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10 worst US infrastructure problems
Posted by: McQ on Tuesday, April 08, 2008

Popular Mechanics lists the 10 worst infrastructure problems in the US. One is found in Atlanta. It has been a problem for a long time, but, as usual, little if anything has been done to address it. The irony, of course, is it exacerbates an existing natural problem:
Water shortages aren't limited to the Southwest. When Georgians faced drought last fall, residents of Atlanta pitched in to reduce their consumption, yet as much of 18 percent of the city's water was hemorrhaging through leaking pipes. A similar situation is found throughout the country. Municipal lines running beneath the streets lose massive volumes of water, as do privately owned pipes that carry water to houses and other buildings.
Amazing. A list of all the rest of the problem areas can be found here.
 
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This frustrates me to no end. I went to a county commissioner meeting last week (Forsyth) and raised the issue of water as it related to all the approvals they were handing out for mew developments (an UNBELIEVABLE number of approved permits). Their response... that the tax revenues to be generated were more important than drought related water restrictions. Damn them! They did not let me bring up the following 3 questions, which I’m sure would have received similar answers - Roads? Schools? Sewer? ’Nothing to see here boy, I say, I say, step aside... there’s tax dollars in them thar develupments’.

Idiots! Short sighted at best, criminally negligent at worst. And infrastructure issues to top it off.
 
Written By: meagain
URL: http://
My "favorite" was the New Orleans Canal Locks. "Congress first authorized new locks in 1956. The Army Corps of Engineers finally began the work in 2002". I can’t wait until the government is in charge of my healthcare.
 
Written By: Is
URL: http://
I can’t speak to any of the other problems on the list, but the description of the problem with Lake Okeechobee left out one important aspect.

In light of Katrina and the other six or so hurricanes that crossed Florida in a two year period (at least five of which passed over or very close to the lake) the Corps of Engineers decided to lower the water levels in the lake to guard against a catastrophic collapse. They significantly lowered it, expecting that normal rain fall over the next winter would bring the lake back up to usual levels. Instead, there was barely any rain, and the lake last year went down to a record low level of water—about four feet below normal. Rains in the last few months have brought that up by about a foot, but the lake—which is actually the main water supply for most of South Florida because of its relation to the Everglades and the South Florida Aquifer—is still roughly three feet below its normal level for this time of year. A hurricane that passed directly over the lake would be very welcome right about now.

And of course our water problems in South Florida are made worse by exactly the same attitudes as meagain observed
 
Written By: kishnevi
URL: http://
They significantly lowered it, expecting that normal rain fall over the next winter would bring the lake back up to usual levels
Change the names kishnevi and you’ve got a similar situation here in GA. They have some asinine set of rules that says ’regardless of how much water is coming in to Lake Lanier, X amount must come out’. Leaving us 20 or so feet below where we should be, and leaving us hoping that hurricane heads due north after filling you guys up.

Government - I think we should let them take over health care. That would certainly eliminate the overpopulation problem.
 
Written By: meagain
URL: http://
On the leaky pipes: That’s one way to replenish aquifers! That water isn’t truly lost, it just reenters the cycle.
 
Written By: Larry
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