Meta-Blog

SEARCH QandO

Email:
Jon Henke
Bruce "McQ" McQuain
Dale Franks
Bryan Pick
Billy Hollis
Lance Paddock
MichaelW

BLOGROLL QandO

 
 
Recent Posts
The Ayers Resurrection Tour
Special Friends Get Special Breaks
One Hour
The Hope and Change Express - stalled in the slow lane
Michael Steele New RNC Chairman
Things that make you go "hmmmm"...
Oh yeah, that "rule of law" thing ...
Putting Dollar Signs in Front Of The AGW Hoax
Moving toward a 60 vote majority?
Do As I Say ....
 
 
QandO Newsroom

Newsroom Home Page

US News

US National News
Politics
Business
Science
Technology
Health
Entertainment
Sports
Opinion/Editorial

International News

Top World New
Iraq News
Mideast Conflict

Blogging

Blogpulse Daily Highlights
Daypop Top 40 Links

Regional

Regional News

Publications

News Publications

 
Barry Bonds *
Posted by: McQ on Wednesday, August 08, 2007

Hit number 756

[Yawn]

Says the real home run king:
“I would like to offer my congratulations to Barry Bonds on becoming baseball’s career home run leader,” [Hank]Aaron said. “It is a great accomplishment which requires skill, longevity and determination.
Hank has too much class to add the last reason - steriods. And yeah, I know there's nothing "official" about that, but I have eyes. It will eventually come out.
“Throughout the past century, the home run has held a special place in baseball and I have been privileged to hold this record for 33 of those years. I move over now and offer my best wishes to Barry and his family on this historical achievement. My hope today, as it was on that April evening in 1974, is that the achievement of this record will inspire others to chase their own dreams.”
Just don't do it as Bonds did.
 
TrackBacks
Return to Main Blog Page
 
 

Previous Comments to this Post 

Comments
Congrats. You’ve lowered yourself to the same level of truthiness as Beauchamp and TNR.

Bonds has been under a microscope for years now and if anything could have been proven, MLB would’ve been all over it.

Keep investigating though. There’s a DA in Texas that approves of that method.
 
Written By: Ted
URL: rocketjones.mu.nu
It’s an opinion, Ted. I didn’t advance it as ’the truth’.

In my opinion, based on what I’ve seen, he did something to enhance his performance and, based on what I’ve read, that will soon come out. If so, then he should be stripped of this title. If not, I’ll issue a retraction.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/blog
It isn’t just steroids that have helped Barry Bonds

It offers one great bit of observational evidence to support the article’s assertation...

Namely, it calls to mind Bonds’s performance at Home Run Derbies...
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
The cycling neophyte looks in upon the cycling world and thinks all participants must be dopers - just look at what happened in the Tour de France (Vinokourov, Sinkewitz, Moreni, and Mayo all busted). The cycling fan looks out and sees all other sports turning a blind eye to the problem. I share McQ’s sentiments:
Hit number 756

[Yawn]
Did Bonds dope? Seems I care as little about this as does MLB.

 
Written By: bains
URL: http://
Would Hank Aaron have captured the record against the juiced up pitchers Barry Bonds has had to face?
 
Written By: unaha-closp
URL: http://
Please.

Hank set his record not only without steroids, but playing for a team that had NO ONE else to threaten... Pitchers could wakl Hank without ANY fear of him getting brought home...

If you were to go back and juice up Hank, he’d have hit 1,000 without effort.
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
There is an upside to all this. It reminds those of us who’ve forgotten about Hank Aaron. I was too young to understand the kind of abuse Aaron had to withstand back when he was pursuing The Babe’s record.

Now that I do, I know how much of a class act Aaron was and continues to be. Like I said, it’s nice to be reminded of that.

Oh, be reminded how every generation reacts to the current one surpassing a classic record (the mound was higher/lower, they changed the ball, bats were different back then...).
 
Written By: Strick
URL: http://
Someone should do some research on the "walking" thing. Hank was very rarely walked intentionally, nor was anyone in that era...baseball had some honor back then and hitters were pitched at and NOT intentionally walked. When it happened FANS booed louder than those that boo Bonds today. Giving batters a pass truly did not come into regularity until much later.
Bonds 500+steals 756 HR and public approval by Aaron= enough for me!Does baseball elite call into question the single season HR races that saved baseball (Sosa/McGuire)? NO because it brought fans back and benefited the game, if the Bonds record in baseballs mind were to benefit the game they would be endorsing the hell out of it and putting the stamp of approval on it as they did with the single season record.
 
Written By: J.Scott
URL: http://
Aaron only gave public approval because he’s WAY to classy to say "That cheating POS..."
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
I mention at my own place this morning, a link between this and the Beauchamp thing:
The people who engaged in the “piling on”, as Rick describes it, are average Americans, just Joe and Jane Lunchbox, who are reacting, I think correctly, to being lied to. In my view, the larger the numbers of individuals screaming, (Note the wording) the more the perception gets out there, that “hey, perhaps this does matter”. Which in turn effectively counters the nutty professor and his ilk, and their claims that ‘it doesn’t matter”.
The reaction to this bit with Barry Bonds, is largely the same. The American people have (correctly) identified this as a lie, and are reacting accordingly.

Another parallel; notice where I said in my note to Billy:
As an aside, I would further suggest that their not being pundits, and their not being news people, is in addition to their credibility, not a subtraction from it, but then again, that’s just me.
A similar situation is occurring here. The sports Pundits are forced by a number of pressures, to be heaping praises on Barry Bonds. Those same pressures force them to ignore the fact that the whole thing is a chemically induced lie. Whereas, the American people for the most part have correctly identified it as a large mound of cattle feces and are so reacting.
 
Written By: Bithead
URL: http://bitsblog.florack.us
Like it or not, any future player will have to beat Bonds’ record.
 
Written By: Neo
URL: http://
Ted, Bonds has already admitted to using the products from BALCO, which are known to be illegal. They are in jail, you know. He merely claims ignorance about what he was ingesting. There is no actual doubt that he has been juiced for years.
 
Written By: Phil Smith
URL: http://
Well, I dissent, radically, from the idea that Bonds’ accomplishment is the result of steroid use, even if he was in fact using steroids. I wrote about it this morning and I’ll quote some of that here:

But I do have enough respect for the art of hitting a baseball to be certain that hitting .370, as Bonds did in 2002 at the age of 37, is not something you can get out of a bottle of steroids. Rather, it requires a mastery of hitting mechanics, timing, and mental discipline. In the two following seasons, at ages 38 and 39, Bonds hit .341 and .362. In the 2001 season, when Bonds hit the single-season record 73 home runs at age 36, his batting average was .328.

In those four seasons, 2001 through 2004, ages 36 through 39, Bonds struck out 93 times in 2001, followed by 47, 58, and 41 strikeouts the next three seasons. By contrast, during those years he walked 177, 198, 148, and 232 times. What I’m getting at here is that this is not the result of “muscle bulk,” but is the result of a mature mastery of the art of hitting the baseball. Bonds won the National League MVP award all four of those seasons.

As to the matter of Bonds’ power numbers, specifically his home runs, the 73 he hit in 2001 was never approached again. In fact, he never hit 50 [before or] again. But look at Bonds’ discipline at the plate, measured by the number of times he walks. This is indicative of a pronounced ability to wait for his pitch, meaning in this case getting a pitch that he can drive.

I would argue that Bonds had in fact mastered the art of hitting the home run, which was the product of mastering the art of hitting. He was simply refusing to swing at the pitcher’s pitch and had the discipline and patience to get his pitch, recognize it when he got it, and drive it. If someone wants to claim that steroids can do all that, I want to get me some of them steroids. But of course they cannot do all that.

Barry Bonds is the product of lifelong, almost from the time he could walk, training in baseball. His father Bobby Bonds and godfather Willie Mays were instrumental in that training. Bobby was a very good hitter, and Willie is possibly the greatest baseball player of all time. In fact, it was Willie who counselled Barry that he needed to cultivate his home run stroke. And he did that, with the kind of selectivity at the plate that would have made Ted Williams blush. Again, that ain’t steroids.

So, I respectfully dissent from the negative appraisal of Bonds by Billy Beck, whose opinion on such matters must always be considered.

The “purity” of the game of major league baseball is the pure challenge of getting there in the first place and then staying there. It consists, for a hitter, of what we call in America “stepping up to the plate,” where muscled experts in the art of pitching the baseball throw a fantastic array of fastballs, curves, sliders, splitters and, yes, “spitters” (coming at the hitter with a variety of substances and scratches to make them all the more impossible to hit). In all of that challenge, in both directions, is the purity of the game, and all the drunks and drug takers and lunatics and cheaters along with all the perfect gentlemen and intellectuals who played the game knew that, too.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
But I do have enough respect for the art of hitting a baseball to be certain that hitting .370, as Bonds did in 2002 at the age of 37, is not something you can get out of a bottle of steroids. Rather, it requires a mastery of hitting mechanics, timing, and mental discipline. In the two following seasons, at ages 38 and 39, Bonds hit .341 and .362. In the 2001 season, when Bonds hit the single-season record 73 home runs at age 36, his batting average was .328
You’re incorrect.

Steroids allow him to swing the bat harder and faster, increasing the chance he’ll hit th ball.

In addition to the drugs, his "Arm protection" allows him to not only crowd the plate (allowing him to reach the outside corner where so many pichers live), and it’s design allows him to have a VERY consistant swing, and aids mechanically in the swing (pivot points and timing). It’s the reasson he has such an amazingly consistant swing.

Watch him swing while wearing it, and then watch him at a home-run derby. His swing gets REALLY sloppy in the derbies, because he doesn’t wear the protection (leading to a LOT of topspin line-drives, and lots of popups, but fewer home runs).

He’s cheated. Plain and simple. And for that, he should get his home run total zeroed the SECOND he’s conviced of steroid use.
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
Bonds is an egocentric, arrogant, somewhat crazy person. I’m not a person who likes Bonds, the person, very much. That said, it’s somewhat simplistic and silly to claim that steriods and some magical arm band are the secrets to Bonds success.

His swing is compact and powerful and has been that way for a long, long time. He’s had some of the best coaching from the time he was old enough to pick up a ball. He reads pitchers as if he were a mind reader, and is extremely patient in waiting for ’the pitch’, and claims to be able to read a pitch before it’s left the pitchers hand.

But yea, he’s a cheater. I Thought we lived in the land of ’innocent until proven guilty’, myself. Of course he’s never been proven guilty of anything, yet, so all this ’trial by media’ and since the Court of Public opinion have already proclaimed him guilty, I suppose that is that.

Rumors that he’s going to be ’convicted of this or that’ have been out for years, and nothing has ever become of any of it. One almost wonders if some people aren’t just jealous. 99% of it is just speculation and innuendo, both steroid use and his super-sekret-armband.

We’ll see.
 
Written By: Buddy
URL: http://
Scott Jacobs writes:
Steroids allow him to swing the bat harder and faster, increasing the chance he’ll hit th ball.
Swinging harder and faster does not increase the chances that a batter will hit a ball. The harder and faster a batter swings increases the chances of missing the ball, witness the fantastic strike-out totals of sluggers like Mickey Mantle and Reggie Jackson.

Bonds’ most important attribute as a hitter is his selectivity at the plate, which means the patience and discipline to wait for a pitch that is good for hitting. This was the philosophy of the great Ted Williams. (Which can in turn be contrasted to the "bad ball" hitters, the most prominent of whom was Yogi Berra.) It’s application by Bonds is attested to by his low number of strikeouts and fantastically high number of walks. He does not, as a matter of habit, swing at bad pitches, which are the bread and butter of the pitchers union.

The greatest hitter of all-time, the lunatic Tyrus Raymond Cobb, kept his hands apart when holding the bat to give himself greater control, and he was a contact hitter, which resulted in his extraordinarily high lifetime average.

As for your assertions about Bonds’ arm protector, well, I seriously doubt even the correlation, let alone the cause and effect, other than the fact that if his elbow isn’t smashed by a pitch his career lasts long enough and he gets enough at-bats to break the record. Barry Bonds is not the hitter he is either because of the arm protector or steroids.

By the time Hank Aaron retired he had about 800 more hits than Bonds. Right now Bonds has 1,000 more walks than Aaron had. That’s a combined result of Bonds selectivity and the unwillingness of teams to pitch to him, and it speaks of an upper limit on the number of home runs any hitter could achieve in a season (or a career) because teams will increasingly pitch around a known threat.

Further, if you take out the year Bonds had 73 homers as an anomaly (he never hit as many as 50 before or after) his career pattern of home runs isn’t all that different than Aaron’s. Aaron got into the 40 or more category earlier, and did it about eight times (never hit 50). Bonds also did it about eight times (hit over 50 once).

One of the key differences is that Aaron rarely hit for the super-high average that Bonds got to as Bonds became more selective at the plate. Hitting instruction and philosophy has gotten more sophisticated, I think, although Ted Williams was ahead of his time as a power guy with a systematic approach. (Babe Ruth was from another planet.)

Finally, there has always been "cheating" in baseball, which is not to say that everyone does it, or that it’s to be lauded. But if steroid use was rampant in the big leagues during the last couple of decades, then are we saying that Bonds was taking superior steroids that enabled him to win four of his seven MVP awards in a row? I don’t think so.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
I Thought we lived in the land of ’innocent until proven guilty’, myself.
Uh, no ... that pertains to the legal system ... not sports.

And McP:
Finally, there has always been "cheating" in baseball, which is not to say that everyone does it, or that it’s to be lauded.
But that is exactly what the Bonds record does.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/blog
Swinging harder and faster does not increase the chances that a batter will hit a ball. The harder and faster a batter swings increases the chances of missing the ball, witness the fantastic strike-out totals of sluggers like Mickey Mantle and Reggie Jackson.
Funny... That statement is directly refuted by several baseball players. When you swing faster, you are able to get your bat infront of the fast ball. The physics and math behind "harder and faster = more hits" is sound.
His swing is compact and powerful and has been that way for a long, long time. He’s had some of the best coaching from the time he was old enough to pick up a ball
Of cource, cheating also helps.

Read taht whole article guys... It isn’t just steroids he’s using to cheat.
Finally, there has always been "cheating" in baseball, which is not to say that everyone does it, or that it’s to be lauded.
So if someone wants to cheat, who are we to stop them, right?

If you don’t stop the KNOWN cheaters, how will you EVER have the credability to stop ANY cheater?
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
Baseball will never recover it’s old glory so long as people like this are involved with the game.
 
Written By: Bithead
URL: http://bitsblog.florack.us
P.S.

There is a situation where I suspect a top player in another sport is using steroids in an environment where there is little evidence that other players in that sport are doing the same. The player in question frequently disappears from competition with injuries and then reappears with about twice the muscle of opponents and plays with great success and then disappears for another period. But no one appears to be willing to say anything about it. That could be because I’m simply misreading what I’m seeing. I think that steroids in that situation would really make a difference.

In baseball, the changing fortunes of the home run, its occurrence rising and falling, could be related to steroids or it could be related to better strength conditioning, better hitting instruction, livelier balls and bats, and thinner pitching that in turn spurs the market for pitchers, better pitching instruction, and adaptation.

Baseball is simply a very extremely awfully hard game to play at the major league level, and there is probably a bell curve hiding somewhere that would show steroid users failing and succeeding about in relation to the low and high end of their actual talent. If someone wants to argue that steroids are bad for the image of the game and the impact that has on kids, I’m with you on that, but as to the in-play integrity of the game, that, I’m afraid, is strictly a matter between pitchers and hitters. (And fielders, et al.)
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
Baseball is simply a very extremely awfully hard game to play at the major league level, and there is probably a bell curve hiding somewhere that would show steroid users failing and succeeding about in relation to the low and high end of their actual talent. If someone wants to argue that steroids are bad for the image of the game and the impact that has on kids, I’m with you on that, but as to the in-play integrity of the game, that, I’m afraid, is strictly a matter between pitchers and hitters.
Yeah, rules ... phaa. Who needs rules? Cheating? Who cares, right? Screw the guys who respect the integrity and traditions of the game. Do what you need to do. The ends - homerun king* - justify the means.

Excuse me while I cork my bat.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/blog
Scott Jacobs writes:
Funny... That statement is directly refuted by several baseball players. When you swing faster, you are able to get your bat infront of the fast ball. The physics and math behind "harder and faster = more hits" is sound.
A minumum ability to get bat on ball is a pre-requisite for big league hitters. Swinging "faster and harder" in that context does not make you a better hitter. Having a quick bat is good, and knowing how to hit is even better. Having the clarity and calmness of mind to face big league pitching is even more important.

But the examples of the greatest hit-getters of all time — Pete Rose and Ty Cobb — does not show swinging "faster and harder" to be the formula. They were contact hitters who specialized in getting bat on ball.

Sluggers, on the other hand, by definition take bigger and faster swings and miss the ball more often.

A few select members of that guild — DiMaggio, Williams, Bonds — master the art of selectivity, again, waiting for pitches made for hitting. But no one (who I can think of at the moment) walked the way Bonds does but Ruth himself.

A good example of a contemporary hitter who is not a slugger and does not aspire to "harder/faster" is New York’s Derek Jeter, who is making his way toward 3,000 hits as a master of the inside/out swing, which is a deliberate slowing down and angling back of the bat by wrist action that takes inside pitches to the opposite field.
So if someone wants to cheat, who are we to stop them, right?
Well, Gaylord Perry cheated. Is it O.K. because he was a pitcher and it "only involved" doctoring the baseball? Whitey Ford extended his career a few years by doctoring the baseball. Both he hand Perry are in the Hall.

Ty Cobb used to "slide" into bases spikes first, about two feet off the ground. His opponents were terrified of him and did everything possible during games against him so as not to rile up his homicidal impulses. And so were the fans terrified. Cobb once went into the stands and beat the hell out of disabled man who heckled him. Was trying to maim opponents with his spikes cheating?

Pete Rose and many players from his era took amphetamines, or "greenies" as they were affectionately known.

Is throwing at batter’s heads cheating? Because Hall of Famer Don Drysdale was famous for it. Throwing at hitters is called "part of the game."

I think that in baseball you are always playing in your era, even if your records are naturally compared to other eras. It’s been, what, nearly 70 years since the last .400 hitter. Surely, steroids should have worked their magic and faster harder bats would put as many hitters over that mark as they supposedly did with the 50 home run mark.

But the gloves are better! Is that cheating? The bullpens are deeper and starters don’t pitch more than six innings before they bring in the fresh arms. Is that cheating?

I mean there are so many things going on, all the time. How about stealing the other team’s signs? Willie Mays did it all the time. Cheating?

Fine. Let’s test everyone for steroids, and level that playing field, and get on to the next thing that half or more of the players do to gain an advantage in an impossibly and ridiculously hard game to play.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
McQ writes:
Yeah, rules ... phaa. Who needs rules? Cheating? Who cares, right? Screw the guys who respect the integrity and traditions of the game. Do what you need to do. The ends - homerun king* - justify the means.

Excuse me while I cork my bat
.

Well, you make a good point about rules. Steroids are bad for the image of baseball, but compared to that roughly twenty year period when umpires routinely called pitches above belt-high balls, when they were in fact well within the strike zone described in the rules, steroids never bothered me at all.

The fact that there was a convention for balls and strikes maintained by umpires outside of the strike zone as established by the rules never ceased to irritate me. I think that had something to do with giving hitters a better chance because that’s what the fans wanted. I believe that finally got adjusted a few years back, but all those years nobody seemed too concerned with it.

All I’m saying about Barry Bonds is that he is a great hitter with or without steroids. Steroids didn’t let him lay off a pitch that he could do anything with and make him wait for and recognize one that he could drive. That’s discipline as talent and talent as discipline.

Suppose there were two Barry Bonds (the Bonds twins) and one got steroids and the other got a placebo. What do you think the odds are that the one getting the placebo would do just as well or better than the one who got the steroids?

And would the placebo constitute cheating because it required intent and belief that one was cheating? I ask because it’s possible that the only thing that steroids did for Bonds was give him more confidence. While he is a fundamentally more disciplined hitter than Hank Aaron was their home run numbers, as I mentioned earlier, are not that substantially different on a season-by-season basis. Hank was more anxious to take his swings, and opposing teams were less inclined to pitch around him, so he walked far less than Bonds. Physically, they are about the same height. Bonds is a little taller and instead of remaining taut the way Hank did, Bonds bulked up, but speaking for myself its not much different than the transition that I went through from my 20s to my 30s, when I went from about 180 up to 220, and I had a great deal more strength at 220 than I did at 180.

So, a great deal more might be getting attributed to Bonds’ use of some steroid cream than really mattered to his performance. And I’m not prepared to say that it meant more discredit to the game or Bonds than umpires downsizing the official strike zone to help hitters, probably as matter of unwritten major league policy.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
All I’m saying about Barry Bonds is that he is a great hitter with or without steroids.
Maybe. But he’ll always be an asterisk in my book because of them.
 
Written By: McQ
URL: http://www.qando.net/blog
Eric writes:
Baseball will never recover it’s old glory so long as people like this are involved with the game.
Three things about that:

1. Baseball has never been more popular. Attendance at major league games is setting records.

2. If it’s true that steroid use was common during late-80s, the 90’s, and up to very near the present, then "people like this" were essentially some of the best players of that era. I’m not going to condemn an entire era. If MLB wants to eliminate steroids once and for all, good for it. Let’s get them out of the game, but I refuse to condemn an entire generation of players. Or witch hunt down those who were the most obvious offenders.

That would be like going back to the 1950s and writing off all the alcoholics in the big leagues, you know, because they could be retroactively a bad influence on the kids.

3. If anyone out there wants to do something to restore the game’s old glory, then let’s begin a campaign to stop the endless wrenching nauseating mind-bending blasting music that is played at virtually any interval (like between pitches) at big league ballparks. That is the most sickening thing about the game today.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
McQ writes in response to my comment:
"All I’m saying about Barry Bonds is that he is a great hitter with or without steroids."

Maybe. But he’ll always be an asterisk in my book because of them.
Fair enough. I wish that we’d never heard of steroid use in professional sports. Or amateur sports. I remember the pathetic Ben Johnson losing his Olympic Gold in the 100 meters because he tested positive for performance drugs. I knew it the first time I saw him, with those characteristic circles around his eyes.

Major League baseball is of a different ilk than tennis or track and field. Baseball is a barroom kind of game. It’s like standing up and letting the knife thrower put one by your ear. There are 100 different things going on at once, both between the batter and pitcher and the pitcher and the catcher, the fielders, the managers and coaches on both teams, that I just don’t think steroids can possibly help you with. Maybe Xanax would be a better choice (that’s a joke). As Yogi might have said, half the game is 90% mental.

I’m willing to cut Bonds a break, and then watch A-Rod make his way toward the record over the next decade. It’s too tough a game to make one man a scapegoat for the era he played in.
 
Written By: Martin McPhillips
URL: http://mcphillips.blogspot.com/
All I’m saying about Barry Bonds is that he is a great hitter with or without steroids
How do you know?

Hitter, maybe...

NEAR as many home runs? I doubt it.

The fact is, we’ll never know, and for that he should not only have his home run count voided, but be barred from the Hall of Fame forever.
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
1. Baseball has never been more popular. Attendance at major league games is setting records.
Not when considered on a percentage of the total population.
2. If it’s true that steroid use was common during late-80s, the 90’s, and up to very near the present, then "people like this" were essentially some of the best players of that era. I’m not going to condemn an entire era. If MLB wants to eliminate steroids once and for all, good for it. Let’s get them out of the game, but I refuse to condemn an entire generation of players. Or witch hunt down those who were the most obvious offenders.
Frankly that’s the problem of MLB’s own making. no matter what they do, now, because of the amount of had turned in a been doing over the last couple of decades, they don’t have a level playing field, anymore. Particularly, historically.
3. If anyone out there wants to do something to restore the game’s old glory, then let’s begin a campaign to stop the endless wrenching nauseating mind-bending blasting music that is played at virtually any interval (like between pitches) at big league ballparks. That is the most sickening thing about the game today.
That’s what I can see going either way. Bainbridge commented earlier today that baseball is likely the most boring game ever invented, and so I expect he would comment that the music was a brief respite from the boredom. As to the volume level inside the stadium, you clearly have ever been to a national look Ross league game. (Sigh)... Or at Ralph Wilson Stadium, for that matter. Just so you know, they employ noise making as a cure for being cold. I have personally measured 110 db sound pressure levels in that stadium.
It’s too tough a game to make one man a scapegoat for the era he played in.


Trouble is, giving him or anybody else a pass, means that we’re not taking changing the situation seriously at all.

By the way, Martin, I do believe this is the first even minor disagreement that you and I have had... I don’t know why I bring that up, really... just struck me as interesting.


 
Written By: Bithead
URL: http://bitsblog.florack.us

 
Add Your Comment
  NOTICE: While we don't wish to censor your thoughts, we do blacklist certain terms of profanity or obscenity. This is not to muzzle you, but to ensure that the blog remains work-safe for our readers. If you wish to use profanity, simply insert asterisks (*) where the vowels usually go. Your meaning will still be clear, but our readers will be able to view the blog without worrying that content monitoring will get them in trouble when reading it.
Comments for this entry are closed.
Name:
Email:
URL:
HTML Tools:
Bold Italic Blockquote Hyperlink
Comment:
   
 
Vicious Capitalism

Divider

Buy Dale's Book!
Slackernomics by Dale Franks

Divider

Divider