Meta-Blog

SEARCH QandO

Email:
Jon Henke
Bruce "McQ" McQuain
Dale Franks
Bryan Pick
Billy Hollis
Lance Paddock
MichaelW

BLOGROLL QandO

 
 
Recent Posts
The Ayers Resurrection Tour
Special Friends Get Special Breaks
One Hour
The Hope and Change Express - stalled in the slow lane
Michael Steele New RNC Chairman
Things that make you go "hmmmm"...
Oh yeah, that "rule of law" thing ...
Putting Dollar Signs in Front Of The AGW Hoax
Moving toward a 60 vote majority?
Do As I Say ....
 
 
QandO Newsroom

Newsroom Home Page

US News

US National News
Politics
Business
Science
Technology
Health
Entertainment
Sports
Opinion/Editorial

International News

Top World New
Iraq News
Mideast Conflict

Blogging

Blogpulse Daily Highlights
Daypop Top 40 Links

Regional

Regional News

Publications

News Publications

 
Venezuela’s Orwellian descent into totalitarianism continues apace
Posted by: McQ on Friday, March 21, 2008

Hugo is now attacking the last major broadcast outlet that is critical of his administration:
President Hugo Chávez is trying to whip up public support to close down Globovision, the remaining Venezuelan television channel critical of his administration.

Chávez has called Globovision "an enemy of the Venezuelan people," and fervent government supporters want the national tax office to investigate the station. Hundreds of them rallied outside of Globovision last month.

The threats against Globovision come less than a year after Chávez knocked RCTV, the country's most popular television station, off the commercial airwaves. RCTV had broadcast unflattering news coverage of Chávez for years.
Chavez has run into a few obstacles to his attempt to become president for life, such as losing a referendum which would have enabled him to do so. Part of the reason is Globovision.

So the obvious strategy is to do to it what he was successful in doing to RCTV.
Outside observers say that silencing Globovision would give the president near-complete control over television news coverage.
And it also means that there would be no critical coverage of his further attempts to increase his power over Venezuela. His and only his side of the story would be available.

Some think he wouldn't do that because there is some benefit for Chavez to leaving Globovision on the air:
"We're kind of a trophy for the government to say that there is freedom of expression in Venezuela," [Globovison part-owner Alberto] Ravell said in his office.
And then there are the polls. Some polls are showing Chavez's popularity slipping to near Bush levels:
The pollster Datos, in a quarterly survey of 2,000 Venezuelans last month, found that some 34 percent said they support Chávez's government, down from a high of 67 percent in early 2005, and the lowest level since 2003, the Associated Press reported.

Another survey, by Venezuelan pollster Alfredo Keller, found that 37 percent of Venezuelans queried identified themselves as Chávez supporters in February, down from 50 percent in mid-2007, AP reported.
Those numbers bring another question to the fore - can his slipping popularity stand the risk shutting down Globovision would bring?

Maybe, with the possibility such a move might see him eventually forced from power, going after Globovision might be a blessing in disguise. We should encourage him. I'm sure if he had to leave the country hastily after attempting such a move, his pal in Iran would find a nice villa for the wannabe dictator to wile away his remaining years in comfortable exile. And I'm also sure a free Venezuela would would be happy thank Iran for that.
 
TrackBacks
Return to Main Blog Page
 
 

Previous Comments to this Post 

Comments
But, everyday is a workers paradise in Venezuela...

So, anyone who says differently is just a propagandist for those Imperial bastards from the US.

And thus, it is justifiable to take away from those internal enemies, everything they own.

****

I don’t think we need to encourage him, he seems to be his (and his countries) own worst enemy.
 
Written By: Keith_Indy
URL: http://asecondhandconjecture.com
The pollster Datos, in a quarterly survey of 2,000 Venezuelans last month, found that some 34 percent said they support Chávez’s government, down from a high of 67 percent in early 2005, and the lowest level since 2003, the Associated Press reported.

Another survey, by Venezuelan pollster Alfredo Keller, found that 37 percent of Venezuelans queried identified themselves as Chávez supporters in February, down from 50 percent in mid-2007, AP reported.
I can’t freaking believe so many people openly stated they DIDN’T support him! I mean, think about it.

How many think that those 36-37 percents are even inflated out of fear?
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
34%?

His approval rating is just slightly higher than Bush’s. (And still higher than Congress’s.)
 
Written By: Steverino
URL: http://
Scott, you’re forgetting that’s there a lot of poor people in Venezuela. That’s where his support comes from. And I mean poor. Not USA style poor. They’re poor. They probably owe their first TV set to Chavez, and aren’t so particular about what they get to watch, as long as they get the fun of watching it.

What’s a sign of trouble for Chavez is that with all those poor people who are his political base, his ratings should be well above what they are now. The not-poor—what we could call here in the US blue collar and above—account for a much smaller proportion of the population than they do here in the US, especially when you take account of the fact that a large number of them have already voted with their feet (ie, emigrated).
 
Written By: kishnevi
URL: http://
Chavez is in the process of running Venezuela’s oil industry into the ground - not a good idea. Oil accounts for 90% of exports, 50% of government revenue and 30% of GDP. After he nationalized the foreign owned oil fields, the skilled labor left and the oil companies filed suit, freezing the Venezuela’s accounts in Western banks. Venezuelans do not need a TV station to tell them the Chavez got them in serious trouble.

Before the election returns were in last December, the senior military leadership met with Chavez to tell him that they would not use force to suppress public demonstrations. In what looked like a gesture of moderation and respect for public opinion, without the military, he was powerless.

Last Fall at an Iberian Conference, King Juan Carlos of Spain asked Hugo, "Why don’t you Shut Up?"

The King’s words became Venezuela’s top rated ring tone.

 
Written By: Arch
URL: http://
DTe1Bh dfzvtdtfaiek, [url=http://hbvrgkwkgycr.com/]hbvrgkwkgycr[/url], [link=http://ubbgvwrhtfos.com/]ubbgvwrhtfos[/link], http://jsxrzlwdmauv.com/
 
Written By: zwcjoza
URL: http://pomjhruovihe.com/

 
Add Your Comment
  NOTICE: While we don't wish to censor your thoughts, we do blacklist certain terms of profanity or obscenity. This is not to muzzle you, but to ensure that the blog remains work-safe for our readers. If you wish to use profanity, simply insert asterisks (*) where the vowels usually go. Your meaning will still be clear, but our readers will be able to view the blog without worrying that content monitoring will get them in trouble when reading it.
Comments for this entry are closed.
Name:
Email:
URL:
HTML Tools:
Bold Italic Blockquote Hyperlink
Comment:
   
 
Vicious Capitalism

Divider

Buy Dale's Book!
Slackernomics by Dale Franks

Divider

Divider