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Diplomat, heal thyself
Posted by: mcq on Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Got to love this stuff:
Diplomats from Mexico and Central America on Monday demanded guest worker programs and the legalization of undocumented migrants in the United States, while criticizing a U.S. proposal for tougher border enforcement.

Meeting in Mexico's capital, the regional officials pledged to do more to fight migrant trafficking, but indirectly condemned a U.S. bill that would make illegal entry a felony and extend border walls.

"Migrants, regardless of their migratory status, should not be treated like criminals," they said.
Except those who are here illegally are criminals, thus the term ... illegal.


And, other than the fact that the boys and girls from Mexico and Central America don't get to make those sorts of determinations, I'd have to ask "what's your point"?

But, of course, the point is more immigration to the US to relieve problems within their own homelands. I mean, how else do you explain diplomats from sovereign nations complaining that we're not letting enough of their people in, when, in fact, they're flooding in. The reason they're complaining is twofold. A) they like the boost to the economy the money sent from the US brings their country, and B) they're not at all eager that we send back those who are here illegally (you know, the criminals). Of course we seem to have no desire to enforce our own laws so it seems a moot point.
Mexicans working in the United States are a huge source of revenue for Mexico, sending home more than $16 billion in remittances in 2004, Mexico's second largest source of foreign currency after oil exports according to the country's central bank.
Obviously an economic immigrant, be he illegal or not, isn't the threat to our national security than is an illegal bent on death and destruction. Our problem, however, is we have no idea which is which right now. Most rational folks would consider that to be a dangerous position in which to find yourself ... if national security really is a priority, that is.

However, Luis Derbez, the Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary had this very diplomatic message to convey to his neighbor to the north:
"There has to be an integrated reform that includes a temporary worker program, but also the regularization of those people who are already living in receptor countries," Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Luis Ernesto Derbez said.

Derbez has called the measure _ which passed the U.S. House of Representatives last month but still must go before the Senate _ "stupid and underhanded," but was somewhat more restrained on Monday, saying "it's not the Mexican government's position to tell the U.S. Senate what to do."
Meanwhile, as we noted, Mexico is a flagrant violator of exactly those things it is demanding of the US. Of course the US has told Mexico's President, Vincente Fox, that he needs to get a handle on the problem from his side of the border (not to mention getting a handle on the problems which are driving migrants to the US rather than having them stay in Mexico):
Fox's spokesman, Ruben Aguilar, defended the administration's record on Monday, telling reporters that migration has declined in recent years, though official figures show it remains at historically high levels.

Aguilar also said migrants "don't emigrate because they lack work, but rather for a series of other reasons, cultural reasons or better living conditions."
Yeah? Say a lot about how well you guys are doing, doesn't it Mr. Aguilar?
 
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Obviously an economic immigrant, be he illegal or not isn’t the threat to our national security than is an illegal bent on death and destruction. Our problem, however, is we have no idea which is which right now. Most rational folks would consider that to be a dangerous in which to find yourself ... if national security really is a priority, that is.
It ain’t just that. The torrent of economic migrants coming from Mexico makes it that much more difficult for us to prevent terrorists from coming across that same border. A guest worker program won’t solve this problem: their very illegality (and, consequently, the lack of a paper trail) is part of the benefit to employers.

Meanwhile, Mexico, with an official national language and more stringent immigration laws than we have, is bitching about how we treat immigrants over here.
 
Written By: Dave Schuler
URL: http://www.theglitteringeye.com

 
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