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June 6th will always be "D-Day"
Posted by: Dale Franks on Wednesday, June 06, 2007

It actually started on June 5th. And it almost didn't start then. The weather had turned bad. A great storm had blown in from the Atlantic. High wind and high seas had forced ships of all kinds back into bays and inlets. Low clouds made it impossible for aircraft to find landmarks. If the weather didn't break, nothing would happen until at least July.

But the weather did break, and so, it began only a day later than planned.
There must have been about, oh, I don't know, 15 of us there. Our two great men were there, Monty and Eisenhower. The poor weatherman had to talk first. Eisenhower asked Monty what he felt. ''Sure, I'll do whatever you say, you know. We're ready.'' Then Eisenhower very calmly said, ''We'll go.''
150,000 soldiers—American, British, Canadian, French, and many others—embarked on 5,000 ships, began moving towards places known today as St. Lô, Vierville-sur-Mer, Pouppeville, Arromanches, La Rivière-Saint-Sauveur, Pointe-du-hoc, Ouistreham.

The men on those ships, for the most part, didn't know those names. They had simpler terms for the beaches where they would be spending the day—and for many, the rest of their lives. They called them Juno, Sword, Gold, Omaha, and Utah.

There were soldiers from many nations involved that day, all of whom deserve to be recognized and remembered. But as an American, it is the men from my country that I will write about.

Only about 15% of them had ever seen combat. But by this time, cold, wet, seasick, crammed into airless holds, or huddled on unprotected decks, many of them preferred combat to what they were going through on board ship.
Get us off these ships. I don't care what's waiting for us.
As it happened, though, it didn't begin on the beaches, but in the air. On the night of June 5th, an armada of over 800 C-47 transport planes ferried the US 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions over the invasion fleet towards France. For them, the weather was still pretty bad. And it was dark.

It was going to be difficult. Everything depended on landing the pathfinders in the right place. Then the pathfinders had to light the dim beacons for the landing zones. The pilots carrying the airborne forces had to see the beacons, then they had to fly precisely, right over the landing zones.

And the Germans. Always the Germans, with searchlights and flares and the 88mm anti-aircraft cannon—the "flak" guns.

Getting everyone down alive, together, and ready to fight was going to be a chancy business. And the airborne troops knew it.
I lined up all the pilots. I says, ''I don't give a damn what you do, but for one thing. If you're going to drop us on a hill or if you're going to drop us on our zone, drop us all in one place.''
But...they didn't. The airborne forces were scattered. Almost no one landed on their programmed landing zone. Units from the two airborne divisions were scattered and intermixed, forcing officers and NCOs to create scratch units on the spot, with whomever they could find. The 101st Airborne Division commander, Maj. Gen. Maxwell Taylor, found that his new "unit" consisted of himself, his deputy commander, a colonel, several captains, majors, and lieutenant colonels...and three enlisted men. He quipped, "Never have so few been commanded by so many."

And still they fought. Gen. Taylor soon had gathered a force of 90 officers, clerks, MPs, and a smattering of infantrymen. With them, he liberated the town of Pouppeville. Elsewhere, American soldiers gathered into groups, and struck out for an objective. Even if it wasn't their objective, it was someone's, and they were going to take and hold it.

And when they took it from the Germans, the Germans tried to take it back. But the paratroopers held.
It was a terrible day for paratroopers, but they did terrible fighting in there and they really made their presence known.
By this time, the Germans knew something was going on, if not precisely what. Their responses were confused. Their commander, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel had returned to Germany for a brief leave. He wasn't the only one absent that night. The 21st Panzer Division's commander, Lt. Gen. Edgar Feuchtinger, was spending the night in Paris with his mistress. Col. Gen. Freiderich Dollman, commander of the 7th Army, and many of his staff officers and commanders, were 90 miles away in Rennes, on a map exercise. Ironically, the scenario for that exercise was countering an airborne landing.

The Germans were surprised, yet subordinate commanders began to take the initiative, seeking out the paratroops and engaging them, trying to determine what was happening. Was it the invasion? A diversion from the expected landings in Calais? What was happening?

Then, as the black night gave way to the cold, gray dawn of June 6th, they began to find out. Looming out of the fog, a vast armada of haze gray ships and landing craft began to move ashore.

At 5:50am, the warships began shelling Utah and Omaha Beaches. In the exchange of fire with German artillery on Utah Beach, one of the landing control ships was sunk. As a result, when the first wave came ashore on Utah beach at 6:30am, they were 2,000 yards south of their designated landing point.

It was a blessing in disguise. There was almost no enemy opposition. Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt Jr. made a personal reconnaissance past Utah beach, and found the beach exits almost undefended. He returned to the beach to coordinate the push inland. By the end of the day, 197 Americans were dead around Utah Beach, but the landing force had pushed inland.

At Omaha Beach, the story was much bleaker.

At around 6:30am, 96 tanks, an Army-Navy special Engineer Task Force, and eight companies of assault infantry went ashore, right into the teeth of withering machine-gun fire. Despite heavy bombardment, the German defenses were intact. Because the landing was at low tide, the men had to cross 185 yards of flat, open beach, as the well-protected German gunners cut them down. Tanks were sunk in their landing ships, or blown up at the edge of the water.
Them poor guys, they died like sardines in a can, they did. They never had a chance.
The men from the 29th Division's 116 Regimental Combat Team (RCT) and the 1st Division's 16th RCT were pushed off course in their landing craft by strong currents, and landed with machine gun bullets spanging off the gunwhales of their LCT's. When the bow ramp dropped, men were riddled with bullets before they could even move. Others, jumping off the sides of the ramp, burdened with their equipment, drowned as they landed in water over their heads. Many more died on the beach, at the water's edge.
You couldn't lay your hand down without you didn't touch a body. You had to weave your way over top of the corpses.
The first instinct for many was to crouch behind the steel anti-tank obstacles, to take cover behind the bodies of fallen comrades, to try and scrape shallow trenches with their hands. And yet, they couldn't. More assault waves were on the way, and the volume of fire was so great that to stay where they were meant certain death. The beach had to be cleared for the incoming waves of infantry, but to move across that open beach also seemed like a death sentence.
He started yelling, ''God damn it, get up. Move in. You're going to die, anyway. Move in and die.''
And so they did. They crossed that empty expanse of beach to the only cover to be had, a narrow strip of rock shingle at the base of the cliffs, below a short, timber seawall.

Those who made it to the shingle in those first hours...just stopped. Behind them was a carpet of bodes, and a tide that ran red with blood, making the spray from the curling waves a sickly pink. Ahead of them were intact and well-armed German defenders. Those men cowering on the shingle behind the low seawall had seen their units decimated, watched successive waves being slaughtered as they hit the beach. Shocked and disorganized, they stayed beneath the seawall, in the only narrow strip of safety they could find.

Meanwhile, at Point-du-hoc, at 7:00am, the men of the 2nd Ranger battalion came ashore beneath the cliffs. Their mission was to climb the steep cliffs with grappling hooks and ropes, to capture the German heavy artillery threatening the Omaha and Utah landings.

Under heavy fire from the cliffs, they fired back with the small mortars that launched the grappling hooks. With their fellow rangers dying on the beach beside them, they grasped the ropes and climbed. They climbed until German riflemen picked them off. They climbed while they watched their buddies arch in pain, and then fall headlong to the rocky beach below. They climbed as the men above them plummeted into them while falling, threatening to tear their fragile grip from the rope. They climbed and climbed.

And when they got to the top, the Germans were ready for them. But the Rangers were ready, too. So they fought their way through the pillboxes and trenches surrounding the gun emplacements. Pushing through the Germans, killing them to capture the guns.

And when they did, they discovered that the guns weren't there. The men of the 2nd Ranger battalion had captured empty concrete emplacements, at the cost of half their number.

Back on Omaha Beach, the carnage continued.
Confusion, total confusion. We were just being slaughtered.
And as for the men (Huh. "Men." Most of them hadn't yet seen their twentieth summer.) who had survived the holocaust on the beach, and who now hid behind the tiny cover of the shingle? Well, who could have blamed them if they had just quit? Decided that this one taste of violence and death was enough for a lifetime? Decided that they didn't want to face what must have seemed like inevitable and horrible, painful death?

And yet...they didn't. Somehow, they gathered whatever courage was left to them, and began to try and figure out how to get off that beach, and move inland.
We were recreating from this mass of twisted bodies a fighting unit again, and it was done by soldiers, not by the officers.
It was C Company of the 116th RCT, accompanied by men from the 5th Ranger Battalion, that began the push. At the top of the seawall was a narrow road, and on the other side of it, protecting a draw, was a mesh of barbed wire. Pvt. Ingram E. Lambert jumped over the wall, crossed the road, and set a Bangalore torpedo in the barbed wire obstacle. He pulled the igniter, but nothing happened. Caught in the open, Pvt. Lambert was cut down by machine gun fire.

His platoon leader, 2d Lt. Stanley M. Schwartz, crossed the road, fixed the igniter, and blew the torpedo. The men of C Company and 5th Rangers began crossing through the gap, some falling to enemy fire. As they left the beach, and assaulted through the draw, others followed. Those men shivering behind the seawall grabbed their rifles, stood up, and began leaving the beach, moving toward the Germans.

Other breaches in the German defenses followed. Company I of the 116th RCT breached the strongpoints defending les Moulins draw. The 1st Section of Company E, 16th RCT, who had come ashore in the first wave, along with elements of two other companies, blew their own gap in the wire, and moved inland. Company G, 16th RCT, needed four Bangalore torpedoes to cut a single lane in the wire and anti-personnel mines that were set up with trip wires.

The breaches were narrow, and tenuous. Follow-on waves still faced murderous fire from the bluffs overlooking the beaches, and there was still confusion as the timetable was set back by the initial fury of German defenses. The 18th RCT was originally scheduled to land at 10:30am, but didn't get on the beach until 1:00pm. The 118th RCT was delayed even more.

By the end of the day 3393 Americans were dead or missing, 3184 wounded, and 26 captured. But the breaches in the German defenses had been made. The Americans were ashore, and they were moving inland. The "Atlantic Wall" had been broken, but at a heavy cost.
When I was relieved and I walked by, oh God, the guys that died that day — all those beautiful, wonderful friends of mine, the day before, the night before, kidding and joking.
Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt was the German Army's Commander in Chief, West. He was a crusty old soldier who disdained the flashy accouterments of rank that a German field marshal usually wore. He was content to attach his batons to the shoulders of his old regimental colonel's uniform. He was also a realist.

Knowing what D-Day meant, he called the Chief of Operations for the German Armed forces, Col. Gen. Alfred Jodl. "What do you suggest we do now, Herr Feldmarschall?" Jodl asked.

"End the war, you fools! What else can you do?" replied the old warrior.
____________________
All quotes taken from the PBS documentary, D-Day
 
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Comments
Personally all this hype and spin is just that, lipstick on a pig:
1) We had no business involving ourselves in this European war. I would remind people that Washington warned against this sort of entanglement. And that this war had nothing to do with the defense of the United States; and
2) Was brought about by our equally fruitless intervention in European affairs in 1917; and
3) Resulted in the curtailment of civil liberties and the unwarented expansion of the Federal Government; and
4) Was so incompetently waged, that only heroic efforts by the apologists of the Roosevelt regime can make it look good;
a) the loss of innocent civilian French life was unconscionable;
b) the Army completely underestimated the combat power of the Wehrmacht in the bocage country, resulting in tens of thousands of NEEDLESS US casualties (in a pointless war for no discernible US interest)
c) Resulted in the quagmire that was the bocage fighting, that in turn, necessitated the illegal terror bombing and attendent loss of civilian lives and property, of St. Lo.

I simply can not conceive why this war is any way celebrated. The problem was not ours to begin with, or rather it was made our problem by interference in German and European affairs for the previous 2 decades and did nothing to advance US interests, but did manage to curtail US liberties and result int he loss of several hundred thousand US lives. All in the name of Roosevelt’s dream of a better post-war world, a world better created by adherence to the Gold Standard and Free Trade. Had force been deemed necessary I think mercenaries, rewards and Lettres of marque would have served the US better, than the death of hundreds of thousands of Conscripts(Slaves).
 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://
Joe, what planet do you live on?
 
Written By: Abdul Hassan
URL: http://
How so Abdul? I’m only saying what any good Progressive/Libertarian/Paleo-Con candidate says today, just in context of the "Good War." Why is it jarring?

 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://
Trackback and comparison to our current struggle in Iraq

As for Joe’s "The problem was not ours to begin with", it would have beomce our problem eventually even if you don’t care about genocide and millions being killed.
 
Written By: abwtf
URL: http://abw.mee.nu
Where is it our job to prevent genocide or to change governments, FREELY elected abtwf? The war was brought on by previous administration’s meddling in Europe and the provactive actions of Roosevelt. The US faced NO existential threat from either Japan OR Germany, yet the US antagonized both! The result was a war that was for Poland and China and the British Empire, and I can’t find the need to defend any of those entities in the US Constitution...I’m sorry for the Jews, but how is their plight our concern?
 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://
Joe;
Good sarcasm. You forgot to mention that in 1940 and 41 the vast majority of Americans opposed not only entering the war, but Roosevelt’s support to the British and Russians which led to the Axis viewing Pearl Harbor as a legitimate target (to say nothing of the intel failures or dilberate inaction by FDR to prevent that attack).
The enemies actually responsible for attacking US soil became a secondary target, instead we focused primarily on a nation that opposed the plan to attack us.
After the war, in our attempts at nation building it took five years before the first West German government was formed, and our occupation and domination contiues sixty years after the end of major combat. A similar hubris was displayed in Japan.
 
Written By: Ted
URL: http://
Good points Ted.....
 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://
That’s some of your best work Joe.

Of course, the best work in that vein is subject to being misinterpreted, as the editors of The Onion know all too well.
 
Written By: Billy Hollis
URL: http://
Joe sounds alarmingly like those arguing against our actions in Iraq. His point is taken.

Indeed, I wonder; What would those who fought that battle, say about America’s unwillingness to deal with Islamic Extremism, opting instead to ’protect the troops’.
 
Written By: Bithead
URL: http://bitsblog.florack.us
Wow. Excellent, Joe. How long did it take you to write that?
 
Written By: timactual
URL: http://
Tim, it took about 10 mintues all tolled, I ought to ahve spell-checked it better, though.
 
Written By: Joe
URL: http://

 
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