Free Markets, Free People

tax the rich


Federal government: It is not a revenue problem, it is a spending problem

Nick Gillespie and Reason do a good job of dispelling the myth that our problem is a revenue problem, the nonsense that always prompts the “tax the rich” mantra.

Taxes aren’t the problem, never have been – it is a spending problem.  We’re spending more than we take in.  Cut that difference and you cut the deficit to nothing.  Cut it enough and you begin to work down the debt.

 

Taxing the rich at a higher rate might make the class warriors on the left feel good, but it does nothing to address the real problem.

Spending addiction – something Michael alludes too below.  What we have are the addicted trying to handle their own addiction, and essentially their solution has nothing to do with the problem.

Big surprise.

~McQ


Tax The Rich? Watch The Inevitable Happen

Many states have decided the financial relief they need to make up for their profligate spending sprees of the recent past and their present budget short-falls is to be found in raising the taxes of their “rich” citizens.

With states facing nearly $100 billion in combined budget deficits this year, we’re seeing more governors than ever proposing the Barack Obama solution to balancing the budget: Soak the rich. Lawmakers in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York and Oregon want to raise income tax rates on the top 1% or 2% or 5% of their citizens. New Illinois Gov. Patrick Quinn wants a 50% increase in the income tax rate on the wealthy because this is the “fair” way to close his state’s gaping deficit.

But there’s a problem with the plan. As the WSJ points out, these citizens and their money are mobile and while they may prefer to live in the states listed above, they simply don’t have too. And with the plan to significantly increase taxation for them, now there’s a good reason not too:

The tax differential between low-tax and high-tax states is widening, meaning that a relocation from high-tax California or Ohio, to no-income tax Texas or Tennessee, is all the more financially profitable both in terms of lower tax bills and more job opportunities.

Updating some research from Richard Vedder of Ohio University, we found that from 1998 to 2007, more than 1,100 people every day including Sundays and holidays moved from the nine highest income-tax states such as California, New Jersey, New York and Ohio and relocated mostly to the nine tax-haven states with no income tax, including Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire and Texas. We also found that over these same years the no-income tax states created 89% more jobs and had 32% faster personal income growth than their high-tax counterparts.

Notice that the exodus from the high-tax states to low-tax states with more opportunity has been significant since 1998. But now with the plan to increase taxes again on the “richer”, high-tax states are providing even more of a financial incentive for those in higher income brackets to leave them and move to low or no-income tax states. While such a relocation might have had marginally positive financial results for those leaving in the past, high-tax states are about to make relocation for financial reasons a no-brainer. And states like California and New York can hardly afford to run off the class of tax payer that presently pays the largest percentage of state taxes.  But, with alternatives available, that’s precisely what they’re getting ready to do.

And when that happens, who ends up making up for the state’s shortfall?

More recently, Barry W. Poulson of the University of Colorado last year examined many factors that explain why some states grew richer than others from 1964 to 2004 and found “a significant negative impact of higher marginal tax rates on state economic growth.” In other words, soaking the rich doesn’t work. To the contrary, middle-class workers end up taking the hit.

Heh … what a surprise.

~McQ