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The Venezuela/Iran connection
Posted by: McQ on Monday, January 16, 2006

Yes I find what is happening in Venezuela fascinating as it is a case study in the rise of an autocracy from democratic instititions (and something which is a real threat to emerging democracies everywhere). And yes I think it is instructive which is why I spend so much time on Chavez and Venezuela. The mechanism for making hiding an autocracy in democratic clothing, as outlined here, seems to me to be a formula which gives the emerging dictator cover while allowing him to consolodate his power. It is a veneer of democracy which keeps the world from his door.

But it does little to solve the real world problems with which he's faced and despite his power, may spell his end. Unless, of course, he moves to outright oppression (which would work against him) or actual democratic reforms (which, by his nature and how he's consolidated power seem anathema to his modus operendi).

Mary Anastasia O'Grady has a piece in the WSJ which reviews the state of Chavez and Venezuela. One of the more troubling relationships (and no, it's not with Cuba) she comments on is between Chavez and Ahmadinejad of Iran.
With Iranian nuclear aspirations gaining notice, it's worth directing attention to the growing relationship between Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez. The Reagan administration repulsed Soviet efforts to set up camp in Central America. Iranian designs on Venezuela perhaps deserve similar U.S. attention.

The warmth and moral support between Ahmadinejad and Chávez is very public. The two tyrants are a lot more than just pen pals. Venezuela has made it clear that it backs Iran's nuclear ambitions and embraces the mullahs' hateful anti-Semitism. What remains more speculative is just how far along Iran is in putting down roots in Venezuela.

In September, when the International Atomic Energy Agency offered a resolution condemning Iran for its "many failures and breaches of its obligations to comply" with its treaty commitments, Venezuela was the only country that voted "no." Ahmadinejad congratulated the Venezuelan government, calling the vote "brave and judicious."
O'Grady reviews what most consider Chavez's anti-Semitic remarks and offers this anecdote to back her conclusion that he backs his rhetoric with action:
Three months later, in a Christmas Eve TV broadcast, Chávez declared that "minorities, the descendants of those who crucified Christ, have taken over the riches of the world." That ugly anti-Semitic swipe was of a piece with an insidious assault over the past several years on the country's Jewish community. In 2004, heavily armed Chávez commandos raided a Caracas Jewish school, terrifying children and parents. The government's claim that it had reason to believe that the school was storing arms was never supported. A more reasonable explanation is that the raid was part of the Chávez political strategy of fomenting class hatred—an agenda that finds a vulnerable target in the country's Jewish minority—and as a way to show Tehran that Venezuela is on board. Ahmadinejad rivals Hitler in his hatred for the Jewish people.
Coincidence or calculated move? Or both? Regardless, Chavez has found that the Orwellian formula of creating enemies for his regime is useful domestically. That's because things aren't going as swimmingly within the country as he'd like those outside the country to believe:
That Chávez is making a hash of the Venezuelan economy while he courts international notoriety is no secret. There are shortages of foodstuffs that are abundant even in other poor countries. Milk, flour for the national delight known as arepas, and sugar are in short supply. Coffee is scarce because roasters say government controls have set the price below costs, forcing them to eat losses. The Chávez response last week was a threat to nationalize the industry.

Property rights are being abolished. Last week, authorities invaded numerous "unoccupied" apartments in Caracas to hand them over to party faithful, part of a wider scheme to "equalize" life for Venezuelans.

A bridge collapse earlier this month on the main artery linking Caracas to the country's largest airport, seaport and an enormous bedroom community is seen as a microcosm of the country's failing infrastructure. Aside from the damage to commerce, it has caused great difficulties for the estimated 100,000 commuters who live on the coast, Robert Bottome, editor of the newsletter Veneconomy, told me from Caracas on Wednesday. The collapse diverted all this traffic to an old two-lane road with hairpin turns and more than 300 curves. It is now handling car traffic during the day and commercial traffic at night, with predictable backups.

With Venezuelan oil fields experiencing an annual depletion rate on the order of 25% and little government reinvestment in the sector, similar infrastructure problems are looming in oil. In November, Goldman Sachs emerging markets research commented on a fire at a "major refinery complex" in which 20 workers were injured: "In recent months there has been a string of accidents and other disruptions [of] oil infrastructure, which oil experts attribute to inadequate investment in maintenance and lack of technical expertise to run complex oil refining and exploration operations."
At some point, Chavez, who shuns capitalism for socialism, will have to face the fact that trying to alter the laws of economics even with unimpeded access to billions of oil money, won't work forever. At this point, the lesson doesn't seem to be taking:
Chávez is notably nonchalant about all this, as if the health of the economy is the last thing on his mind. His foreign affiliations are more important to him. The Iranian news agency MEHR said last year that the two countries have signed contracts valued at more than $1 billion. In sum, Iranians, presiding over an economy that is itself crumbling into disrepair, are going to build Venezuela 10,000 residential units and a batch of manufacturing plants, if MEHR can be believed. Chávez reportedly says these deals—presumably financed with revenues that might be better employed repairing the vital bridge—include the transfer of "technology" from Iran and the importation of Iranian "professionals" to support the efforts.

Details on the Iranian "factories"—beyond a high-profile tractor producer and a widely publicized cement factory—remain sketchy. But what is clear is that the importation of state agents from Hugo-friendly dictatorships hasn't been a positive experience for Venezuelans. Imported Cubans are now applying their "skills" in intelligence and state security networks to the detriment of Venezuelan liberty. It is doubtful that the growing presence of Iranians in "factories" across Venezuela is about boosting plastic widget output. The U.S. intelligence agencies would do well to make a greater effort to find out exactly what projects the Chávez-Ahmadinejad duo really have in mind. Almost certainly, they are up to no good.
Again, something to monitor and watch. But I have to agree with O'Grady, I can find little in the way of 'good' in terms of regional stability which can come from any Iranian-Venezuelan relationship, especially given the two leaders of those countries. The other reason to watch this closely is Iran's nuclear gambit. Do we want to see the same sort of thing going on in Venezuela sometime in the near future? With the paranoid rantings of Chavez still fresh in our ears, it's hardly a far-fetched concern.
 
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Should be interesting to she how modern Democrats advocate handling the Venezuelan Missle Crisis, especially when there’s precedent by one of their historical icons.
 
Written By: John
URL: http://
Yes I find what is happening in Venezuela fascinating as it is a case study in the rise of an autocracy from democratic instititions (and something which is a real threat to emerging democracies everywhere). And yes I think it is instructive which is why I spend so much time on Chavez and Venezuela. The mechanism for making hiding an autocracy in democratic clothing, as outlined here, seems to me to be a formula which gives the emerging dictator cover while allowing him to consolodate his power. It is a veneer of democracy which keeps the world from his door.
No need to look south of the border for such a case study, of course. You have one right here in the good ole’ USA.

From Alter’s piece in NEWSWEEK:
Remember, this is not about whether it’s right or wrong to wiretap bad guys, though the White House hopes to frame it that way for political purposes. Any rational person wants the president to be able to hunt for Qaeda suspects wherever they lurk. The "momentous" issue (Alito’s words) is whether this president, or any other, has the right to tell Congress to shove it. And even if one concedes that wartime offers the president extra powers to limit liberty, what happens if the terrorist threat looks permanent? We may be scrapping our checks and balances not just for a few years (as during the Civil War), but for good.

Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Russ Feingold ably raised some of these questions last week; Al Gore is about to weigh in, too. But the Democratic Party as a whole cannot stay focused on the issue. Some activists keep jumping ahead to the remedy for the president’s power grab, which they say is impeachment. But that’s a pipe dream and a distraction from the task at hand, which is figuring out how to reassert Congress’s institutional role. This must by necessity involve Republicans, who control Congress. Unfortunately, most have so far shown little concern about being defenestrated by their president.
I got your case study right here, McQ.
 
Written By: mkultra
URL: http://
Obviously, the Venezuelan/Iranian conncection is a concern, but truly a minor one.

But for once, it would be nice if the right wing media would show the same concern over a much more important and dangerous connection the Iranians are establishing with another country, namely, Iraq.

But to do that, of course, would make Bush look bad. So we can’t have that.

Again, this is another of the most underreported stories of the year. I think most Americans have little idea regarding the extent to which Iranian intelligence has infiltrated the Iraqi government, and what little the Bush administration has done to halt their efforts. There simply is no outrage on the right on this subject. For wingers, it’s as if the Iran that is slowly gaining a grip over Iraq is a different country entirely than the one that is fast becoming the number one nuclear threat.

So instead of using the space in the WSJ opinion page to deal with the Iran/Iraq connection, a real threat, O’Grady wastes it talking about a side show. But what would one expect from the lapdogs at the WSJ?

 
Written By: mkultra
URL: http://
Iran is seeking nuclear weapons and the missles to carry them.

They could have the power to reach Europe within their grasp. But ICBM’s may be to large a feat to pull off in the near future.

Launching missles from South America (or possibly Central America in the near future) is much less technically challenging.

But I guess that’s a minor concern.
 
Written By: John
URL: http://
Historically, democracies are destroyed from within, by charismatic great leaders. Rome and Germany both gladly gave away their democracies for glory. Every time a democracy grants its executive a little more power the democracy dies just a little. People trade liberty for perceived security lightly, never realizing that it is their loss of personal liberty that cost them dearest. What flows to the leader never returns to the people. The original intent of the constitution was to prevent the creation of a King. All our haggling over justices interpeting the original intent seems to have missed the big picture.


One of the reasons that I get cross with members of this blog is that they find it so easy to criticize autocracy from institutions when it happens abroad but find it so difficult to see it at home. It’s so easy to see how the Venezuelans and Iranians are manipulated but impossible to see the same tactics work here so effectively.


The US is just as big a threat to Chavez as the Iraqi insurgents are to Bush. We did encourage a coup, and a friend of the president has urged his murder. Iran is in the axis of evil. Could we make it easier to convice Iranians and Venezuelans that we are a threat? Those who proudly stand behind their great leaders do democracy a disservice. We are all weaker and less secure when our leaders are strong. A new leadership would do wonders towards making this threat go away.

 
Written By: cindy
URL: http://
We are all weaker and less secure when our leaders are strong.

The ostrich defense. We must aquit

Hey, it worked so well for 1930’s Europe. Deja vu all over again.
 
Written By: John
URL: http://
But for once, it would be nice if the right wing media would show the same concern over a much more important and dangerous connection the Iranians are establishing with another country, namely, Iraq

Far be it from me to interpret the fine fellows who author this blogline magazine, but I think you’re wrong regarding this site.

I believe that they do realize the strategic importance of Iranian influence in Iraq, they just discount it as improbable. I know that I’ve brought it up on numerous occasions. It’s just that they discount the theory as unlikely.

Given that the U.S. presence in Iraq will most likely discourage Iranian influence, it remains as the primary advocacy for going there (influencing Western culture and governance in the Middle East). However, they wrongly proselytize that it was the primary reason for going there. It also remains the primary reason for indefinitely staying there.

There are numerous justifications for this position. And it is reasonable to assume that these actions will result favorably for the U.S. and the world.
The problem with their assumption’s have become evident. The Iraqi’s, the Muslim world generally, do not prescribe to our notion of what is beneficent. In short, we cannot make them take their medicine. And all the teaspoons of sugar in the world will not make it go down any easier.

I fully respect their reasoning, I just don’t prescribe to it. I fear, however, that when you force a child to take their medicine, you best make sure they don’t spit it back up in your face.

Or you slap the child, silly. Either or.
 
Written By: PogueMahone
URL: http://
MKultra: I just got out of Caracas. I saw Iranian tractors being used to confiscate ranches and turn them into collective farms out in the countryside and I saw women in black chadors with lots of gold rings on their fingers next to their Iranian husbands at Maiquetia airport. I think the Iranian ties are stronger than we might imagine.
 
Written By: A.M.Mora y Leon
URL: http://publiuspundit.com
Mora y Leon,

MKultra: I just got out of Caracas. I saw Iranian tractors being used to confiscate ranches and turn them into collective farms out in the countryside and I saw women in black chadors with lots of gold rings on their fingers next to their Iranian husbands at Maiquetia airport. I think the Iranian ties are stronger than we might imagine.

Thank God you made it alive! praise the lord for sparing your life, you could have been run down by an Iranian tractor. Are they radio-active?

And the gold rings, where they 18k?

I am happy you are safe back in the USA. Please stay there so you won’t be nuke.

 
Written By: Orlando
URL: http://
Americans, a question for you all.

Why is it that the USA, Israel, Russia, India, Pakistan etc are allowed to have WMD and other countries can not, like Iran or Venezuela?

After all if it was based on danger level and trust, the USA would be disqualified since you are the only nation who have use WMD against others. Hiroshima, Nagasaky, Iraq, Kosovo.

What gives you the right?

Look forward to your sophisticated answers.
 
Written By: Orlando
URL: http://
I just got out of Caracas. I saw Iranian tractors being used to confiscate ranches and turn them into collective farms out in the countryside and I saw women in black chadors with lots of gold rings on their fingers next to their Iranian husbands at Maiquetia airport. I think the Iranian ties are stronger than we might imagine.

Oh goodness ... don’t confuse MK with facts. Have mercy, please.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/
Why is it that the USA, Israel, Russia, India, Pakistan etc are allowed to have WMD and other countries can not, like Iran or Venezuela?

Because that’s how nuclear non-proliferation works?

You know, the treaty Iran signed and agree to abide by?
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/
Americans, a question for you all.
You will notice that it is hardly only Americans who are concerned about the prospect of Iran attaining nuclear weapons.

 
Written By: Rosensteel
URL: http://
Orlando don’t need no stinkin’ treaties! He right!
 
Written By: Notherbob2
URL: http://
We used WMD in Kosovo and Iraq? Cool....
Why aren’t we having Senate investigations, or at least demands for them?
I understand not for Kosovo, that was a ’good and just war’ fought by a
’good and just president’.

But shoot, you’d think we’d be hearing more about our WMD use in Iraq, being
run by Bushitler and Haliburton and all.
What did we use, Nerve gas? Poison Gas? Nukes?

Yeah, I can hardly wait to see how responsible "Israel should be destroyed" Iran is, and "they’re trying to kill me" Chavez sounds like he’s right there on the fore-front of sanity.
Just the sort of people the world needs to have Nukes.

Clearly, you don’t get it though, and I’m sure there’s a reason for that.
 
Written By: looker
URL: http://
looker

I understand not for Kosovo, that was a ’good and just war’ fought by a ’good and just president’.

Good and Just = ethnic cleansing, was good wasn’t it, that was some mini holocaust wasn’t it, but it was against muslins which makes it ok. Right looker? no in the news every year, is it? they don’t count, they aren’t real humans just like those 18 pakistany’s you blew away yesterday, ooops just kidding... we thought a bad Al Qaueda man was there. Very nice, long live the USA!

It was Clinton who represented the pentagon and the CIA at that time.

I must say: beside liking weed and BJ’s he was honest, unlike dubya.

Looks like Hillary will have an easy time defeating the next Republican puppet.
 
Written By: Orlando
URL: http://
There is no difference between Bush and Ahmadinajad. Iran is selling the US most of the fuel for it’s tanks and trucks in Iraq.

Both leaders thrive and profit on perpetual war. Their goal is to instill fear and anxiety, so that their people will accept corruption, tyranny, and ignorance under the guise of patriotism and religion. They rattle their sabres and parade their phallic missles as enemies, while they are all in bed with one another. There is only one ideology of power, and it has no bounds in what it will undertake.

Wake up people, you are sheep and your sole purpose is to get fleeced and shagged by the so-called leaders of your political and religious flocks.

They are cut from the same cloth. Fundamentalism and militarism, bibles and flags, guns and politicians are what rule humanity.

Democracy, freedom and heaven are fairy tales. They are all designed to keep you working, obedient, and in denial so that others can profit from your work and compliance.
 
Written By: Anad
URL: http://
Orlando - I can understand the intrepretation, but no, there’s nothing particularly wrong with the War in Kosovo, actually.
My point was we got involved under a President the media liked, and so there was
favorable coverage, and not constant cries for investigations and impeachments (oops, well, okay, maybe there were...but not over Kosovo)
And Bill was the one who stomped the aspirin factory flat in Sudan trying to blow up WMDs but just overlook that too.

I don’t much favor anyone being killed, anywhere, any time, for religious, political or economic reasons, regardless of who the hell they are, or who
they worship. Peace is pretty cool.
I do draw the line when they think it’s a fascinating idea to blow me on the premise that I’m only a godless evil bastard who deserves to die anyway because of where I was born and raised (you can see there’s a whole lot of concern about the death of innocents there in that line of reasoning).

I think all of us would be far less troubled if the guys in Iran weren’t out discussing destroying other countries while they reopen their nuke facilities.
See, that makes people nervous when you talk about blowing shit up, and you also mumble at around the same time, that you really need nuclear weapons.
People tend to add those two things together and come to a conclusion about your intentions regardless of what they may in fact be.

RE the Pakistanis - seems the Pakistani government feels like at least four of the guys who came to dinner weren’t even from Pakistan. And the rest of the dinner party wasn’t there for a wedding. But don’t let reality intrude on
your dislike of the US.

Finally, I’m waiting for the info on which WMDs we used in Kosovo and Iraq.
Especially Kosovo now, because you think Bill was honest, unlike Dubya.
 
Written By: looker
URL: http://
Democracy, freedom and heaven are fairy tales. They are all designed to keep you working, obedient, and in denial so that others can profit from your work and compliance.

Agree 100%

Looker.

Depleted Uranium is what is being used in Iraq and was used in Kosovo.

RE the Pakistanis - seems the Pakistani government feels like at least four of the guys who came to dinner weren’t even from Pakistan. And the rest of the dinner party wasn’t there for a wedding. But don’t let reality intrude on
your dislike of the US.


Oh... my bad, thanks for showing me reality.

BTW I do not dislike the US, I despice Bush and his criminal bunch. I have many American friends.

It’s people like McQ that use blogs like this one to misinform people that I disagree with.
 
Written By: Orlando
URL: http://
Democracy, freedom and heaven are fairy tales. They are all designed to keep you working, obedient, and in denial so that others can profit from your work and compliance.

Agree 100%


Kinda says it all, eh Orlando? Viva Che, huh?


RE the Pakistanis - seems the Pakistani government feels like at least four of the guys who came to dinner weren’t even from Pakistan. And the rest of the dinner party wasn’t there for a wedding. But don’t let reality intrude on
your dislike of the US.

Oh... my bad, thanks for showing me reality.


Actually it appears it was more like 7, but that’s ok.

BTW I do not dislike the US, I despice Bush and his criminal bunch. I have many American friends.

Of course you do, Orlando, and I bet I know their type.

It’s people like McQ that use blogs like this one to misinform people that I disagree with.

Said the man who has yet to offer a single bit a credible rebuttal to my supposed misinformation. But hey, why break a streak, huh Orlando?
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/
Orlando Furioso...
If you mean by WMD that we mass destroyed a good deal of Serbian armor and
Iraqi armor using DU, I’ll go along with that.
If you’re referring to depleted uranium as a weapon of mass destruction because it is created from, err....uranium, you might do some fact checking on
the actual danger.

Unless you’re claiming the Bosnians and Iraqi’s are eating dirt and sand
from "contaminated" sites, and that we’re responsible for THAT behavior.

And before you get all excited, even the W.H.O. doesn’t consider it a major
health hazard, and hardly in the same category as say, um nerve gas or
a tactical nuclear weapon in the hands of a guy who thinks the destruction of Israel is a practical and sane idea.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs257/en/

But you’re probably all charged up about the word uranium, without bothering to wonder what ’depleted’ really means....
It’s not totally safe, I’m not recommending it for dinner this week, but given a choice between a toxic nerve agent, bio weapon or nuke strike and depleted uranium, I’d take my chances with DU.

and it’s not a WMD...just in case you can’t figure that out.
 
Written By: looker
URL: http://
Dangerous conections and unclear deals between Iran and Venezuela for sure is bringing more than one headache to the Bush Adm. No just the technology that Iran is going to place in Venezuela is actually the physical ability to reach the USA from South America but not with bombs and misiles rather with their mentality and principles: in this case Religioun belives \Muslins in a 90 percent catholic sociaty, in a country where the hate agains America is in the raise. Perhaps a new land for hosting and training terrorists with the only purpose in mind to destroy America.

Venezuela is an open door in America Security!!
 
Written By: WSS
URL: http://
Up until now Chavez has been perceived as a circus sideshow freak, annoying and troublesome, even threatening to neighbors like President Uribe of Colombia. The US was concerned but not moved to action. However, the nexus of Venezuela and Iran has brought a condition which threatens to bring terrible harm to all the people of the Western Hemisphere. One hint of a covert passage for nuclear terrorists would move the United State immediately to military action. Chavez may find that his oil business is suddenly turned into a glass factory.
 
Written By: Cecil Whig
URL: http://
Many Venezuelan´s have been crying at load to the world for the last 7 years, that something really dangerous was going on here, that could represent not only a threat to our liberty and democratic system, but a security treat to America.

Oil seems to be an atraction so beautifull that the world has turned their heads and desgregarded the issue, I hope americans don´t wake up one day like the 11th september in compleat surprice.

And Chavez is not a "circus sideshow freak" he is one of thouse for whom power is the basic and ethics is something only fools think about
 
Written By: Natalia
URL: http://
I am a venezuelan citizen and live in Caracas. Chávez blames the US for anything that goes wrong in this country and in the rest of the world. He wants to turn the whole world against the US, with the hope of isolating it and finally choking it to death. For that purpose, he’s been using oil and petrodollars as weapons. He hates the US and what the US stands for. Chavez is a militaristic sociopath and extremely fascist, despite his left-wing rhetoric. There are strong rumors that he has teamed up with the iranians to mine and exploit uranium deposits in this country, for the purpose of helping Iran develop nuclear weapons. Now, he’s also trying to develop a "space launching site" in the venezuelan plains. To many here, that’s just a cover for a missile launching facility, that would aim nuclear weapons at the US. There are thousands of cuban agents in Venezuela, and possibly also about 200 north koreans. Many of the cubans have been placed within the military establishment, to assure control. He’s referered to Cuba as an "ocean of happiness", and has spoken of joining both countries as one nation. He’s creating a 2 million soldier militia that will answer to him directly. Their basic training scenario is an invasion from the US. They refer to it as "asymmetric war". He’s buying billions of US$ in weapons everywhere. Far more than needed in a country such as this. He’s trying to spread his revolution to other countries. His strategy has been to pick fights with other heads of state, in order to divide public opinion in those countries. This would, purportedly, allow him to obtain the simpathy from the political opposition in those countries. Once such opposition groups become government, he expects that they will be loyal to him in the international arena. This has already happened in Bolivia. His former ambassador to Mexico was photographed at an opposition presidential rally, lifting candidate López Obrador’s arm in a sign of victory. The ambassador was expelled from Mexico, after Chávez publically called president Fox, a "puppy of the empire".

Sadly, the US was late in discovering who Chávez really is. All state institutions are under Chavez´s control, including the Electoral Council. Elections in Venezuela are grossly rigged. Voting is done electronically and the system allows the government to monitor in real time, how any citizen votes. The Electoral Council refuses to count votes manually. That´s the reason why the opposition candidates withdrew from the last congressional race. There was a 75% abstention rate in the election and approximately half of those that finally voted, ended up invalidating their own votes on purpose. Prominent government figures appeared on national TV during the polls, announcing that any state employee that did not show up to vote, would be fired from his/her job. The opposition in Venezuela is dispersed and so bullied by Chavez. The press has progressively been muzzled through the judiciary. Laws have been enacted, that are so vague, that any interpretation could come from them. This has been done on purpose to persecute and punish the disidence in Venezuela. I could go on, but if you stayed with me up to this point, you should begin to get an idea of what is happening in Venezuela today.
 
Written By: Concerned in Venezuela
URL: http://
I am in agreement with the rational minds, that something should be done to shore up the gap in the buttplate of our national security armour. Venezuela certainly poses a huge threat as long as Chavez is in power, and it only becomes more critical as he gains repore with other Dictators. The simple fact that small level nukes could be manufactured in the same hemisphere as our landmass is plain frightening.

Here is the problem. No one will move, no one will take action. Because of Venezuela’s (and Iran’s) oil, we are fearful to move. If we strike, we get the rest of the world looking down their noses (big deal, they already do), but we get cut off from a huge oil suplier. PDVSA/CITGO are sudenly no more. An eigth of your gas stations are gone. That economical force alone will drive gas prices sky high. Consider all the ohter companies that buy gas from Venezuela as well.

Solution? Ethenol. With the cropland in the US and Canada and our allies, we can produce far more than enough sugar cane and corn to drive our country on alternative fuel. Brazil is doing it. 90% self suficient. They have no relience on outside fuels. Why are we not there. I could blame some republican presidents, I could blame some democrats. We should have started 15-20 yrs ago. But at any rate, if we were self sufficient in energy, we would have no barrier stoping us from waveing a big iron clad fist at Chavez, and even giving him a bloody lip. No bully enjoys pain and embarassment.
 
Written By: Chris
URL: http://

 
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