Meta-Blog

SEARCH QandO

Email:
Jon Henke
Bruce "McQ" McQuain
Dale Franks
Bryan Pick
Billy Hollis
Lance Paddock
MichaelW

BLOGROLL QandO

 
 
Recent Posts
The Ayers Resurrection Tour
Special Friends Get Special Breaks
One Hour
The Hope and Change Express - stalled in the slow lane
Michael Steele New RNC Chairman
Things that make you go "hmmmm"...
Oh yeah, that "rule of law" thing ...
Putting Dollar Signs in Front Of The AGW Hoax
Moving toward a 60 vote majority?
Do As I Say ....
 
 
QandO Newsroom

Newsroom Home Page

US News

US National News
Politics
Business
Science
Technology
Health
Entertainment
Sports
Opinion/Editorial

International News

Top World New
Iraq News
Mideast Conflict

Blogging

Blogpulse Daily Highlights
Daypop Top 40 Links

Regional

Regional News

Publications

News Publications

 
Immigration reform: the bottom line (update)
Posted by: McQ on Friday, June 29, 2007

Well you've heard all the opinions and excuses as to why the immigration bill didn't make it through the Senate. There are some pretty entertaining and interesting ones out there. The nativist one. The revenge of the bigots. The xenophobia gambit, etc.

But frankly, I think Sen. John Kyl (R-AZ), one of the sponsors of the bill, nails it in one sentence:

"The American people don't have faith in their government's ability to win a war, enforce border security or even process passport requests."

There it is in the proverbial nutshell. And, as he indicates, that includes issues other than immigration. However, in matters of immigration, the government has been its own worst enemy, consistently promising enforcement and never delivering.

And make no mistake, immigration and its control is a federal responsibility. But as many have pointed out, the laws they were proposing, in this now dead legislation, are, for the most part, already on the books. Yet as is evident to everyone, this, and past administrations, have made no effort whatsoever to enforce them. Other than a few recent show raids made in attempt to sway public opinion, immigration enforcement has been virtually non-existent.

Whether you agree with it or not, the border fence in the south is probably most visibly emblematic of the failure of government do what it says it will do. Over 700 miles of fence were authorized and funded last year. 2 miles have been partially built.

Why in the world should the public believe that this new bill (which, btw, cut the amount of fencing almost in half) would magically imbue the fed with the will and means to enforce the laws contained within, when the same laws as they exist today, never were enforced? Why would anyone believe that the Department of Homeland Security, now charged with enforcing the laws as they exist but not doing so, would suddenly be eager to comply? And why would you leave certification of such "trigger events" to the same department which has been so miserable in its failure to enforce existing law?

Obviously most of the American public doesn't believe any of it, and for good and very concrete reasons. But when faced with this lack of faith in government to do what it says it will do, what is the reaction of many of our politicians? To insult the public calling it nativist, biggoted, xenophobic and anti-immigration. To try to shame it into support, instead of trying to understand why the support wasn't there.

In reality the American public isn't any of the insults hurled at it by its representatives. It has become anti-government, especially anti-lying-government. As I see it the public is sick and tired of promises that lead to nowhere and objections which are waved away by arrogant politicians who claim to know better what is "good" for us.

So it's time to wake up in Congress and reconnect with reality. As Scott Rasumussen points out in his poll:
Near the end of the debate, supporters of the doomed legislation often stated that the status quo is unacceptable. Most Americans would agree on that point. In fact, they might even hold that feeling more strongly than the Grand Bargainers of the Senate—72% of American voters believe it’s Very Important to reduce illegal immigration and enforce the borders. But controlling the border was never a focal point of the Senate debate. Instead, the Senators spent most of the time debating the fine points of various approaches to legalizing those who are here illegally. For voters, those topics were definitely a second-or-third tier aspect of the issue.
That defines "out of touch". That demonstrates how poorly those in the Senate understood the priorities of their constituents as they attempted to ram the legislation through.

The solution, of course, is clear and has been clear to all but the Congress and administration. The government needs to regain its credibility with the people. Deal with border security and enforce the existing laws first. 6 years after 9/11, it still has no better handle on who is in this country than they did on 9/10. That's criminal.

Until credibility is restored, Congress and the administration can expect the very same reaction every time they attempt their bassackwards approach to this issue.

UPDATE: Meanwhile, still firmly ensconced in the "out of touch" bubble, Nancy Pelosi issues a statement:
Today, Republicans in the Senate had an historic chance to act in the interests of the American people, but chose not to. Although the immigration bill before the Senate was far from perfect, it would have served as a starting point to address this critical issue for our nation.

During the entire process, newly elected Democratic majorities in both the House and the Senate have been committed to fixing a problem that past Republican Congresses have ignored for years. The President had an obligation to the American people to persuade his fellow Republicans to pass a bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform bill. Unfortunately, he was unable to do so.

Instead, Republicans in the Senate blocked a bill that attempted to fix our nation's dysfunctional immigration system. In doing so, they have failed the American people.
Well not according to the American people if you believe the polls. But hey, like I said, politicians are going to attempt to spin this to their advantage whatever it takes. In this case, it's pretty pathetic.
 
TrackBacks
Return to Main Blog Page
 
 

Previous Comments to this Post 

Comments
I’m going to preempt the predictable bleat of "Without this deal, now we have no chance for anything."

That’s nothing less than extortion on the part of Congress; it is saying that unless we allow them to change the deal, they won’t keep any of it.

It is shameful. It is legislative terrorism. And it should not be appeased.
 
Written By: The Gonzman
URL: http://
Obviously most of the American public doesn’t believe any of it, and for good and very concrete reasons. But when faced with this lack of faith in government to do what it says it will do, what is the reaction of many of our politicians? To insult the public calling it nativist, biggoted, xenophobic and anti-immigration. To try to shame it into support, instead of trying to understand why the support wasn’t there.
Not to mention the audacity to infer that Americans are a bunch of mindless sheep marching to the beat of the talk radio hosts. But hey, they’re going to correct that- The fairness doctrine will ensure that Americans get a healthy dose of unbiased analysis. The likes of Keith Olbermann will be administering it.
So it’s time to wake up in Congress and reconnect with reality.
Or, if your George Voinovich, just retire already.

 
Written By: Dubya
URL: http://
Today, Republicans in the Senate had an historic chance to act in the interests of the American people, but chose not to. Although the immigration bill before the Senate was far from perfect, it would have served as a starting point to address this critical issue for our nation.

During the entire process, newly elected Democratic majorities in both the House and the Senate have been committed to fixing a problem that past Republican Congresses have ignored for years. The President had an obligation to the American people to persuade his fellow Republicans to pass a bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform bill. Unfortunately, he was unable to do so.

Instead, Republicans in the Senate blocked a bill that attempted to fix our nation’s dysfunctional immigration system. In doing so, they have failed the American people.
This is a campaign ad for the GOP....seriously. I’d be all over wanting to take credit for killing this thing.

She really is an idiot.
 
Written By: shark
URL: http://
...Over 700 miles of fence were authorized and funded last year. 2 miles have been partially built.

Why in the world should the public believe that this new bill (which, btw, cut the amount of fencing almost in half)...
LOL - that must be the single most expensive mile of fencing ever designed.
 
Written By: unaha-closp
URL: http://warisforwinning.blogspot.com/

 
Add Your Comment
  NOTICE: While we don't wish to censor your thoughts, we do blacklist certain terms of profanity or obscenity. This is not to muzzle you, but to ensure that the blog remains work-safe for our readers. If you wish to use profanity, simply insert asterisks (*) where the vowels usually go. Your meaning will still be clear, but our readers will be able to view the blog without worrying that content monitoring will get them in trouble when reading it.
Comments for this entry are closed.
Name:
Email:
URL:
HTML Tools:
Bold Italic Blockquote Hyperlink
Comment:
   
 
Vicious Capitalism

Divider

Buy Dale's Book!
Slackernomics by Dale Franks

Divider

Divider