Meta-Blog

SEARCH QandO

Email:
Jon Henke
Bruce "McQ" McQuain
Dale Franks
Bryan Pick
Billy Hollis
Lance Paddock
MichaelW

BLOGROLL QandO

 
 
Recent Posts
The Ayers Resurrection Tour
Special Friends Get Special Breaks
One Hour
The Hope and Change Express - stalled in the slow lane
Michael Steele New RNC Chairman
Things that make you go "hmmmm"...
Oh yeah, that "rule of law" thing ...
Putting Dollar Signs in Front Of The AGW Hoax
Moving toward a 60 vote majority?
Do As I Say ....
 
 
QandO Newsroom

Newsroom Home Page

US News

US National News
Politics
Business
Science
Technology
Health
Entertainment
Sports
Opinion/Editorial

International News

Top World New
Iraq News
Mideast Conflict

Blogging

Blogpulse Daily Highlights
Daypop Top 40 Links

Regional

Regional News

Publications

News Publications

 
Iraqi Oil Revenue Sharing Law goes to Parliament
Posted by: McQ on Wednesday, May 02, 2007

This is big news as well as good news from Iraq:
The Iraqi government has sent a draft oil law to parliament, a major step towards meeting one of the political benchmarks Washington has set for Baghdad.

The announcement by Oil Minister Hussain al-Shahristani on Wednesday came on the eve of a major conference in Egypt where industrialized powers and Iraq's neighbors will discuss how to stabilize Iraq and seek reforms in return for reconstruction.

The draft is crucial to regulating how wealth from Iraq's oil reserves would be shared by its sectarian and ethnic groups.

It was passed by cabinet in February and hailed at the time by Shi'ite Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki as a pillar of Iraqi unity. But a dispute between the central government and autonomous, oil-rich Kurdistan over control of the world's third largest oil reserves has delayed its submission.
Since it has now been submitted, one has to assume that dispute has been settled.
"It has been sent to parliament now. There has been agreement among the political parties to work together to enact it by the end of the month," Shahristani said.

"The KRG (Kurdish Regional Government) is not opposed to the draft law ... they are very happy with the draft law."
This time frame is in keeping with the one I got in answer to a question I put to Dr. Ali Aldabbagh, spokesman for the al Maliki government, on an April 10th conference call:
He felt pretty confident in saying he thought the final legislation would be finished and signed into law within the next two months. That's a very big step. I followed up by asking if he thought that finally passing that legislation would provide the good faith gesture from the government which would dampen some of the Sunni resistance.

He answered that yes, he thought it would be a good step to ensuring Sunnis they were included in the government and, as he said, "wouldn't be left out in the desert with nothing". I agree that this is a very important step toward reconciliation and the sooner the better.
That last paragraph is the hoped for result of passing this legislation. Like I said, this is a big step forward. The next benchmarks to look for are "rolling back a ban on former members of Saddam Hussein's party holding office, reforming the constitution and calling provincial polls."

All of these steps should help alleviate the Sunni portion of the population's concerns about the central government and help ease the violence by drawing Sunni support from the insurgency.
 
TrackBacks
Return to Main Blog Page
 
 

Previous Comments to this Post 

Comments
This is socialism. Why is it good for the future of Iraq?
 
Written By: Luke
URL: http://
So, does the state of Alaska practices socialism then...
 
Written By: Keith_Indy
URL: http://asecondhandconjecture.com/
I don’t believe this is the state owning it, but the people themselves.
 
Written By: ChrisB
URL: http://
Well when I be getting MY cut of the Iraqi Oil?

Yes it would be BEST if the oil company’s stock were simply distributed amongst the populace, that way the People WOULD own the oil company, but this isn’t bad.
 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://
McQ: perhaps I’m just a tad pessimistic and cynical, but I am having difficulty trying to imagine an insurgent getting ready to trigger an IED or drive his carbomb into a marketplace having his ear to the cellphone, anxiously waiting for news of this deal so he can call off the attack and go home to live in peace with his neighbors. My sense is that the Sunni troublemakers aren’t those concerned they’d "...be left out in the desert with nothing", but rather those who aren’t interested in sharing, period, with the Shiites, and with the same holding for the Shiites doing the fighting, that they’re not interested in giving up much, if anything, to the Sunnis. Accordingly, I’m not going to bed tonight thinking much is going to be different when I wake up tomorrow... or the day(s) after that... If however, this is truly good news, then we ought to wake up tomorrow to the sound of Americans not dying...
 
Written By: steve
URL: http://
McQ: perhaps I’m just a tad pessimistic and cynical, but I am having difficulty trying to imagine an insurgent getting ready to trigger an IED or drive his carbomb into a marketplace having his ear to the cellphone, anxiously waiting for news of this deal so he can call off the attack and go home to live in peace with his neighbors.
That’s because you’re too deep in the weeds with your analysis. Iraq, like most Arab countries, is a country of tribes, and it is tribal leaders who call the shots. That’s who will decide whether or not this is the tonic necessary to end the insurgency. And if they do, as we’ve seen in Anbar, the rest will follow.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/blog
Since it has now been submitted, one has to assume that dispute has been settled.
..........big big stretch

All of these steps should help alleviate the Sunni portion of the population’s concerns about the central government and help ease the violence by drawing Sunni support from the insurgency.
When it actually happens, let’s talk........
 
Written By: darohu
URL: http://
So, let’s talk...
As the security situation in Iraq is expected to be challenging, there are signs of progress made in Fardh Al-Qanoon.

According to Fox, some of the signs of progress included a significant reduction in sectarian murders, increases in the number of weapon stockpiles seized and actionable tips provided by local citizens.

“Improving security can only be achieved by building a loyal, capable and professional Iraqi security force in and around Baghdad,” said Fox. “Only then can the Iraqi people achieve lasting solutions to Iraq’s problems.”

As security improves, Iraqi government officials are expected to take advantage of the opportunity to make progress in economic development.

“We’re putting the Iraqis to work by procuring construction supplies, services and other commodities from local Iraqi contractors,” said Scott. “This helps strengthen the Iraqi economy, enhances the security environment, gives local workers a vested stake in the quality of finish products in their communities and increases local sources for future use.”
****
In an effort to end tribal conflicts that have been occurring for decades, the paramount sheiks from the Karki and Shimouri tribes signed a peace agreement at the home of the Mujema tribal leader in Diyala province, Monday.

Sheik Thaer Ghadban Ibrahim, Karki paramount sheik, and Sheik Ahmad Abdullah Hassooni, Shimouri paramount sheik, have been meeting for the past three months to work out grievances between tribes.

By signing the agreement, the tribes promised to “consolidate and unify to battle all insurgents that penetrate among [their] tribes.”
 
Written By: Keith_Indy
URL: http://asecondhandconjecture.com/
ya let’s talk

The paper work ain’t getting it done.
If this story was simply a sad exception there might be some credibility to the news you site.... instead your example is just another empty promise. You know this begs retaliation and as surely as the sun will rise tomorrow the Yezidi will retaliate. On and on in perpetual escalation.
In the trenches the unwritten law trumps the written every time.
Perhaps this is not the best example of the government versus the insurgents, but damn it, this is reality in Iraq.......... and we don’t have anywhere near enough bombs to change that.

 
Written By: darohu
URL: http://
Wait to see if a) it passes said parliament b) if the government formally disintegrates after said passing c) if the government informally disintegrates after said passing - before drawing conclusions.

 
Written By: glasnost
URL: http://

 
Add Your Comment
  NOTICE: While we don't wish to censor your thoughts, we do blacklist certain terms of profanity or obscenity. This is not to muzzle you, but to ensure that the blog remains work-safe for our readers. If you wish to use profanity, simply insert asterisks (*) where the vowels usually go. Your meaning will still be clear, but our readers will be able to view the blog without worrying that content monitoring will get them in trouble when reading it.
Comments for this entry are closed.
Name:
Email:
URL:
HTML Tools:
Bold Italic Blockquote Hyperlink
Comment:
   
 
Vicious Capitalism

Divider

Buy Dale's Book!
Slackernomics by Dale Franks

Divider

Divider