Meta-Blog

SEARCH QandO

Email:
Jon Henke
Bruce "McQ" McQuain
Dale Franks
Bryan Pick
Billy Hollis
Lance Paddock
MichaelW

BLOGROLL QandO

 
 
Recent Posts
The Ayers Resurrection Tour
Special Friends Get Special Breaks
One Hour
The Hope and Change Express - stalled in the slow lane
Michael Steele New RNC Chairman
Things that make you go "hmmmm"...
Oh yeah, that "rule of law" thing ...
Putting Dollar Signs in Front Of The AGW Hoax
Moving toward a 60 vote majority?
Do As I Say ....
 
 
QandO Newsroom

Newsroom Home Page

US News

US National News
Politics
Business
Science
Technology
Health
Entertainment
Sports
Opinion/Editorial

International News

Top World New
Iraq News
Mideast Conflict

Blogging

Blogpulse Daily Highlights
Daypop Top 40 Links

Regional

Regional News

Publications

News Publications

 
Alan Dershowitz slams Jimmy Carter for taking Arab money
Posted by: McQ on Saturday, April 28, 2007

Alan Dershowitz claims that the reason Jimmy Carter is so supportive of the Palestinian cause (and seems to be inclined toward anti-semitism) is because he's been accepting money from pretty disreputable sources:
Recent disclosures of Carter's extensive financial connections to Arab oil money, particularly from Saudi Arabia, had deeply shaken my belief in his integrity. When I was first told that he received a monetary reward in the name of Shiekh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan, and kept the money, even after Harvard returned money from the same source because of its anti-Semitic history, I simply did not believe it. How could a man of such apparent integrity enrich himself with dirty money from so dirty a source?

And let there be no mistake about how dirty the Zayed Foundation is. I know because I was involved, in a small way, in helping to persuade Harvard University to return more than $2 million that the financially strapped Divinity School received from this source. Initially, I was reluctant to put pressure on Harvard to turn back money for the Divinity School, but then a student at the Divinity School, Rachael Lea Fish showed me the facts.

They were staggering. I was amazed that in the twenty-first century there were still foundations that espoused these views. The Zayed Centre for Coordination and Follow-up, a think-tank funded by the Shiekh and run by his son, hosted speakers who called Jews "the enemies of all nations," attributed the assassination of John Kennedy to Israel and the Mossad and the 9/11 attacks to the United States' own military, and stated that the Holocaust was a "fable." (They also hosted a speech by Jimmy Carter.) To its credit, Harvard turned the money back. To his discredit, Carter did not.

Jimmy Carter was, of course, aware of Harvard's decision, since it was highly publicized. Yet he kept the money. Indeed, this is what he said in accepting the funds: "This award has special significance for me because it is named for my personal friend, Sheik Zayed bin Sultan al-Nahyan." Carter's personal friend, it turns out, was an unredeemable anti-Semite and all-around bigot.

In reading Carter's statements, I was reminded of the bad old Harvard of the nineteen thirties, which continued to honor Nazi academics after the anti-Semitic policies of Hitler's government became clear. Harvard of the nineteen thirties was complicit in evil. I sadly concluded that Jimmy Carter of the twenty-first century has become complicit in evil.

The extent of Carter's financial support from, and even dependence on, dirty money is still not fully known. What we do know is deeply troubling. Carter and his Center have accepted millions of dollars from suspect sources, beginning with the bail-out of the Carter family peanut business in the late 1970s by BCCI, a now-defunct and virulently anti-Israeli bank indirectly controlled by the Saudi Royal family, and among whose principal investors is Carter's friend, Sheikh Zayed. Agha Hasan Abedi, the founder of the bank, gave Carter "$500,000 to help the former president establish his center...[and] more than $10 million to Mr. Carter's different projects."

Carter gladly accepted the money, though Abedi had called his bank, ostensibly the source of his funding, "the best way to fight the evil influence of the Zionists." BCCI isn't the only source: Saudi King Fahd contributed millions to the Carter Center "in 1993 alone...$7.6 million" as have other members of the Saudi Royal Family. Carter also received a million dollar pledge from the Saudi-based bin Laden family, as well as a personal $500,000 environmental award named for Sheikh Zayed, and paid for by the Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates. It's worth noting that, despite the influx of Saudi money funding the Carter Center, and despite the Saudi Arabian government's myriad human rights abuses, the Carter Center's Human Rights program has no activity whatever in Saudi Arabia.
A pretty damning indictment, if accurate. Dershowitz goes on to claim that the money has significantly influenced the Carter Center's activities:
The Saudis have apparently bought his silence for a steep price. The bought quality of the Center's activities becomes even more clear, however, when reviewing the Center's human rights activities in other countries: essentially no human rights activities in China or in North Korea, or in Iran, Iraq, the Sudan, or Syria, but activity regarding Israel and its alleged abuses, according to the Center's website.

The Carter Center's mission statement claims that "The Center is nonpartisan and acts as a neutral party in dispute resolution activities." How can that be, given that its coffers are full of Arab money, and that its focus is away from significant Arab abuses and on Israel's far less serious ones?

No reasonable person can dispute therefore that Jimmy Carter has been and remains dependent on Arab oil money, particularly from Saudi Arabia. Does this mean that Carter has necessarily been influenced in his thinking about the Middle East by receipt of such enormous amounts of money?
Dershowitz concludes with a statement that coincides with my own assessment of Carter's reputation, based on his writings and public speeches, over the last few years:
It pains me to say this, but I now believe that there is no person in American public life today who has a lower ratio of real to apparent integrity than Jimmy Carter. The public perception of his integrity is extraordinarily high. His real integrity, it now turns out, is extraordinarily low. He is no better than so many former American politicians who, after leaving public life, sell themselves to the highest bidder and become lobbyists for despicable causes. That is now Jimmy Carter's sad legacy.
Pretty strong stuff. It'll be interesting to see if Carter attempts an answer.
 
TrackBacks
Return to Main Blog Page
 
 

Previous Comments to this Post 

Comments
Carter also received a million dollar pledge from the Saudi-based bin Laden family,
The bin Laden family is large (something like 52 siblings), and they have a global business empire. OBL is the black sheep, and the only one involved in terrorism. Nonetheless, after 9/11 the moonbat websites were buzzing with conspiracy theories attempting to tie Bush to OBL in order to insinuate that Bush orchestrated the 9/11 attacks. For example, there is the oft-repeated assertion that Bush secretly airlifted the bin Laden family out of the country after 9/11 before they could be interviewed by the FBI. (Actually, it was Bush critic Richard Clarke who made the decision to allow them to leave for their own safety.) Another frequently cited "link" was an old business deal between Bush 41 and one of the bin Laden siblings who died many years prior to the 9/11 attacks.

How ironic then, that it is actually a Democratic former President who has accepted a million dollars from the bin Laden family as an outright gift. Can anyone imagine how the Left and the MSM would be going nuts if this was a Republican?
 
Written By: Aldo
URL: http://
It pains me to say this, but I now believe that there is no person in American public life today who has a lower ratio of real to apparent integrity than Jimmy Carter.
What about Joe Wilson?
 
Written By: Aldo
URL: http://
Yet more evidence, as if any more were needed, that Carter is the highest ranking useful idiot in American history.
 
Written By: Billy Hollis
URL: http://
Pretty strong stuff. It’ll be interesting to see if Carter attempts an answer
He’ll blame the Jew of course
 
Written By: shark
URL: http://
Dershowitz has gone after anyone who criticizes Israel, even respected academics like Mearsheimer and Walts who pointed out the obvious: AIPAC has a lot of clout in Washington. This kind of very lame smear anyone who dares criticize Israel is an effort to offuscate from the facts of the case and play a dishonest lawyer’s game of smear and distract (and, of course, Dershowitz is a talented lawyer). Any attempt to claim that someone as honored, honest and respected as Carter somehow had his position "bought" is contemptible. Q and O’s weaknest moments are when bloggers buy into that kind of "demonize opponents with personal smears" (Gore, Carter, Murtha, Wilson, etc.) That aspect of political discourse — you can’t just disagree with someone, you have to ridicule and demean them in the process — seems to be receding, since I don’t think it works well any more.
 
Written By: Scott Erb
URL: http://faculty.umf.maine.edu/~erb/blog.htm
Erb says
Mearsheimer and Walts [point] out the obvious: AIPAC has a lot of clout in Washington
Mearsheimer and Walt actually say
"The bottom line is that AIPAC, which is a de facto agent for a foreign government, has a stranglehold on the U.S. Congress."
and that
"the United States has been willing to set aside its own security in order to advance the interests of [Israel]"
I’m not surprised, though, to see Erb attempt to "distract" from the actual point of the post by claiming Dershowitz is attempting to "distract" us from the greatness of Carter.

You see, Erb can believe that everyone else might sacrifice American interests because of "The Lobby," but it’s ridiculous to suggest that Carter would do so based on Arab interests.

Maybe Erb should consider that Carter isn’t "bought" so much as he is being paid handsomely by Israel’s enemies to advocate that which he already believes.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
...even respected academics like Mearsheimer and Walts...
well at least respected by those like Carter, and evidently you, who have already bought into their ’theories.’
Q and O’s weaknest moments are when bloggers buy into that kind of "demonize opponents with personal smears"
Yet, this is exactly what you just did with Dershowitz, Scott. Revealing how your metric changes depending upon whom you are talking about.
 
Written By: bains
URL: http://
If anyone who reads this site regularly is still surprised that Scott Erb is a liberal Anti-American hypocrite of the first water....
 
Written By: SDN
URL: http://
This piece by Dershowitz is a hit piece. We know nothing about "The Zayed Centre for Coordination and Follow-up". Alledgedly it has at some time had some speakers who have said some nasty and unsupportable things. Who knows what its overall speaking program is like - it’s goals, general message, etc. It could be a wacky anti-Zionist think tank from top to bottom - or it could not be. Who knows?

We know nothing about Shiekh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan except that he has an Arabic sounding name. So Carter accepted some money from a Saudi Arabian guy who has a think tank that has hosted some people who have said some wacky stuff. That’s an awfully thin hook to hang someone on, considering that the NYTimes has a front page article today about how Prince Bandar gave Colin Powell a Jaguar after he retired while also being the guy who smuggled the Bin Laden family out of the country. See how easy it is to smear by association?

Meanwhile, this paragraph is ridiculous:

The Saudis have apparently bought his silence for a steep price. The bought quality of the Center’s activities becomes even more clear, however, when reviewing the Center’s human rights activities in other countries: essentially no human rights activities in China or in North Korea, or in Iran, Iraq, the Sudan, or Syria, but activity regarding Israel and its alleged abuses, according to the Center’s website.

Like every other NGO in the world, the Carter Center can only have programs where nations allow it to have programs. There is no Carter Center Special Forces to run programs in Saudi Arabia. The Carter Center does a ton of fantastic work, most recently in the Venezuelan elections, and I believe in Nigeria as well for its very recent elections. This is, straight up, a magnificently unfair and dishonest picture of the Carter Center’s activities. Go to their website yourself and find out.

Whether Carter has gone too far in his criticisms of Israel’s human rights record is something with which reasonable people can disagree: but Dershowitz is a very smart and deeply intellectually dishonest hack who succeeds in making the Carter Center look like some sort of Stalinist organization with one damning-sounding but thinly-backgrounded factual hook and and awful lot of smear by misleading context.

 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
Erb states that Dershowitz has "gone after" Mearsheimer and Walt and then talks about Dershowitz’s use of the "smear."

Does anyone really think Erb will bother to explain how Dershowitz smeared Mearsheimer and Walt?

Here is the Dershowitz paper in response to them:
http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/research/working_papers/dershowitzreply.pdf

As far as Carter being smeared, I wonder what definition Erb uses for "smear." I’m familiar with the term being used to mean slander. Does Erb have some knowledge that Carter is not being paid like Dershowitz claims?

I also wonder how "The Truth Hurts" Erb justifies his acceptance that today’s American military is the most "violent and murderous" army in our history while also claiming that others are buying into a smear campaign against Carter.

Erb is pathetic as usual.

Do you wonder if he points his students to these criticisms like he points them to his own blog? Do his students even know what kind of ill-informed and inconsistant mind they must tolerate?
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
We know nothing about "The Zayed Centre for Coordination and Follow-up".
http://www.memri.org/bin/articles.cgi?Page=archives&Area=sr&ID=SR01603

http://www.memri.org/bin/articles.cgi?Page=archives&Area=sr&ID=SR1803

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2003/08/31/harvard_must_give_back_tainted_money/
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
We know nothing about Shiekh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan except that he has an Arabic sounding name. So Carter accepted some money from a Saudi Arabian guy who has a think tank that has hosted some people who have said some wacky stuff.
I’m sure you’re just as forgiving about a Republican speaking at Bob Jones University, right?

And it wouldn’t be so bad if a Republican took money from the KKK, would it? I mean, it’s a group that has hostes some pretty wacky speakers...

 
Written By: steverino
URL: http://steverino.journalspace.com/
”…the NYTimes has a front page article today about how Prince Bandar gave Colin Powell a Jaguar after he retired while also being the guy who smuggled the Bin Laden family out of the country. See how easy it is to smear by association?”
Although it is refreshing to see a liberal admitting that the NYT smears people by association (and on its front page, too) I don’t see the relevance to the issue at hand.
 
Written By: notherbob2/robert fulton
URL: http://
thank you very nice topic, thanks :)
 
Written By: emlak
URL: http://emlak.royalgrup.com
http://www.cartercenter.org/news/publications/election_reports.html -

This is a list of the reports produced by the Carter Center on elections worldwide in the past seven years. China is prominently featured. Is that the first outright lie of Dershowitz’ piece? Could he even be bothered to check his facts?

McQ, if you cared a fig about educating your audience, rather than front-paging incredulous smears of the Carter Center, you’d have made an attempt to look around the Center’s own website yourself. It’s insultingly obvious that the Carter Center’s agenda is in no way focused on Israel. So I’ll do it for you:




Print This Page E-mail This Page

Election Reports

Bangladesh
China
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Dominican Republic
East Timor
Ethiopia
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Indonesia
Israel and The Palestinian Territories
Jamaica
Kenya
Liberia
Mali
Mexico
Mozambique
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Peru
Sierra Leone
United States
Venezuela
Zambia







Bangladesh



5 Oct 2001
Postelection Statement by Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter on Bangladesh Elections, Oct. 5, 2001
When I visited Bangladesh in August, I was impressed with the evenhanded, impartial preparations for the election being made by the caretaker government and the electoral authorities, laying the foundation for free and fair elections.



4 Aug 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Bangladesh Elections, Aug. 1, 2001 [PDF]
This statement is offered by the joint National Democratic Institute (NDI)/Carter Center pre-election delegation to Bangladesh’s 2001 parliamentary elections.





China



8 Jul 2002
The Carter Center’s Yawei Liu Talks About Democratic Elections in China [PDF]
Yawei Liu, Associate Director of the China Village Elections Project of The Carter Center, spoke to the Congressional-Executive Commission on China during a July 8, 2002 Roundtable on Village Elections in China. Read the transcript of his statement.



14 Jan 1999
Postelection Statement on China Township Elections, Jan. 14, 1999
At the invitation of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Standing Committee of the National Peoples’ Congress (NPC) of the People’s Republic of China, an eight-person delegation from The Carter Center observed direct elections for township people’s congress (TPC) representatives and indirect elections for township government officials in Chongqing municipality in southwest China between January 8-13, 1999.



16 Mar 1998
Postelection Statement on China Village Elections, March 16, 1998 [PDF]
At the invitation of the government of the People’s Republic of China,The Carter Center sent a delegation to observe village elections in China from March 2-15, 1998.



5 Mar 1997
Postelection Statement on China Village Elections, March 5, 1997 [PDF]
At China’s invitation, The Carter Center sent a seven-person, international team led by Dr. Robert Pastor, a Carter Center Fellow and expert on elections, to observe the village electoral process in Fujian and Hebei provinces.





Democratic Republic of the Congo



31 Jul 2006
International Delegation Observes Historic Democratic Republic of Congo Elections
The Democratic Republic of Congo held its first presidential and legislative multi-party elections in 40 years on Sunday, July 30. A Carter Center election observation delegation participated in this historic event, with its 58-member international team deployed throughout the country to monitor polling sites, the voting process, and final tabulations. An official statement will be distributed following an Aug. 1 Carter Center press conference in Kinshasa.



21 Jul 2006
Press Release on DRC Elections (English & French)
Former Prime Minister of Canada Joe Clark and Carter Center Associate Executive Director for Peace Programs John Stremlau will lead a 58-member international delegation to observe the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) presidential and legislative elections. The Carter Center was invited by the Independent Electoral Commission and welcomed by all major political parties to observe the July 30 elections.



12 Jul 2006
Second Carter Center Statement on the Election Preparations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (English and French)
The presidential and legislative election campaigns are now slowly underway across the country. While there has been an improvement in the quality of the information put out by political parties and candidates, there is still a tendency to politicize and sensationalize relatively straight-forward technical issues and unjustly undermine confidence in the electoral process.



6 Jun 2006
First Carter Center Pre-Election Statement on Preparations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (English and French)
The Carter Center’s international election observation mission to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is pleased to release its first pre-election statement on the 2006 presidential and legislative elections.



2 May 2006
The Carter Center Deploys Election Observers in Democratic Republic of Congo (English and French)
The Carter Center has launched an international observation mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), with the deployment this week of seven long-term observers in four provinces around the country.





Dominican Republic



18 May 2000
Postelection Statement on Dominican Republic Elections, May 18, 2000
The International Observer Delegation sponsored by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and The Carter Center offers this Preliminary Statement on the May 16, 2000 presidential elections in the Dominican Republic.





East Timor



1 Apr 2004
East Timor Political and Election Observation Project [PDF]
Final Project Report: The East Timor Political and Election Observation Project, The Carter Center, Special Report Series.



15 Apr 2002
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, April 15, 2002
The Carter Center observers witnessed a successful election day in an election that clearly met international standards for freeness and fairness. In the post-election period, democratic development will be needed at all levels of government down to the grassroots if East Timor is to succeed as a democratic nation. It is the responsibility of Timorese civil society and the elected government, with the full support of the international community, to work toward this end.

12 Apr 2002
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, April 12, 2002
The Carter Center re-opened a field office in East Timor in May 2001 for the long-term observation of the Aug. 30, 2001 Constituent Assembly elections and the subsequent constitution drafting process. Carter Center long-term observers were deployed again to East Timor in March 2002 to monitor the pre-electoral environment in the lead-up to the territory’s first Presidential elections scheduled to take place April 14, 2002. Short-term advisors also have arrived and been deployed, with a delegation of 15 observers who will cover 11 districts on election day. Center observers have visited 12 of the 13 Districts in East Timor, meeting with representatives of political parties, East Timorese non-governmental groups, domestic monitoring groups, and community members in the 12 districts. The following is a summary report of observer findings.



1 Sep 2001
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Sept. 1, 2001
We would like to commend the people of Timor Lorosa’e for their massive and peaceful participation in the August 30 elections and congratulate the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) and the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET), which worked hard for an efficient and peaceful electoral process.



31 Aug 2001
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 31, 2001
The calm, peaceful, orderly voting and extremely high voter turnout yesterday were impressive signs of the Timorese people’s determination to exercise their right to democratic self-government.


23 Aug 2001
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 23, 2001
Carter Center observers have monitored the pre-election environment in East Timor since June 2001.


1 Jun 2000
Final Report on the 1999 Public Consultation Process in East Timor [PDF]
Observing the 1999 Public Consultation Process in East Timor, Final Report.



10 Feb 2000
Transition to a Democratic and Independent East Timor: Statement by The Carter Center to the U.S. Congress, 2000
Statement by Charles E. Costello, the Carter Center’s Democracy Program director, to the Joint Hearing of the House and Senate on East Timor.



22 Sep 1999
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Sept. 22, 1999
The carefully planned campaign of violence and terror carried out by the Indonesian security forces and their militia surrogates in East Timor and in West Timor over the past several weeks has spread throughout Indonesia.


13 Sep 1999
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Sept. 13, 1999
The Carter Center is encouraged by the decision of the Indonesian government to allow the deployment of an international peacekeeping force in East Timor. However, the Indonesian military and police, with the assistance of their militia surrogates, continue to murder and terrorize the people of East Timor, destroying buildings and infrastructure and forcibly expelling tens of thousands of unarmed civilians from the territory.


6 Sep 1999
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Sept. 6, 1999
The Carter Center has been forced by militia attacks in East Timor to evacuate its remaining three international staff members from the territory. Their reports from Jakarta of the events they witnessed just prior to leaving the East Timor capital of Dili conclusively show complicity of Indonesian forces, both police and military, with the armed gangs terrorizing and displacing the local East Timorese populace. This includes militias’ efforts to drive international observers, journalists, and U.N. staff out of East Timor.


1 Sep 1999
Postelection Statement on East Timor Elections, Sept. 1, 1999
The popular consultation on the future of East Timor, held Aug. 30, 1999, was marred by numerous instances of intimidation and violence prior to the vote. Nevertheless, on balloting day eligible voters turned out in impressively large numbers—more than 95 percent according to preliminary reports—to express their opinion in a well-administered and largely peaceful exercise.



23 Aug 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 22, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the popular consultation process on autonomy in East Timor. Ten Carter Center observers have been traveling throughout East Timor since July 4 to assess preparations for the vote, the security environment, and the fairness of the campaign, while remaining strictly neutral and nonpartisan. The following is the sixth in a series of weekly reports to be issued by The Carter Center observer mission before and after the consultation.



17 Aug 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 16, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the popular consultation process on autonomy in East Timor. Ten Carter Center observers have been traveling throughout East Timor since July 4 to assess preparations for the vote, the security environment, and the fairness of the campaign, while remaining strictly neutral and nonpartisan. The following is the fifth in a series of weekly reports to be issued by The Carter Center observer mission before and after the consultation.


11 Aug 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 8, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the public consultation process on autonomy in East Timor through neutral, nonpartisan observers assessing preparations for the vote, the security environment, and the fairness of the campaign. Following is the second in a series of weekly reports to be issued by The Carter Center observer mission before and after the consultation.


4 Aug 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, Aug. 1, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the public consultation process on autonomy in East Timor. The Carter Center opened an office in Dili on July 4.



27 Jul 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, July 25, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the public consultation process on autonomy in East Timor through neutral, nonpartisan observers assessing preparations for the vote, the security environment, and the fairness of the campaign. Following is the second in a series of weekly reports to be issued by The Carter Center observer mission before and after the consultation.


20 Jul 1999
Pre-Election Statement on East Timor Elections, July 17, 1999
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center are closely monitoring the public consultation process on autonomy in East Timor. The Center opened an office with two observers in Dili on July 4.





Ethiopia



15 Sep 2005
Ethiopia 2005 National Elections: Final Statement on The Carter Center Observations, Sept. 15, 2005 [PDF]
The Carter Center was pleased to accept the invitation of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to observe the 2005 parliamentary elections in Ethiopia. The May 15 elections were for 524 of the country’s 547 constituency-based seats in the national parliament. The remaining 23 seats in the Somali region were elected separately in votes held on August 21.

9 Jun 2005
Carter Center Postelection Statement on the Ethiopia Elections, June 9, 2005
The Carter Center joins other members of the international community and Ethiopian citizens in expressing its deep alarm and sorrow at the violence, injuries, deaths, and violations of human rights that have occurred since 6 June in Addis Ababa and elsewhere in Ethiopia in the aftermath of the 15 May national elections.



3 Jun 2005
Postelection Statement on Ethiopia Elections, June 3, 2005
The Carter Center’s May 16 postelection statement, based on observations of the polling process in Addis Ababa and selected locations in eight regions, expressed some concerns and noted that for the first time in history the majority of Ethiopian voters were presented with choices when they went to the polls.



19 May 2005
Ethiopia Elections: Jimmy Carter Trip Report, Postelection Statement
The Carter Center thanks the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia for its invitation to observe the May 15, 2005, national elections and all those who welcomed us and took the time to contribute to our understanding of Ethiopian politics and the electoral process.





Guatemala



30 Dec 2003
Postelection Statement on Guatemala Elections, Dec. 30, 2003
Carter Center representatives observed the second round of national elections in Guatemala on Dec. 28, 2003, in the departments of El Quiché, San Marcos, Totonicapán, Huehuetenango, and Suchitepéquez. The Center congratulates president-elect Oscar Berger and expresses the hope that his government will prioritize full implementation of the 1996 Peace Accords, particularly strengthening the rule of law within the framework of fundamental human rights.

19 Dec 2003
Postelection Statement on Guatemala Elections, Dec. 19, 2003
This is the second statement of the Carter Center’s electoral mission in Guatemala since the arrival of the observation team on Oct. 20, 2003.



19 Dec 2003
Declaracion post electoral sobre las elecciones en Guatemala, diciembre de 19 del 2003
Este es el segundo informe difundido por la misión electoral del Centro Carter desde la llegada del equipo de observación el 20 de octubre de 2003.



3 Nov 2003
Pre-Election Statement on Guatemala Elections, Nov. 3, 2003 (English and Spanish)
A Carter Center election observation team, including four international observers, a human rights expert, and a campaign finance expert, established an office in Guatemala on Oct. 21, 2003, to begin monitoring the Nov. 9 presidential, congressional, and municipal electoral process.





Guyana



1 Feb 2002
Observing The 2001 Guyana Elections [PDF]
The electoral process in Guyana has made significant progress since the Carter Center’s first involvement in the early 1990s.



21 Mar 2001
Postelection Statement on Guyana Elections, March 21, 2001
On March 20, 2001, the day after the March 19 elections in Guyana, The Carter Center issued a preliminary statement about the electoral process.



20 Mar 2001
Postelection Statement on Guyana Elections, March 20, 2001
The Carter Center would like to commend the Guyanese people for their conduct and participation in yesterday’s elections and present this preliminary statement on the electoral process.





Haiti



1 Mar 1995
Assessment Mission to Haiti (March 1995) [PDF]
Report on the Elections in Haiti, June 25, 1995, by Robert Pastor.



1 Jan 1995
Assessment Mission to Haiti (January 1995) [PDF]
Report on the Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government’s December 1994 mission to assess Haiti’s political and economic climate and to explore opportunities to assist with economic development.





Indonesia



1 Jun 2005
The Carter Center 2004 Indonesia Election Report , June 1, 2005 [PDF]
The final report of the Carter Center on the 2004 legislative and presidential elections in Indonesia.



22 Sep 2004
Postelection Statement on Indonesia Election, Sept. 22, 2004
The second round of Indonesia’s historic first direct presidential election has taken place successfully, in a general atmosphere of calm, order, and open participation. The Carter Center congratulates the people and leaders of Indonesia for the successful conduct of the presidential election and for the peaceful atmosphere that has prevailed throughout Indonesia’s three rounds of elections in 2004. This represents a major step in the country’s ongoing democratic transition.



2 Aug 2004
Postelection Statement on Indonesia Elections, Aug. 2, 2004
In support of Indonesia’s ongoing democratization and political reform, The Carter Center is continuing to monitor this election, as Indonesian voters for the first time directly choose their president. The Carter Center was invited by the election commission (KPU) and welcomed by all major political parties.



7 Jul 2004
Postelection Statement on Indonesia Elections, July 7, 2004 (English and Bahasa)
In support of Indonesia’s ongoing democratization and political reform, The Carter Center is pleased to observe this historic election, as Indonesian voters for the first time directly choose their president. The Carter Center, which observed the 1999 national elections, was invited by the election commission (KPU) and welcomed by all major political parties.

25 Jun 2004
Pre-Election Statement on Indonesia Elections, June 25, 2004
In support of Indonesia’s ongoing process of democratization and political reform, The Carter Center is pleased to witness the historic 2004 election, when Indonesian voters for the first time will directly choose their president.





Israel and The Palestinian Territories



26 Jan 2006
Prelminary Statement of the NDI/Carter Center International Observer Delegation to the Palestinian Legislative Council Elections
This preliminary statement on the January 25, 2006 Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC) elections is offered by the international observer delegation organized by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) in partnership with The Carter Center.



6 Jan 2006
Palestinian Legislative Council Elections: Pre-Election Assessment Statement of The Carter Center/National Democratic Institute [PDF]
An assessment by The Carter Center and the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI)of the pre-election environment, including technical preparations and the political context, ahead of the Palestinian Legislative Council elections scheduled for January 25.(PDF) Pre-election assessment, January 6.



15 Apr 2005
National Democratic Institute Final Report on the Palestinian Presidential Election, Jan. 9, 2005 [PDF]
The final National Democratic Institute report on the Palestinian presidential election held Jan. 9, 2005. The Carter Center participated with NDI in their election observations.



10 Jan 2005
Preliminary Statement of the NDI and Carter Center International Election Observer Delegation to the Jan. 9, 2005, Palestinian Presidential Election, Jan. 10, 2005 [PDF]
The Preliminary Statement of the NDI and Carter Center International Election Observer Delegation to the Jan. 9, 2005 Palestinian Presidential Election, released Jan. 10, 2005.



22 Dec 2004
Statement of the National Democratic Institute Pre-Election Assessment Mission to the 2005 Palestinian Presidential Elections [PDF]
This statement has been prepared by a pre-election assessment team organized by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) in partnership with The Carter Center. The delegation examined technical preparations and the political environment leading up to the presidential election in the West Bank and Gaza, currently scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 9, 2005.





Jamaica



5 Jun 2003
Observing the 2002 Jamaica Parliamentary Elections [PDF]
Observing the 2002 Jamaica Parliamentary Elections: Final Report.



18 Oct 2002
Postelection Statement on Jamaica Elections, Oct. 18, 2002
We commend the Jamaican voters for participating peacefully in an election day that was generally free of the violence marring it in the past. The Jamaican people made a clear call for change in the culture of violence, and the candidates have responded. We commend the leaders of the parties for their gracious and statesmanlike speeches last night, for their calls to work together for the good of the country, and for their joint pre-election statement calling for a peaceful election.



7 Oct 2002
Pre-Election Statement on Jamaican Elections, Oct. 7, 2002
The Carter Center, as part of its continuing observation of the Jamaica electoral process, would like to offer the following interim comments. These are based on the findings of 12 international medium term observers, who have monitored the electoral process in 24 constituencies throughout the island since nomination day, September 30.



27 Aug 2002
Pre-Election Statement on Jamaica Elections, Aug. 27, 2002
The Carter Center’s second statement on the 2002 parliamentary elections in Jamaica.



31 May 2002
Pre-Election Statement on Jamacia Elections, May 31, 2002
A statement from the Carter Center’s pre-election delegation to Jamaica’s upcoming Parliamentary elections, including observations from the team’s initial visit May 26 - May 31, 2002.



1 Feb 2002
Fostering Transparency and Preventing Corruption in Jamaica [PDF]
Fostering Transparency and Preventing Corruption in Jamaica is a guide for Jamaican citizens and is a Carter Center collaboration with experts from Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa,the United States and colleagues from Jamaica.





Kenya



26 Jun 2003
Observing the 2002 Kenya Elections [PDF]
Observing the 2002 Kenya Elections: Final Report (pdf format), published May, 2002.



29 Dec 2002
Postelection Statement on Kenya Elections, Dec. 29, 2002
The Carter Center is pleased to have observed Kenya’s presidential, parliamentary, and civic elections on 27 December.





Liberia



14 Dec 2005
2005 Liberian National Elections: Carter Center/NDI Interim Post-Election Statement
The Nov. 10 preliminary statement issued by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) / Carter Center international observer delegation provided a generally positive overall assessment of the process up to that point.



10 Nov 2005
Liberian Presidential Runoff Election: Preliminary Statement of the NDI/Carter Center International Observer Delegation, Nov. 10, 2005 [PDF]
This statement is offered by the 28-member multinational delegation jointly organized by NDI and The Carter Center. The delegation was co-led by His Excellency Dr. Alex Ekwueme, former Vice-President of the Republic of Nigeria; Dr. Christopher Fomunyoh, NDI’s Senior Associate for Africa; and Dr. David Carroll, Director of the Democracy Program at The Carter Center. The delegation included elected officials, electoral and human rights experts, regional specialists and political and civic leaders from Africa, Europe and North America.



13 Oct 2005
Preliminary Statement of the NDI/Carter Center International Observer Delegation to the 2005 Liberia Elections, Oct. 13, 2005 [PDF]
This statement is offered by the 40-member multinational delegation jointly organized by NDI and The Carter Center. The delegation was co-led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former President of Benin Nicéphore Soglo. The delegation included elected officials, electoral and human rights experts, regional specialists and political and civic leaders from 14 countries in Africa, Europe and North America.



6 Oct 2005
Arrival Statement by the National Democratic Institute/Carter Center Observer Delegation to the 2005 Liberia Elections, Oct. 6, 2005
The National Democratic Institute (NDI) and The Carter Center today announced the arrival of their delegation to observe the October 11 presidential and legislative elections in Liberia. The 38-member multinational delegation is co-led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former President of Benin, Nicephore Soglo. The delegation will include elected officials, electoral and human rights experts, regional specialists and political and civic leaders from 13 countries in North America, Europe and Africa.



27 Sep 2005
Liberia Elections: Read Pre-Election Statement, Election Watch Reports
A Carter Center staff team conducted an assessment Aug. 11-17, 2005 of electoral conditions at the start of the campaign for Liberia’s October 11 elections. The team found that despite enormous logistical challenges and post-conflict conditions, electoral preparedness appears good at this juncture, and the prospects for a competitive election seem high.



9 Sep 2005
Statement of The NDI/Carter Center Pre-Election Delegation to Liberia’s 2005 Elections
This statement is offered by an international pre-election delegation to Liberia, organized jointly by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and The Carter Center. From September 1 through 9, 2005, the delegation assessed the political environment in Liberia in advance of the October 11 presidential and legislative elections. The delegation met with a broad spectrum of Liberian political and civic leaders, government officials, electoral authorities and representatives of the international community in Monrovia. In addition, the delegation traveled outside Monrovia to Bomi, Bong and Grand Bassa Counties, and was informed by in-country staff members and long-term observers who have visited all 15 counties in recent months.



1 Sep 2005
First Carter Center Pre-Election Report on Liberia National Elections (PDF), October 2005, Aug. 30, 2005 [PDF]
Note: This report is supplementary to the Carter Center’s "Pre-Election Statement on the 2005 Liberia National Elections," released on August 28, 2005. It is intended to be read together with the statement, providing additional observations and details. In support of Liberia’s transition from more than two decades of recurring civil conflict to reconciliation and reconstruction, The Carter Center is pleased to contribute to the Oct, 11, 2005, presidential and legislative elections as international observers. These elections are an essential element in the process towards sustainable peace, as expressed in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed in Accra in Aug. 2003.





Mali



15 Nov 2002
Observing The 2002 Mali Presidential Elections: Final Report [PDF]
The Final Report by The Carter Center of the 2002 Mali Presidential Election.



7 Jun 2002
Postelection Statement on Mali Elections, June 7, 2002
This is the Carter Center’s second and final public statement on the 2002 presidential elections in Mali. The Center conveyed its preliminary observations of the first round of the presidential elections in an interim statement issued on May 7. This final statement summarizes the Center’s overall impressions of Mali’s presidential elections. A comprehensive report, including recommendations for electoral reform, is forthcoming.



7 May 2002
Postelection Statement on Mali Elections, May 7, 2002
The Carter Center welcomes the completion of the first round of Mali’s 2002 presidential elections. These elections mark an important step in Mali’s democratic transition following the completion of President Alpha Oumar Konare’s two terms in office. Overall, the elections were peaceful, well managed and conducted in a spirit of transparency. The high number of presidential candidates (24) indicates significant enthusiasm for multiparty electoral competition but also the highly personalized character of politics in Mali. The general atmosphere during the electoral campaign was positive and there were no reports of intimidation before or on election day. However, the conduct of some elements of the electoral process has generated concerns about the accuracy and reliability of the reported results.





Mexico



1 Mar 2001
Observing the 2000 Mexico Elections [PDF]
The Carter Center has a long history of engagement with Mexico with the shared goal of improving the electoral system in that country.



2 Jul 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Mexico Election, July 2, 2000
At the invitation of the major political parties and the government of Mexico and with the welcome of the Federal Election Institute, the Latin American and the Caribbean Program (LACP) of the Carter Center, representing the Council of Presidents and Prime Ministers, dispatched an exploratory mission to Mexico on June 12-14, 2000 to assess the electoral process and propose a strategy to monitor the elections of July 2nd. Led by Dr. Robert Pastor, former Director of the LACP, and Dr. Shelley McConnell, Associate Director of the LACP, the four-member team met with senior party officials, members of the government, IFE, the Electoral Tribunal, and diplomats.



1 Aug 1994
Observing the 1994 Mexico Elections [PDF]
The final report on the 1994 Mexico Elections by The Carter Center.





Mozambique



1 Oct 2005
Observing the 2004 Mozambique Elections [PDF]
The final Carter Center report on the Dec. 1-2, 2004, Mozambique elections.



1 Oct 2005
OBSERVAÇÃO DAS ELEIÇÕES DE MOÇAMBIQUE 2004 [PDF]
OBSERVAÇÃO DAS ELEIÇÕES DE MOÇAMBIQUE 2004, OUTUBRO 2005.



26 Jan 2005
Postelection Statement on Mozambique Elections, Jan. 26, 2005 (English and Portuguese)
The Carter Center recognizes the overall results and congratulates the elected Frelimo President Armando Emílio Guebuza. However, the Center concludes the National Elections Commission (CNE) has not administered a fair and transparent election in all parts of Mozambique. Political parties must also be held accountable since it is their representatives in the CNE and the Technical Secretariat for Election Administration (STAE) who are responsible for the overall success or failure of the elections. The Center has attempted to observe and assess as much of the verification process as possible but has been hindered by a lack of cooperation by the CNE.



21 Dec 2004
Postelection Statement on Mozambique Elections, Dec. 21, 2004 (English and Portuguese)
Continuing its observation of the Dec. 1-2 presidential and legislative elections, The Carter Center has monitored the tabulation of results in provincial capitals and the reclassification of invalid votes at the National Elections Commission (CNE) in Maputo. The Center has followed several issues since the election days that were of concern, including the arrest of Renamo representatives in the Manica, Niassa, and Nampula provinces, delayed poll openings in rural areas of Zambezia, and low voter turnout. The Center will maintain its presence in Mozambique until the conclusion of the elections and then will publish a comprehensive report.



4 Dec 2004
Postelection Statement on Mozambique Elections, Dec. 4, 2004 (English and Portuguese)
The Carter Center was invited by the National Election Commission (CNE) and welcomed by all major political parties to observe the Dec. 1 – 2 elections. The Center observed the 1999 and 2003 elections, and has been engaged in initiatives in Mozambique, including support for the Agenda 2025 national consensus-building initiative and agriculture production technologies through SG2000.



15 Nov 2004
Carter Center to Observe 2004 Mozambican Presidential Elections (English and Portuguese)
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, his wife, Rosalynn, and former Benin President Nicéphore Soglo will lead a 60-member international delegation to observe Mozambique’s presidential and legislative elections. The Carter Center, which observed the 1999 national elections and the 2003 municipal elections, was invited by the National Election Commission and welcomed by all major political parties to observe the Dec. 1 - 2 elections.



1 Sep 2004
The Carter Center Report on the Mozambique Voter Registration Update, June 28 to July 15, 2004 [PDF]
The Carter Center Report on the Mozambique Voter Registration Update, June 28 to July 15, 2004.



1 Sep 2004
Relatório do Carter Center sobre a Actualização do Recenseamento Eleitoral de Moçambique, 28 de Junho– 15 de Julho de 2004 [PDF]
Relatório do Carter Center sobre a Actualização do Recenseamento Eleitoral de Moçambique, 28 de Junho–15 de Julho de 2004.



26 Jul 2004
Pre-Election Statement on Mozambique Elections, July 26, 2004 (English and Portuguese)
In response to an invitation issued by the National Elections Commission (CNE), The Carter Center observed the voter registration update in Mozambique from June 28 to July 15. With observers from five countries-Belgium, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Guinea-Conakry, and the United States-The Carter Center visited 151 registration brigades in nine provinces.

1 Mar 2004
Final Report: Observing the 2003 Mozambique Municipal Elections [PDF]
The final report from The Carter Center on the 2003 Mozambique municipal elections.



1 Mar 2004
Eleicoes Autarquicas Mocambique (Final Report: Observing the 2003 Mozambique Municipal Elections, Portuguese version)
Relatorio de Observacao Eleitoral



20 Jan 2004
Postelection Statement on Mozambique Elections, Jan. 20, 2004 (English and Portuguese)
The Carter Center welcomes the Jan.15, 2004, Constitutional Council of Mozambique announcement of final results for the Nov. 2003 municipal elections.



21 Nov 2003
Postelection Statement on Mozambique Elections, Nov. 21, 2003 (English and Portuguese)
Mozambique’s second municipal elections were generally well conducted and peaceful. The National Election Commission (CNE), the Technical Secretariat for Electoral Administration (STAE), and local polling staff are to be congratulated for the conduct of all aspects of the polling process on election day. Party delegates from two or more candidates or party lists were present in most polling stations. The participation of candidates from nine smaller parties and six civic groups, in addition to those of the ruling Frelimo party and main opposition Renamo-Electoral Union coalition, speaks to the desire for spirited multiparty competition in Mozambique’s 33 municipalities.



1 Aug 2000
Observing the 1999 Elections in Mozambique, Final Report [PDF]
After critical first elections supporting both war-to-peace transitions and a move to democracy, a country’s second election often presents even greater challenges.



1 Jan 2000
Sumário Executivo [PDF]
Mozambique Executive Summary



1 Aug 1999
Observing the 1999 Elections in Mozambique, Final Report (Portuguese) [PDF]
Process of Observation the Election of 1999, in Mozambique, Final Report(Portuguese).





Nicaragua



7 Jul 2006
Jimmy Carter’s Nicaragua Trip Report: July 3-6, 2006
Returning to Nicaragua was almost like going home. The troubled nation presented an important political issue with the overthrow of the dictator Somoza during my administration as president, followed by the fragmentation of the revolutionary front into competing political factions that resulted in the election of the leftist Sandinistas in 1984. During the past two decades Rosalynn and I have been involved in many visits, beginning with an ambitious Habitat for Humanity home building project in the northwest region in the mid-1980s. It was remarkable in that we were able to build homes for ten-person families for only $300, using local clays for bricks and roofing tile and local mahogany for roof trusses.



6 Jul 2006
Jimmy Carter Holds Nicaragua Press Conference
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, with experts from The Carter Center, held a press conference here July 6 at 10 a.m. in the InterContinental Metrocentro Hotel. The event concluded several days of meetings with Nicaragua’s presidential and vice presidential candidates, election officials, and civil society groups by President Carter, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, and top Carter Center staff.



6 Jul 2006
Press Release on Nicaraguan Elections (English & Spanish)
Rosalynn and I have spent three days in Managua learning about the election process, accompanied by the Director of the Americas Program at The Carter Center Dr. Jennifer McCoy, Senior Associate Director Dr. Shelley McConnell, our new Chief of Mission for the Nicaraguan Elections Dr. Jaime Aparicio, and our political analyst David Dye.



21 Jun 2006
The Carter Center Observes Nicaragua’s Voter Registration Verification Process (English and Spanish)
The Carter Center sent a group of 11 experts from Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ireland, the UK, and the U.S. to Nicaragua for the purpose of observing citizen verification of the voting rolls during the weekend of June 17 and 18, 2006.



15 Jun 2006
Message to the Nicaraguan Electorate Encouraging Participation in the Verification Process (Spanish and English)
En los próximos días Los ciudadanos nicaragüenses tendrán la oportunidad de participar en un proceso de verificación en el que confirmarán personalmente que sus nombres se incluyen en el padrón electoral de las elecciones de noviembre.



10 May 2006
Third Report on the Nicaraguan Pre-Election Process (Spanish and English)
The Carter Center is pleased to announce that former U.S. President Jimmy Carter will visit Nicaragua from July 3-5, 2006, to assess the progress of preparations for that country’s national election on November 5. During his stay, President Carter will meet with Nicaragua’s electoral and governmental authorities to discuss possible modalities for a Carter Center election observation mission. He will also meet with the entire spectrum of participants in this year’s election, along with Nicaraguan civil society organizations and both national and international observers.



23 Feb 2006
Communiqué on Nicaragua’s Pre-Election Climate (Spanish and English)
In response to an invitation extended by the seven members of the Supreme Electoral Council, The Carter Center announced today that it is sending a small contingent of observers to the regional elections on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua, scheduled for March 5, 2006. The elections for Atlantic Coast regional councils are critically important for strengthening the process of regional autonomy and therefore of democracy, and are of importance to all Nicaraguans.



7 Feb 2006
Carter Center Report on Pre-Election Delegation Visit to Nicaragua, Jan. 31-Feb. 2, 2006 (Spanish and English)
En enero de 2006, El Centro Carter recibió del Presidente del Consejo Supremo Electoral, el Dr. Roberto Rivas, una invitación para observar las elecciones regionales y nacionales a realizarse en Nicaragua en los meses de marzo y noviembre del 2006. In January 2006, The Carter Center received from the President of the Supreme Electoral Council (CSE), Dr. Roberto Rivas, an invitation to observe Nicaragua’s regional and national elections to be held in March and November 2006 respectively.



1 Apr 2002
Observing The 2001 Nicaraguan Elections [PDF]
Nicaragua’s Supreme Electoral Council invited The Carter Center to monitor the 2001 national elections as we had done in 1990 and 1996.



1 Apr 2002
Observando Las Elecciones Nicaraguenses de 2001 [PDF]
El Centro Carter tiene una amplisima experiencia en la observacion de elecciones en todo el mundo, sin embargo la profundidad y la duracion de nuestro compromiso con Nicaragua hacen de ese pais un caso especial.



7 Nov 2001
Declaración post electoral sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, noviembre de 7 del 2001 [PFD]
El 4 de noviembre, los nicaragüenses acudieron masivamente a las urnas para elegir un nuevo presidente y vice presidente, diputados de la Asamblea Nacional y representantes ante el Parlamento Centroamericano. El Centro Carter monitoreó las elecciones de 2001 respondiendo a una invitación del Consejo Supremo Electoral (CSE) y alentado por los partidos políticos y grupos cívicos.



7 Nov 2001
Postelection Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Nov. 7, 2001 [PDF]
Nicaraguans went to the polls in large numbers Sunday, November 4 to elect a new president and vice president, members of the National Assembly, and representatives to the Central American Parliament. The Carter Center monitored the election at the invitation of the Supreme Electoral Council (CSE) and with the encouragement of political parties and civic groups.



3 Nov 2001
Declaración del ex-Presidente de los Estados Unidos Jimmy Carter sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, noviembre de 3 del 2001 [PDF]
Por tercera vez el Centro Carter se encuentra aquí para observar unas elecciones nacionales. En cada ocasión, el pueblo nicaragüense nos ha ofrecido una cálida bienvenida. Hemos sido testigos del crecimiento de la democracia en este hermoso país.



3 Nov 2001
Pre-Election Statement by Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter on Nicaragua Elections, Nov. 3, 2001 [PDF]
The Carter Center is here for the third time to observe national elections, and the Nicaraguan people have always welcomed us. We have witnessed the growth of democracy in this beautiful country.



1 Nov 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Nov. 1, 2001 [PDF]
As the election campaign comes to a close and Nicaraguans enter a period of reflection in preparation for voting Sunday, The Carter Center wishes to report the following electoral developments.



1 Nov 2001
Declaracion pre-electoral sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, noviembre de 1 del 2001 [PDF]
Ahora que llega a su fin la campana electoral y los nicaragüenses entran a un periodo de reflexión antes de emitir su este domingo, el Centro Carter desea reportar lo siguiente acerca de los mas recientes acontecimientos relacionados con las elecciones:



3 Oct 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Oct. 3, 2001 [PDF]
The Carter Center has been invited by the Supreme Electoral Council to observe the national elections in Nicaragua scheduled for November 4, 2001. It has organized an election observation mission, and in July sent a first delegation to Managua to undertake an initial evaluation of the electoral process.



24 Sep 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Sept. 24, 2001 [PDF]
In this document, The Carter Center wishes to communicate to the Nicaraguan public its point of view about recent events in the 2001 electoral process, and signal some themes that our second pre-election delegations will explore with the election authorities and political parties during its visit beginning the 27th of this month.



24 Sep 2001
Declaracion pre-electoral sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, septiembre de 24 del 2001[PDF]
A través de este medio, el Centro Carter desea comunicar al público nicaragüense sus puntos de vista sobre los últimos acontecimientos del proceso electoral 2001, y señalar algunos temas que nuestra segunda delegación pre-electoral va a explorar con las autoridades electorales y los partidos politicos en su visita el 27 del presente mes.



16 Jul 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Nicaragua Elections, July 16, 2001 [PDF]
On May 18, 2001, Nicaragua’s Supreme Electoral Council (CSE) extended an invitation to The Carter Center to observe the November 2001 national elections in which the Nicaraguan people will select a president, vice president, deputies to the legislature, and representatives to the Central American Parliament.



1 May 2001
Declaracion pre-electoral sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, mayo de 1 del 2001 [PDF]
El 18 de mayo de 2001 el Consejo Supremo Electoral (CSE) de Nicaragua extendió al Centro Carter una invitación para observar las elecciones nacionales de noviembre de 2001, en las cuales el pueblo nicaragüense elegirá un presidente, un vicepresidente, diputados legislativos, y representantes ante el Parlamento Centroamericano. El Centro Carter aceptó la invitación, y organizó una delegación pre-electoral que visitó Nicaragua durante los días 16-22 de julio de 2001 para evaluar el clima político así como los preparativos para la votación.



1 Nov 2000
Postelection Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Nov. 1, 2001 [PDF]
Responding to an invitation from Nicaragua’s Supreme Electoral Council (CSE), The Carter Center organized a three-part election observation mission to that country in the fall of 2000.



25 Oct 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Oct. 25, 2000
The Carter Center has followed election processes in Nicaragua since 1989, including the January 2000 reform of the electoral law and subsequent reorganization of the Supreme Electoral Council (CSE).



25 Oct 2000
Declaracion pre-electoral sobre las elecciones en Nicaragua, octubre de 25 del 2000
El Centro Carter ha seguido de cerca el desarrollo de los procesos electorales en Nicaragua desde 1989, incluyendo la reforma de la ley electoral EN enero del 2000 y la subsiguiente reorganización del Consejo Supremo Electoral (CSE).



15 Nov 1996
Postelection Statement on Nicaragua Elections, Nov. 15, 1996
The Carter Center’s electoral observation mission to Nicaragua wishes to express its admiration for the peaceful and civic way in which the people and political parties of Nicaragua have participated in all phases of the vote count process since the Oct. 20 national elections.



1 Jul 1990
Observing Nicaragua’s Elections, 1989-1990(#1, July 1990) [PDF]
Report form the Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government on its election observation process in Nicaragua.





Nigeria



22 Nov 2003
Pre-Election Statement on Nigeria Elections, Nov. 22, 2002 [PDF]
This statement is the product of the National Democratic Institute and The Carter Center pre-election assessment mission that visited Nigeria Nov. 17-22, 2002. To support the work of the delegation, a 13-person advance team of observers visited nine states in all six geo-political zones Nov. 7-15 and conducted more than 100 meetings and interviews. The statement details the delegation¡¯s observations and respectfully includes specific recommendations to stakeholders for ways to improve the conduct of the elections.



28 Mar 2003
Pre-Election Statement on Nigeria Elections, March 28, 2003
This report is the product of a pre-election assessment team organized by The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) and The Carter Center that visited Nigeria March 16-21, 2003.



1 Jun 1999
Observing The 1998-99 Nigeria Elections (Summer 1999) [PDF]
The sudden death of military dictator Gen. Sani Abacha in June 1998 and the positive steps taken towards democracy by his successor, Gen. Abdulsalami Abubakar raised the hopes that Nigeria might end a 15-year period of non-democratic rule. The Carter Center monitored all stages of the transition, culminating in the Feb. 27 presidential election. The report details Nigeria’s troubled past, transition issues, and the monitoring of the elections.



1 Mar 1999
Postelection Statement on Nigeria Elections, March 1, 1999
The Carter Center and the National Democratic Institute (NDI) offer this statement on the February 27 presidential election in Nigeria, to supplement the preliminary statement of February 28.





Peru



4 Jun 2001
Postelection Statement on Peru Elections, June 4, 2001 [PDF]



9 Apr 2001
Declaración post-electoral sobre las elecciones en Peru, abril de 9 de 2001
Esta declaración ha sido elaborada por la Delegación de Observación Electoral Internacional Conjunta del Instituto Nacional Demócrata (NDI)/ Centro Carter al Perú para las elecciones presidenciales y congresales extraordinarias del 8 de Abril de 2001. La Delegación visitó el Perú del 4 al 10 de Abril, incluyó 35 miembros de 11 países, y fue encabezada por el Sr.



9 Apr 2001
Postelection Statement on Peru Elections, April 9, 2001
This statement is offered by the joint National Democratic Institute (NDI)/Carter Center international election observer delegation to Peru’s April 8, 2001, extraordinary presidential and congressional elections.



26 Jan 2001
Declaración pre-electoral sobre las elecciones en Peru, enero de 26 del 2001 [PDF]
Declaración De La Delegación PreElectoral Al Perú Del Instituto Nacional Demócrata (NDI)/Centro Carter.



26 Jan 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Peru Elections, Jan. 26, 2001 [PDF]
This statement is offered by an international pre-election delegation to Peru, organized jointly by the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) and the Carter Center.



1 Jan 2001
Peru 2001 Interim Report [PDF]
Peru’s 2001 elections represented an extraordinary accomplishment in the process of returning Peru to the world community of democracies. Hundreds of thousands of Peruvians helped to ensure the integrity of the election process, sending a clear message of their desire and determination to establish a government based on a democratic electoral mandate.



1 Jan 2001
Peru 2001 Interim Report (Spanish) [PDF]
Las elecciones de Perú del 2001 representaron un logro extraordinario en el proceso de devolver el Perú a la comunidad democrática mundial. Cientos de miles de peruanos ayudaron a asegurar la integridad del proceso electoral, enviando así un mensaje claro de su deseo y determinación de establecer un gobierno basado en un mandato electoral democrático.



25 May 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Peru Elections, May 25, 2000
Since last December, four successive observer missions, sponsored jointly by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the Carter Center, have pointed to fundamental flaws in Peru’s electoral process.



5 May 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Peru Elections, May 5, 2000
This statement is offered by an international pre-election delegation to Peru, organized jointly by the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) and The Carter Center. The delegation visited Peru from April 30 through May 5, 2000. This is the fourth in a series of NDI/Carter Center delegations that have observed Peru’s election process thus far.



24 Mar 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Peru Elections, March 24, 2000
This statement is offered by an international pre-election delegation to Peru, organized jointly by the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and The Carter Center. The delegation visited Peru from March 17 through March 24, 2000. This is the third in a series of NDI/Carter Center delegations that have observed the pre-election period.



11 Feb 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Peru Elections, Feb. 11, 2000
This statement is offered by an international pre-election delegation to Peru, organized jointly by the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) and The Carter Center. The delegation visited Peru from February 7 through February 11, 2000. This is the second in a planned series of three NDI/Carter Center delegations that will observe the pre-election period.



1 Jan 2000
Observing the 2000 Peru Elections, Final Report [PDF]
At the request of Peruvian civic and political leaders, and with an invitation from the Peruvian electoral authorities, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) and The Carter Center (TCC) agreed to organize a comprehensive international monitoring effort focusing first on the critical pre-election period. Prior to the voting on April 9, NDI and The Carter Center organized three high-level pre-election assessment missions and opened a Lima office in January 2000 to provide in-country monitoring of electoral developments.





Sierra Leone

1 May 2003
Observing the 2002 Sierra Leone Elections [PDF]
Observing the 2002 Sierra Leone Elections: Final Report.



3 Jul 2002
2002 Sierra Leone Elections: A Delegate’s Journal
In late April, the message came I’d been waiting for since I retired and began doing volunteer writing projects for The Carter Center two years ago: I was invited to join a team to observe the May 14 presidential and parliamentary elections in Sierra Leone.



16 May 2002
Postelection Statement on Sierra Leone Elections, May 16, 2002
The May 14 elections represent a tremendous step forward for Sierra Leone. After ten years of devastating civil war, the Sierra Leonean people have made a courageous choice in favor of peace. They should be congratulated for this choice and every effort must be made to ensure that the peace will be a lasting one. Election day itself is only one part of this process. A long road still lies ahead for Sierra Leoneans as they seek to consolidate democratic institutions, reaffirm the rule of law, and build a framework for sustainable development.





United States

1 Mar 2000
Observing the 1999 Cherokee Nation Elections [PDF]
Final report of the Carter Center Cherokee Nation Election Delegations to the May 22, 1999 primary elections and the July 24, 1999 run-off elections.



25 Jul 1999
Postelection Statement on Cherokee Nation Elections, July 25, 1999
The Carter Center accepted the invitation of The Cherokee Nation Election Commission in Oklahoma to observe the Cherokee Nation elections in May 1999, and at the invitation of the Commission agreed to return to observe the July 24 run-off elections for the Principal Chief, Deputy Chief and two of the 15 seats of the tribal council.



1 Jun 1999
Postelection Statement on Cherokee Nation Elections, June 1, 1999
Before going into details, we would once again like to congratulate you on your dedication to well-run tribal elections and to the professionalism and unflappability of your staff.





Venezuela



28 Jun 2005
Report: The Carter Center and the Peacebuilding Process in Venezuela
June 2002 - February 2005 (English and Spanish).



25 Feb 2005
Observacion del Referendo Revocatorio Presidencial en Venezuela: Informe Integral [PDF]
Observacion del Referendo Revocatorio Presidencial en Venezuela: Informe Integral. Serie de Reportajes Especiales (en Espanol).



25 Feb 2005
The Venezuela Presidential Recall Referendum: Final Reports
An overview of the Carter Center’s observation of the 2004 Venezuela presidential recall referendum, with links to three final reports (in English and Spanish).

25 Feb 2005
El Centro Carter y el Proceso de Construccion de Paz en Venezuela, Junio 2002 - Febrero 2005: Resumen [PDF]
El Centro Carter y el Proceso de Construccion de Paz en Venezuela, Junio 2002 - Febrero 2005: Resumen (en Espanol). Serie de Reportajes Especiales, el Centro Carter.



25 Feb 2005
Observing the Venezuela Presidential Recall Referendum: Comprehensive Report [PDF]Comprehensive report of The Carter Center’s observation of the 2004 Venezuela presidential recall referendum.



1 Feb 2005
El Centro Carter y el Proceso de Construccion de Paz en Venezuela, Junio 2002 - Febrero 2005 [PDF]
El Centro Carter y el Proceso de Construccion de Paz en Venezuela, Junio 2002 - Febrero 2005, Resumen (Espanol).



1 Feb 2005
The Carter Center and the Peacebuilding Process in Venezuela, June 2002 - February 2005 [PDF]
The Carter Center and the Peacebuilding Process in Venezuela, June 2002 - February 2005, Summary.



30 Sep 2004
Executive Summary of Comprehensive Report: 2004 Venezuela Elections [PDF]
This is the executive summary of the comprehensive report of the Carter Center’s observation of the signature collection, verification, reparos, and the recall referendum in Venezuela. As the formal appeals and dispute adjudication process is still ongoing, we will issue an addendum to this report if needed at the conclusion of these formal appeals.



30 Sep 2004
Resumen Ejecutivo del Informe Comprehensivo [PDF]
El presente informe es un resumen ejecutivo del informe final detallado sobre la observación del Centro Carter en la recolección de firmas, su verificación, los reparos y el propio revocatorio. Considerando que hay apelaciones formales presentadas y que existe un proceso controversial en marcha, publicaremos un addendum al presente informe si resultare necesario una vez que concluyan las apelaciones formales.



16 Sep 2004
Report on an Analysis of the Representativeness of the Second Audit Sample, and the Correlation between Petition Signers and the Yes Vote in the Aug. 15, 2004, Presidential Recall Referendum [PDF]
This study was conducted by The Carter Center and confirmed by the OAS in response to a written request from Sumate presented to The Carter Center Sept. 7, 2004. Sumate asked that The Carter Center evaluate a study performed by Professors Ricardo Hausmann and Roberto Rigobon.



16 Sep 2004
Informe sobre un análisis de la representatividad del segundo examen de auditoría, y la correlación entre los firmantes de la petición y el voto por el SI en el referendo de
El presente estudio fue llevado a cabo por el Centro Carter y lo confirmó la OEA, en respuesta a un pedido escrito que Sumate presentó al Centro el 7 de septiembre de 2004. Sumate solicitó que el Centro Carter evaluara un estudio efectuado por los profesores Ricardo Hausmann y Roberto Rigobon.



5 Sep 2004
The Carter Center Statement About Statistical Assessment of the Venezuela Referendum Results (English and Spanish)
Upon receiving complains from the opposition Coordinadora Democrática about suspected irregularities in the voting results recorded in the machine, specifically, a pattern of tied results among two or three machines in the same voting tables, The Carter Center consulted with several statisticians.



26 Aug 2004
Audit of the Results of the Presidential Recall Referendum in Venezuela (PDF), Aug. 26, 2004 [PDF]
Final Report: Audit of the Results of the Presidential Recall Referendum in Venezuela, Aug. 26, 2004.



26 Aug 2004
El Informe Final De La Auditoria Del Referendum En Venezuela (PDF), Aug. 26, 2004 [PDF]
Auditoria de Resultados, Proceso de Referendum Revocatorio Presidencial Venezuela (Spanish version).



10 Aug 2004
Carter Center Delegates Arrive in Venezuela Aug. 11 to Observe Presidential Recall Referendum (English and Spanish)
Invited by the National Election Council (CNE) to observe the presidential recall referendum on Aug. 15, the Carter Center delegation of experienced observers from 14 countries arrives Wednesday to complement the core team already in Caracas.



1 Feb 2001
Observando Cambio Politico En Venezuela: La Constitucion Bolivariana Y Las Elecciones 2000, Informe Final [PDF]
El Centro Carter ha estado comprometido con observaciones electorales en Venezuela desde el año1998. Hemos conservado por lo menos un representante en el país durante este período de dos años el cual nos ha mantenido informados en forma regular, hemos enviado diez misiones de estudio y delegaciones interinas para que nos informaran sobre las preparaciones para cada elección así como sobre la solución de disputas que surgían a raíz de cada contienda electoral y hemos observado dos elecciones presidenciales.



1 Feb 2001
Observing Political Change in Venezuela: The Bolivarian Constitution and 2000 Elections, Final Report [PDF]
Venezuela under President Hugo Chávez undertook a bold experiment to revamp its political system and address economic inequities and poverty.



25 May 2000
Pre-Election Statement on Venezuela Elections, May 25, 2000
The Carter Center continues to observe the electoral process, postponed since May 25th. At that time, we applauded the decision to postpone the Mega-elections so that electoral authorities could have the opportunity to better prepare and inform the citizens of Venezuela about their election options and how to vote.



1 Feb 1999
Observation of the 1998 Venezuelan Elections, Final Reort [PDF]
The Carter Center was invited to observe the December 1998 Presidential election. The Special Report gives a detailed summary of the Center’s activities, including the pre-election period, the legislative and regional elections, and the presidential election. The report concludes with post-election observations, recommendations, and suggestions.





Zambia

9 Jan 2003
Observing the 2001 Zambia Elections, Final Report [PDF]
Final report of the Carter Center delegation to the 2001 Zambia elections.



7 Mar 2002
Postelection Statement on Zambia Elections, March 7, 2002 [PDF]
This is the Carter Center’s fourth and final public statement on the Zambian 2001 Tripartite Elections, released 7 March 2002.



31 Jan 2002
Postelection Statement on Zambia Elections, Jan. 31 2002
This statement, released 31 January 2002, is the Carter Center’s third public statement on the Zambian electoral process. The first was a pre-election statement released on December 13, 2001. The second was an interim post-election statement on December 30, 2001.



30 Dec 2001
Postelection Statement on Zambia Elections, Dec. 30, 2001 [PDF]
The Carter Center’s interim statement on the 2001 Zambia elections released 30 December 2001. The Carter Center is pleased to observe Zambia’s first tripartite elections since 1964. This is the Center’s second election observation mission in Zambia, having observed the historic 1991 multi-party election.



13 Dec 2001
Pre-Election Statement on Zambia Elections, Dec. 13, 2001 [PDF]
The 13 December 2001 assessment of the Zambian pre-election period. On 27 December 2001, Zambian voters will go to the polls in the country’s first ever tripartite elections. Voters will be issued with three ballots to elect the president, 150 members of parliament and hundreds of local council representatives. President Chiluba announced the election date on 22 November and candidate nomination for all elections was completed by 2 December, launching the formal campaign period.



 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
I guess Glassy didn’t bother to read Carter’s book, where he plants a HUGE (and disporportionate) amount of blame on all things bad in the middle east right on Israel’s doorstep.

No, there’s no bias. None at all...
Maybe Erb should consider that Carter isn’t "bought" so much as he is being paid handsomely by Israel’s enemies to advocate that which he already believes.
Carter’s not so much been "bought" and he has been "leased long term"

Though the money to bail out the family farm, and then his historically grand blunders in the middle east during his presidency now make a great deal more sense...

Oh, and because it amuses me:
Bangladesh
China
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Dominican Republic
East Timor
Ethiopia
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Indonesia
Israel and The Palestinian Territories
Jamaica
Kenya
Liberia
Mali
Mexico
Mozambique
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Peru
Sierra Leone
United States
Venezuela
Zambia
With the exception of "Israel and The Palestinian Territories" and "Cherokee Nation Elections" in the US (seriously, they needed this to be watched? ffs...) I’d like to ponder out loud how many of those named nations are blissful paradises fit for non-barbarians/communists to live in.

You gonna be moving to Liberia any time soon Glassy?

Didn’t think so. It’s stunning that you listed a huge portion of my list titled "Place that, if I owned them and Hell, I would rent them out and live in hell".
 
Written By: Scott
URL: http://
It’s insultingly obvious that the Carter Center’s agenda is in no way focused on Israel.
That’s not the claim being made.
Carter Center on elections worldwide in the past seven years. China is prominently featured. Is that the first outright lie of Dershowitz’ piece? Could he even be bothered to check his facts?
That’s not the argument that was made.

Could you even be bothered to read what Dershowitz actual wrote?
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Let’s list the claims about the Carter Center:
the Carter Center’s Human Rights program has no activity whatever in Saudi Arabia
Maybe glasnost can quit wasting time chasing strawmen and actually find evidence to show Dershowitz an actual liar?
when reviewing the Center’s human rights activities in other countries: essentially no human rights activities in China or in North Korea, or in Iran, Iraq, the Sudan, or Syria, but activity regarding Israel and its alleged abuses, according to the Center’s website
True or false?
its focus is away from significant Arab abuses and on Israel’s far less serious ones
Does the Center focus on Israel more than Arab nations?

How about it, glasnost? Stick with the actual claims by Dershowitz and show where the Carter Center demonstrates the "lies" of Dershowitz.

Either put up or admit your own libel.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Here we go:

http://www.cartercenter.org/countries/index.html

Can anyone find anything about human rights violations for any Middle Eastern nation or territory? Just one, you say? Hmmm...

How about Sudan? North Korea?

Wait...what did Dershowitz claim again?
when reviewing the Center’s human rights activities in other countries: essentially no human rights activities in China or in North Korea, or in Iran, Iraq, the Sudan, or Syria, but activity regarding Israel and its alleged abuses, according to the Center’s website
Oh, we forgot China! I guess this is why he used "essentially no human rights activities" because the Center wrote a letter in support of a couple of dissidents.

Where is the lie, again?
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://

You see, Erb can believe that everyone else might sacrifice American interests because of "The Lobby,"
Where did I make that claim? I just note the obvious, AIPAC is a very rich, successful lobbying organization. I dealt with them first hand when I worked in DC, and they were good. They didn’t pressure, they didn’t cajole, they would "provide information," and say that they would give us more info if needed. Now, I’m not sure what kind of lobbying they did directly with the Senator, but a lot of the influence they have is because they give aides and staffs a lot of information and explain their position. Contrarily Arab lobbying groups at that time (apparently they’ve improved) were strident and often accusatory. While AIPAC never made really negative statements about their potential foes, the Arab groups I ran across consistently made anti-Israeli statements. That meant that staff took them far less seriously than AIPAC. It’s not bad to say the lobby is very powerful — lobbies aspire to power and efficacy. I don’t know why some people (like Dershowitz, whose attack on them was really stretched and weak) thought that Walt and Mearsheimer had done anything bad in their piece.

Recently Mearsheimer has developed a branch of realism called "Offensive realism" which corresponds in another thread to the idea of war as a tool of diplomacy (rather than Morgenthau’s traditional notion of realism with war as a last resort). Mearsheimer also is a critic of American ties with China, he’s one that sees China as a potential threat to US interests and believes we’re giving them a lot of leverage with our open economic policies. (I see his point, but disagree with his recommendation).
 
Written By: Scott Erb
URL: http://faculty.umf.maine.edu/~erb/blog.htm
Jesus, you guys need to put a hard limit on commenter post lengths.
 
Written By: Mark A. Flacy
URL: http://
I second the motion... All in favor of strapping elctrode to Glassy to prevent such abuses... :)
 
Written By: Scott
URL: http://
I just note the obvious, AIPAC is a very rich, successful lobbying organization.
While the two you bring up claim the group had a "stranglehold" on Congress and drove us to make war on Iraq to the detriment of American interests in order to help Israel.

Whatever. Typical Erb...
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
I think "essentially no" activity on China is pretty much an outright lie, JWG, given the Carter Center’s list of activities relating to China. I haven’t found any other outright lies. I have found an outrageous running list of misleading and insulting insinuations and accusations. If I was Carter, I would sue Dershowitz for slander and defamation.

Shall we recap Dershowitz?

#1. The The Zayed Centre for Coordination and Follow-up seems to have a lot of crazy and anti-semitic stuff associated with it.

This seems to hold up well. Thanks for the links. Yep, Arab world propaganda is pretty wacked-out.

#2.Shiekh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan gives money to this place, and to Jimmy Carter, and Carter won’t give it back..

This may be accurate, but Dershowitz is already deep into the spin zone. For one thing, Shiekh Zayed is the
President of the United Arab Emirates
, one of America’s best buds. Dershowitz’ failure to mention this is a pretty damning slant. So, the UAE is okay to run our port security, but Jimmy Carter has to return money from their president? Consistent standards, please?

#3. I’m sure you’ll try to claim no such thing happens, JWG, but it seems abundantly clear that point #3 by Dershowitz is:
The Carter Center is taking money from Arab countries in order to whitewash the Arab world and plant Anti-Semitic propaganda.

This is horsesh*t of the highest order. And I’ll stand by that. Jimmy Carter, as president, wrote a book about the situation of Palestinians in the West Bank that Dershowitz didn’t like. Fine and dandy. But for Dershowitz to defame the Carter Center on the basis that an Arab Country gave it money, is outrageous. He doesn’t have any actual anti-Semitic statements from the Carter Center that would demonstrate this malicious claim, because there aren’t any.

Jimmy Carter’s presidency is fair game, and mock his opinions anyway you like, but the Carter Center has done outstanding pro-democracy work of total integrity in tens of third-world countries. Dershowitz casually equates it with an anti-Semitic propaganda machine without a hesitant breath. It’s hackery.

and before you say straw man, if that’s not the message Dershowitz is sending, then why exactly did McQ get this message from the article?

Alan Dershowitz claims that the reason Jimmy Carter is so supportive of the Palestinian cause (and seems to be inclined toward anti-semitism) is because he’s been accepting money from pretty disreputable sources:

This is slander, and it makes me angry. Dershowitz is now, globally, on the side of the places like the Zayed Center, because he’s working to undermine an institution - the Carter Center - unswervingly dedicated to the kind of reforms that would make cr*p like the Zayed Center unsupportable.






 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
the Carter Center’s Human Rights program has no activity whatever in Saudi Arabia

See my previous statement: Like every other NGO in the world, the Carter Center can only have programs where nations allow it to have programs. There is no Carter Center Special Forces to run programs in Saudi Arabia.

This may, or may not, be literally true. Also, the US government has no human-rights program in Turkmenistan. What’s the fuc*ing point? Here’s one: it’s lame and ridiculous to criticize an NGO for not having a human-rights program in your pet country when a) such programs can’t be done without the nation’s approval. And b) that NGO has obvious programs in scores of unstable, morally dubious developing nations, all trying to fix something broken and protect people who need it.

when reviewing the Center’s human rights activities in other countries: essentially no human rights activities in China or in North Korea, or in Iran, Iraq, the Sudan, or Syria, but activity regarding Israel and its alleged abuses, according to the Center’s website

Oh, a cherry-picked list of countries for us to choose from that the Carter Center doesn’t have activity in! How nice! No one in Iraq right now, hmm, wonder why? No one in North Korea? Heavens! And I hear the North Koreans are just letting Western NGO’s roam freely! Forget that the prominent speaker in the 2006 Human Rights conference was Egyptian dissident Saad
Ibrahim:

http://www.cartercenter.org/news/documents/doc2345.html

The Carter Center is leftist on Israeli policy in the territories. The same document that Dershowitz probably used for most of his agenda, here - well, let’s look at some quotes:

Because of preoccupation with the war in Iraq
and the issue of terrorism, firmly addressing
human rights violations by governments in the
former Soviet republics and countries with majority
Muslim populations such as Tunisia and
Indonesia, to name a few, is a lower priority for
the United States and other powerful nations.


Wait, that sounds like... saying the U.S. should pay more attention to human rights violations in Arab countries. But wait! How did that get in there!

Ms. Rana Husseini (Jordan) received a Reebok Human
Rights Award in 1998 for her investigation into “honor
killings,” where women are slain by family members as punishment
for perceived immorality. Defying cultural taboos
and threats to her life, she reported that honor killings actually
account for the majority of murders in Jordan every
year. Since writing about honor killings, she has continued to
speak out about violence against women in her nation, receiving
worldwide attention for her efforts.


Wait, a whole speaker on honor killings in Jordan! But... aren’t they totally blowing off Arab world abuses? Didn’t I hear that somewhere?

Hey, here’s a speaker about China! Page 87.

I hope the high commissioner on human
rights and The Carter Center can join hands to
urge the Chinese government to release all the
political dissidents in China, including Falun
Gong disciples who have been persecuted.


Hey, here’s one from DR. SIMA SAMAR (AFGHANISTAN) about Afghanistan! Note that I am excerpting a few lines from within pages reffering to each country.

We need for the size of the international
peace troops to be expanded not by
hundreds or thousands but by tens of
thousands.


Wait, here’s another entire page:

OMAR MESTIRI (TUNISIA)
I am the secretary-general for the National Advisory
for Freedom in Tunisia. It is an unauthorized organization,
whose activities have been subjected to great
persecution. Our goal is to combat impunity, especially
impunity for torture. In our country, the
system has been in violation of the law: Citizens
who exercise their rights are criminalized; those
who attack their freedom are guaranteed impunity.


May I be finally be finished with taking out this outrageous trash? McQ, care to update your posts with the abundant evidence that the Carter Center is far from ignoring Arab human rights abuses? JWG: so, you were totally wrong, huh?



 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
No one in Iraq right now, hmm, wonder why?
Yeah, why?
 
Written By: Mark A. Flacy
URL: http://
This may be accurate, but Dershowitz is already deep into the spin zone. For one thing, Shiekh Zayed is the
President of the United Arab Emirates, one of America’s best buds. Dershowitz’ failure to mention this is a pretty damning slant. So, the UAE is okay to run our port security, but Jimmy Carter has to return money from their president? Consistent standards, please?
We gave stuff to Saddam too.

Doesn’t mean he was a great guy...
This is horsesh*t of the highest order. And I’ll stand by that. Jimmy Carter, as president, wrote a book about the situation of Palestinians in the West Bank that Dershowitz didn’t like. Fine and dandy. But for Dershowitz to defame the Carter Center on the basis that an Arab Country gave it money, is outrageous. He doesn’t have any actual anti-Semitic statements from the Carter Center that would demonstrate this malicious claim, because there aren’t any.
I think that fact that Carter (*spit*) basicly blamed every problem in the middle east on Israel counts as valid reason for disagreement. *I* hate Carter for it, and I’m not jewish...

Think about how the Jews feel. Carter is liek a mini-Hitler in that regard, minus an ability (thank god) to affect foreign relations (he;’s not called the worst foreign policy president for nothing, you know).
Ms. Rana Husseini (Jordan) received a Reebok Human Rights Award in 1998
1998? Boy, they really are on top of things...

There are other huge issues I ahve with Glassy and his idiocy, but I leave them for others...

Suffice to say that the suggestions of a socio-global retard like Carter isn’t what I’d base foreign policy on...

In fact, he’s right there with McNamara... I’ll only do something if they say I shouldn’t...
 
Written By: Scott
URL: http://
I think "essentially no" activity on China is pretty much an outright lie
Again, that NOT what he wrote. Why do you keep missing the "human rights" part?
it’s lame and ridiculous to criticize an NGO for not having a human-rights program in your pet country
...when taking their money at the same time? How blind can you be?
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Shiekh Zayed is the President of the United Arab Emirates
No, he died two years before the port deal.

BTW, he died on our election day in 2004. I guess he couldn’t handle the suspense.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
...when taking their money at the same time? How blind can you be?
It seems that if someone or some government has a bad human rights record, any money that can be taken from them is good, since it’s money that can be used to fight against what it might otherwise be spent upon.

As for Israel, most Jews and Palestinians want peace. Militarists on each side rationalize violence against the other. The destinies of the Israelis and Palestinians are linked, they’ll either find a way to co-exist with two states, or they’ll keep killing each other until some nuclear or biological terror attack destroys both peoples.
 
Written By: Scott Erb
URL: http://faculty.umf.maine.edu/~erb/blog.htm
since it’s money that can be used to fight against what it might otherwise be spent upon
What part of NO human rights activity in the Middle East (besides Israel) is so difficult to understand? The money is NOT fighting against human rights abuses unless it refers to Israel.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
It pains me to say this, but I now believe that there is no person in American public life today who has a lower ratio of real to apparent integrity than Jimmy Carter.

Well, there is a fellow by the name of George W. Bush, who has no integrity whatsoever, but who is still defended by legions of people, including most of the chuckleheads who write for, and comment on, this blog.
 
Written By: Earl Delphi
URL: http://yahoo.com
who is still defended by legions of people, including most of the chuckleheads who write for, and comment on, this blog.
Obviously, someone who is new here.
It seems that if someone or some government has a bad human rights record, any money that can be taken from them is good, since it’s money that can be used to fight against what it might otherwise be spent upon.
Another thought on this...

I guess Erb would defend the mafia giving boatloads of money to local police agencies since that money can be used to fight other crimes instead of being spent by the mafia.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Obviously, someone who is new here.
Perhaps. Certainly, his comments sounded like the standard line with those who really, really hate Bush. If you slam Bush for three things and defend him on one, you’re still in the tank for Bush, as far as they are concerned.

I don’t think any of the front page posters here have a lot to say that’s favorable about Bush. Certainly I don’t. For me, a good short take would be that, as bad as Bush is, the alternatives (Gore and Kerry) would have been a lot worse.
 
Written By: Billy Hollis
URL: http://
"We know nothing about Shiekh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan except that he has an Arabic sounding name."

Well, I know that he has an actual Arabic name.

"...when taking their money at the same time? "

Pure coincidence.
 
Written By: timactual
URL: http://
"...someone as honored, honest and respected as Carter..."
in your opinion, of course.

 
Written By: Aardvark
URL: http://
"...someone as honored, honest and respected as Carter..."

in your opinion, of course.
No, it’s not subjective, it’s objective. No one reading this will ever have the kind of respect and honor that Carter has received for his vast humanitarian efforts, including a Nobel Peace Prize. (Though if we want to talk about his Presidency rather than his post-Presidency, he was mediocore). Now in your opinion that might be unjust, you may not think he deserves the accolades. But they are there and real.
 
Written By: Scott Erb
URL: http://faculty.umf.maine.edu/~erb/blog.htm
Yeah, that would be the same Nobel whose award committee admitted that the reason for the prize was to slam George W. Bush. Yep, real objective. Scott Erb, first water hypocrite.
 
Written By: SDN
URL: http://
"(Though if we want to talk about his Presidency rather than his post-Presidency, he was mediocore)."

Amazing how his knowledge, wisdom, and perspicacity in international affairs zoomed from mediocre to genius after he was tossed out of the White House.
 
Written By: timactual
URL: http://
Though if we want to talk about his Presidency rather than his post-Presidency, he was mediocore
I’m actually afraid to learn what you consider to be BAD, if Carter’s 4 years are merely mediocore...

Habitat for Humanity? That’s something I can get behind (and have, on many occations).

Every other single thing he’s ever done or said? Not hardly...
 
Written By: Scott
URL: http://
Sheikh Zayed (as he’s more commonly referred to in these parts) was Emirati, not Saudi. He was the ruler of Abu Dhabi (one of the United Arab Emirates) and the president of the UAE until his death in 2004. The UAE is a very friendly arab country which consists mainly of gleaming modern cities built on oil wealth and free trade zones set in sandy desert, with some mountains and small green belts (oases). The Emiratis themselves are far, far more tolerant than the Saudis, and western expats (who number in the hundreds of thousands) live pretty much as they would back home.

Judged by his actions, Sheikh Zayed was neither anti-Jew nor a supporter of fundamentalist or fascist Islam. To say so on the basis of the fact that a think tank he funded allowed a few extremists to speak is like saying GWB supports terrorism because some right-winger said something extreme about invading Canada. Maybe the speakers were allowed specifically so the opposite view - or a different view - could be presented. This smear piece by Mr Dershowitz is amazing - I’d be interested to hear the evidence for his assertion that money from the UAE is dirty and anti-semitic ? He uses this term without any kind of attempt to justify it. Then the Sheikh himself is "an irredeemable anti-semite and all-round bigot" !? Was he ? Based on what ?
 
Written By: Blewyn
URL: http://blewog.blogspot.com
The UAE does not recognize Israel. Sheikh Zayed was their leader for 30 years. I guess he was just busy and never got around to it. Maybe it was on his "To Do’ list right after funding the Carter Center to only look at human rights violations in one place within the Middle East.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
The UAE does not recognize Israel. Sheikh Zayed was their leader for 30 years.
A lot of states we do business with don’t recognize Israel.
 
Written By: Scott Erb
URL: http://faculty.umf.maine.edu/~erb/blog.htm
Carter’s presidency was a disaster. We still haven’t recovered from the Iranian fiasco.

He makes Chamberlain look good.
 
Written By: MarkD
URL: http://
A lot of states we do business with don’t recognize Israel.
And they’re giving money to the Carter Center to support his verbal attacks on Israel while not being challenged on their own human rights violations. That’s the point.

Can you not follow your own logic? Oh, wait...that problem has been addressed many times.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Yeah, that would be the same Nobel whose award committee admitted that the reason for the prize was to slam George W. Bush. Yep, real objective. Scott Erb, first water hypocrite.
Yeah, these days the Nobel Peace prize is basically crap. Carter and Arafat: what a joke.
 
Written By: Don
URL: http://
This may be accurate, but Dershowitz is already deep into the spin zone. For one thing, Shiekh Zayed is the
President of the United Arab Emirates, one of America’s best buds. Dershowitz’ failure to mention this is a pretty damning slant. So, the UAE is okay to run our port security, but Jimmy Carter has to return money from their president? Consistent standards, please?
The UAE wasn’t OK to run our port security—that deal fell through.
 
Written By: Don
URL: http://
And they’re giving money to the Carter Center to support his verbal attacks on Israel while not being challenged on their own human rights violations. That’s the point.


You see those four paragraphed excerpts in italics up there in my last comment? Those are quotes from speakers at the last Carter Center conference challenging Arab governments on human rights violations. So at this point, you’re not misinformed anymore. You’re lying.

Do a little genuine research on the Carter Center’s work before you make sh*t up about what positions you think they have and what work Alan Dershowitz blithely assumes they aren’t doing.
 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
You see those four paragraphed excerpts in italics up there in my last comment? Those are quotes from speakers at the last Carter Center conference challenging Arab governments on human rights violations. So at this point, you’re not misinformed anymore. You’re lying.

Do a little genuine research on the Carter Center’s work before you make sh*t up about what positions you think they have and what work Alan Dershowitz blithely assumes they aren’t doing.
I guess those Arab governments need to pay off the Carter Center, just like the UAE.
 
Written By: Don
URL: http://
The Carter Center does a ton of fantastic work, most recently in the Venezuelan elections
ahem, difficult to read after this. i’m sure real objective work was done here. obvious threats to opposition notwithstanding...
No one reading this will ever have the kind of respect and honor that Carter has received for his vast humanitarian efforts
if by "vast" you actually mean "selective"...
 
Written By: Rob
URL: http://
You’re lying. Do a little genuine research on the Carter Center’s work before you make sh*t up
Noooooo...

I have read all of what Egyptian Saad Ibrahim said at the conference. Did you? Or did you just bother to see his name? He comments briefly about how he was unjustly prisoned and ultimately exonerated by the Egyptian high court. He also manages to blame the Patriot Act and to throw in several jabs against Israel. In fact, he spends most of his time criticizing American policy.

And Rana Husseini from Jordan gets a mention at the conference asking:
My request is for The Carter Center and U.N. officials to help us with our work to continue promoting women’s rights — with my cause, of course, to address the issue of women who are killed in the name of family honor.
I have been unable to find anything about the Carter Center and honor killings within the Middle East anywhere else in their website.

Wow. Two whole people speak briefly about limited human rights violations in the Middle East over a span of how many years? And one of them spends more time attacking the US and Israel than he does Egypt.

Furthermore, I don’t recall donations from Egypt or Jordan being mentioned among the Carter Center money, though I may be mistaken.

You have managed to provide additional evidence that the Carter Center effectively ignores the vast abuses of human rights throughout Arab nations while taking every opportunity to criticize Israel.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://
Your (and Dershowitz’s) words are like magic here.

You can’t use "ignore", because that would be a lie.

But you think you can use "effectively ignores",

by which you really mean, "doesn’t pay as much attention on this particular area as I think they should be, relative to their total efforts".

What laughable sophistry and dishonesty.

So they made the mortal sin of criticizing Israeli policy - not while ignoring Arab human rights violations, but while not putting in as much attention as you think they ought to - (not even considering the point, which still stands, that the Center can only run programs on countries that let them run programs, which is why you only see moderate Arab countries on the list, and not the hard core -

go start your own pro-democracy center. See how much better you do. Good luck.




 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://
You have done nothing but support Dershowitz’s statements:
The Carter Center’s mission statement claims that "The Center is nonpartisan and acts as a neutral party in dispute resolution activities." How can that be, given that its coffers are full of Arab money, and that its focus is away from significant Arab abuses and on Israel’s far less serious ones?
Your own research has shown that the Carter Center does no human rights work in the Middle East except for in the Palestinian territories.

Your own research has shown that the Carter Center hardly makes a peep concerning Arab abuses in the Middle East, while making considerable criticisms against Israel.

Coincidentally (*nudge-nudge-wink-wink*), the Carter Center receives millions from Arab sources.
the Center can only run programs on countries that let them run programs, which is why you only see moderate Arab countries on the list, and not the hard core
But they have no problem taking money from the "hard core."

BTW, they aren’t running human rights programs in the "moderate Arab countries" either. They have mearly asked 2 Arab speakers over the years to speak at a conference and have one of them slam America and Israel for their abuse of muslims.
while not putting in as much attention as you think they ought to
Yes, that’s the criticism based on their OWN claims of being nonpartisan and neutral.

It’s hard to be taken seriously as nonpartisan and neutral when you take boatloads of money from one group and subsequently spend copious amounts of energy attacking that group’s enemy.

Thank you again for demonstrating that point.
 
Written By: JWG
URL: http://

 
Add Your Comment
  NOTICE: While we don't wish to censor your thoughts, we do blacklist certain terms of profanity or obscenity. This is not to muzzle you, but to ensure that the blog remains work-safe for our readers. If you wish to use profanity, simply insert asterisks (*) where the vowels usually go. Your meaning will still be clear, but our readers will be able to view the blog without worrying that content monitoring will get them in trouble when reading it.
Comments for this entry are closed.
Name:
Email:
URL:
HTML Tools:
Bold Italic Blockquote Hyperlink
Comment:
   
 
Vicious Capitalism

Divider

Buy Dale's Book!
Slackernomics by Dale Franks

Divider

Divider