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About Canadian healthcare
Posted by: McQ on Wednesday, June 25, 2008

IBD brings us up to date on the thinking of one of the founders of the Canadian government health care system.

He apparently found that what critics foretold about such systems was true:
Four decades later, as the chairman of a government committee reviewing Quebec health care this year, Castonguay concluded that the system is in "crisis."

"We thought we could resolve the system's problems by rationing services or injecting massive amounts of new money into it," says Castonguay. But now he prescribes a radical overhaul: "We are proposing to give a greater role to the private sector so that people can exercise freedom of choice."

Castonguay advocates contracting out services to the private sector, going so far as suggesting that public hospitals rent space during off-hours to entrepreneurial doctors. He supports co-pays for patients who want to see physicians. Castonguay, the man who championed public health insurance in Canada, now urges for the legalization of private health insurance.
Meanwhile, here in the US, we seem bound and determined to duplicate their mistake and if I know our government, compound the problem.
"I happen to be a proponent of a single-payer health care program," Obama said back in the 1990s. Last year, Obama told the New Yorker that "if you're starting from scratch, then a single-payer system probably makes sense."
We really can't be stupid enough to try and replicate a failing system can we?

Yes, we can!
 
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Comments
One of my favorite "Bob the Builder" ribs is an LJ avatar that’s a gif...

"Can we fix it?

No, it’s f*cked!"
 
Written By: Scott Jacobs
URL: http://
The real problem with Canada’s health care system is not that it is a single payer, but rather that the ’payer’ doesn’t / won’t spend the money necessary to provide everybody with the level of health care they insist on receiving. The difference between Canada and the United States is that here we have many payers who can’t or won’t spend the money necessary to provide everybody with the level of health care they want to receive. And in both countries, those who don’t get the level of health care they want and at no more of a cost than they’re willing to pay bitch about it.

And that is the inevitable result of the combination of people demanding to know what ails them (diagnosis) and to have fixed whatever is wrong (cure) AND being unwilling /unable to pay for those services (’Sonny, you better run those tests on me, you better fix what you find wrong and don’t you dare think of charging me anything approximating the costs you’ve incurred for doing so’).

Given that, the health care crisis won’t be solved unless and until society decides it no longer wants or needs quality health care, or until someone figures out a way of both exponentially increasing the output of medical care and at a fraction of the going rate... in other words, this problem ain’t getting solved.
 
Written By: steve sturm
URL: www.thoughtsonline.blogspot.com
"Given that, the health care crisis won’t be solved unless and until society decides it no longer wants or needs quality health care, or until someone figures out a way of both exponentially increasing the output of medical care and at a fraction of the going rate... in other words, this problem ain’t getting solved."

Hmmmm, limited resources available, but a high demand. What system do you think will alleviate this problem, a state-planned system or a free market where pricing sends signals that help people make rational consumption and investment decisions?

 
Written By: Harun
URL: http://
p.s. You can have a completely free market system, but help poor people by transferring money directly to them rather than attempting to ration healthcare to one and to all in an attempt to be "fair." (This is to get around the complaint that a free market will be cold-hearted.)
 
Written By: Harun
URL: http://
figures out a way of both exponentially increasing the output of medical care and at a fraction of the going rate
deregulate
 
Written By: Is
URL: http://
In Ireland where the "Celtic Tiger" is begining to slow, the government announced that they will be freezing new hires and yes, cutting jobs in the health care sector. When things start to get tough for government,the first thing they cut is health care. But that would never happen in America if The Obama is elected,he’ll just raise taxes. No?
 
Written By: firefirefire
URL: http://

 
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