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D8 to the G8 - drop the biofuel mandates
Posted by: McQ on Tuesday, July 08, 2008

While the G8 is meeting and discussing the world's problems, the D8 is also meeting and having its say.

The D8 is comprised of Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan and Turkey. And what are they saying?

Well for one thing, drop the biofuel mandates:
Abdullah Badawi, the Malaysian prime minister, said the use of arable land for biofuels “should be stopped because such action will deepen the global food scarcity and further drive up food prices”.

“We must not allow the zeal for energy security to come into direct conflict with the basic need for food production.”
As for fossil fuels? Well, the basic message from the D8 is let's not get carried away:
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, the Indonesian president, blamed “some developed countries” for exacerbating the food crisis by allowing biofuel development on arable land.

“The idea is to reduce greenhouse gases and to wean themselves away from dependence on fossil fuels,” he said in his speech. “It is not a good idea: it has only worsened the global food crisis.”
Said another way, let's put together a reasonable short-term plan to weather the present energy crisis and increase supply (i.e. drill for more oil) instead of diverting food crops for fuel. Then we can look for a long-term solution to global energy demands while we satisfy the short term need without causing the poorest among us to suffer higher food prices.

Where have we heard that before?
 
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How many of those countries are dependant on fossil fuel exports? A quick check shows 4 of them with more than a billion barrels of proven reserves.
 
Written By: anomdebus
URL: http://
Two reactions

1) Mostly wrong in their claim. We grew extra corn because of the anticipated demand of ethanol. That corn would not have been grown if it wasn’t for ethanol and the unanticipated world crop shortfall would still leave us pretty close to the same situation. The world was able to feed itself until this past year. Our ethanol picture has change some, but it not like ethanol was phased in over this past few years, its been phased in for over a decade.

2) But, so what anyway. Some of those countries that are worried about us sacrificing farmland for fuel production need to take it to the oil producers too and ask them what can be done to help the fuel situation. Why should the US be the sink. Forced to absorb massive increases in fuel prices without passing on any repercussions to anyone else.

My last note. Be very careful with what is going on here. They are more than happy to re-inforce an anti-ethanol message if it gets the US to commit to more free and subsidized food handouts. A little political kung fu of using the inertia of a backlash against crops for fuel to impliment new policies and standards with regard to the autonomy of our farmland.
 
Written By: jpm100
URL: http://
On the other hand, if it is causing problems with that bunch of nations, maybe it’s not all bad. Anything that angers them is probably a good thing.
 
Written By: kyleN
URL: http://impudent.blognation.us/blog
let’s put together a reasonable short-term plan to weather the present energy crisis and increase supply (i.e. drill for more oil) instead of diverting food crops for fuel. Then we can While we look for a long-term solution to global energy demands
It seems pretty obvious that some parties would like to create a "corner" on some technologies and some politicians (on a bi-partisan basis) seem to be going out of their way to help them. This only leads to lots of problems and lots of wasted money.
 
Written By: Neo
URL: http://
Interesting
 
Written By: Neo
URL: http://

 
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