Statistics for 9 Feb 12

Today’s economic statistical releases:

Initial claims for unemployment fell 15,000 last week to 358,000, while the 4-week average dropped 11,000 to 366,250. This is strongly positive for job growth. Or it means that, after losing 7 million jobs since 2007, we’ve pretty much fired everyone who can usefully be fired.

The Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index rose to -41.7 from -44.8 last week.

In wholesale trade, inventories rose  a strong 1.0% in December, and a 1.3% rise in sales leaves the stock-to-sales ratio unchanged at 1.15.

~
Dale Franks
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CAFE standards, market distortion and the usual results

In light of the article below on the failure of communism (which, necessarily, relies on central planning and ignores markets), this is an interesting topic:

The CAFE rule is the fleet-wide average fuel economy rating manufacturers are required by Washington to achieve. The new rule — issued in response to a 2010 Obama directive, not to specific legislation passed by Congress — would require automakers to achieve a 40.9 mpg CAFE average by 2021 and 54.5 mpg by 2025.

Got that folks … your representatives had nothing to say about or do with this.  It was dictated from on high.

In case you’re wondering whatever happened to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, it has been supplanted in the CAFE process by the EPA. The proposed regulation was designed, according to the EPA, "to preserve consumer choice — that is, the proposed standards should not affect consumers’ opportunity to purchase the size of vehicle with the performance, utility and safety features that meets their needs." But the reality is that consumer choice will be the first victim.

And that essentially means that with the switch from the NHTSA to EPA, the auto industry most likely had no place at the table.  An agency with an agenda but little experience with the industry came up with the new rules.

Also note the usual pandering to choice.  They talk the talk, but reality shows they’re not at all sincere about it:

Getting from the current 35 mpg CAFE standard to 54.5 can be achieved by such expedients as making air conditioning systems work more efficiently. We have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell to anybody who thinks that’s even remotely realistic. There is one primary method of increasing fuel economy — weight reduction. That in turn means automakers will have to use much more exotic materials, including especially the petroleum-processing byproduct known as "plastic." But using more plastic will make it much more difficult to satisfy current federal safety standards. The bottom-line will be much more expensive vehicles and dramatically fewer kinds of vehicles.

They’ll have to be much smaller and much lighter and they’ll cost an average of $3,200 dollars more (and that’s the lowball estimate).  Yup, no intrusion into the market there.  They’ve given “choice” lip service – get over it.

Result?

The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects that there will be no vehicles costing $15,000 or less, the segment of the market that college students and low-income consumers depend upon. Altogether, an estimated seven million buyers will be forced out of the market for new cars.

Note, it’s the new car market at risk. 

And:

Total costs, as calculated by the EPA, will exceed $157 billion, making this by far the most expensive CAFE rule ever. For comparison, the previous rule in 2010 cost $51 billion, according to the EPA. But the EPA doesn’t include this fact in its calculation: Annual U.S. car sales are 14-16 million units, yet over time, this rule will remove the equivalent of half a year’s worth of buyers.

But remember, to the sycophants, this is the crew that “saved” the auto industry.  Now you can understand that it was only for political reasons that was attempted.  Those jobs and industries, after this election year, are no longer critical.  In fact, they actually hamper the goal to “revolutionize” the energy sector.  That’s much more important than the middle class the left is currently and conveniently so fond of.

Put this one under “the law of intended consequences”.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

Economic Statistics for 3 Feb 12

Today’s economic statistical releases:

Factory orders rose a very healthy 1.1% in December. November’s orders were also upwardly revised to a 2.2% jump.

A very strong ISM non-manufacturing report showed the index jump to 56.8—well above expectations—based on a huge jump in employment and new orders.

The Monster employment index fell to 133 in January from 140 in December.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 243,000 new net jobs were created last month, while the unemployment rate fell to 8.2%. Average hourly earnings increased 0.2%, and the average workweek rose to 34.5 hours. The new jobs came entirely from private payrolls, with private jobs increasing by 257,000. All is not quite as rosy as the headline numbers indicate, however:

  • Another 132,000 people left the labor force, as the labor force declined from 153,617,000 to 153,485,000.
  • The labor force participation rate declined to 63.4, the lowest since February, 1984.
  • The number of Americans who consider themselves employed rose to 139,944,000 from 139,869,000 last month, an increase of only 75,000. Meanwhile, the working age population rose from 239,618,00 to 424.269,000, an increase of 2,651,000.

So, some things to keep in mind might be a comparison of the peak of the last cycle’s employment, in November of 2007 to today. In making that comparison, some things become much clearer:

  • In November, 2007, 63.15% of Americans had a job. In Feburary, 2012, it was 57.76%.
  • In November, 2007, there were 147,118,000 Americans working. This month, that number was 139,944,000. That’s 7.1 million jobs that have disappeared.
  • If the labor force participation rate was the same today as it was in November 2007 (66.1%), today’s unemployment rate would be 12.61%.

~
Dale Franks
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The jobs report

A good job report this month drops the “official” unemployment rate to 8.3%.  That, of course, will be touted as significant progress and, on one level, it is.  The number of jobs created is above the maintenance level.  That means a real net gain.

But there are some underlying numbers that are much less positive.

While the job creation is “well above expectations”, there’s another record that masks the real unemployment number.

Namely 1.2 million workers (another record) fell out of the labor force.  That’s one reason the official rate looks good. 

And, probably the most important number to be considered – the labor participation rate – fell to 63.7% which is a 30 year low and reflects the loss of those 1.2 million workers from the work force.  Neither of those numbers are good.

That said, the report on the numbers of jobs created is a good report and may signal some growth. It is, for a change, above the maintenance level of jobs.   But you have to keep in mind that in overall terms, and despite the official numbers, the job situation still has a very, very long way to go.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

Economic Statistics for 2 Feb 12

Today’s economic statistical releases:

Chain store sales are coming in mixed today, with no identifiable spending or consumer trends. It’s looking like there’ll be little change to the upcoming retail sales report this month, which was disappointingly unchanged in December.

The Challenger Job Cut Report indicates that layoff announcements rose to 53,486 in January from 41,785 in December. That’s a big monthly jump, and raises warning signs about employment.

The Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index rose to -44.8 from last month’s -46.4.

Initial claims for unemployment fell 12,000 to a lower-than-expected 367,000. the 4-week moving average posted a a 2,000 decline to 375,750.

Productivity growth in the 4th quarter slowed to a lower than expected 0.7% from 2.3% in the previous quarter. Unit labor costs rose 1.2%, compared to the previous quarter’s drop of -2.5%.

~
Dale Franks
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Economic Statistics for 1 Feb 12 (Update)

Today’s economic statistical releases:

The Mortgage Bankers Association reports that home purchase applications fell -1.7% and re-fis fell -3.6%, bringing the composite down -2.9%.

The ADP Employment Report largely met expectations, showing an increase of 170,000 new jobs for January.

UPDATE: Motor vehicle sales were released this afternoon. Vehicle sales jumped to a 14.2 million annual rate in January for a 5% gain over last month. For the first time in 9 months car sales outpaced truck sales, and were up 13% to a 7.4 million annual rate. Truck sales fell -4% to an annual 6.8 million annual rate.

~
Dale Franks
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