Free Markets, Free People

Arkansas

Because the state has decided your frying pan grease is its business

It is almost impossible to come up with the implausible scenarios that somehow regularly find their way to light when government is involved:

State Rep. Kathy Webb is seeking to have Arkansas declare a state of emergency due to people failing to scrape grease from their dishes or trap the grease in special grease collectors before washing the dishes in dishwashers or the kitchen sink.

Webb has submitted Interim Study Proposal 2011-201, an act “to declare an emergency” over the alleged crisis. Frying hamburgers is now The People’s Business of the Highest Order.

Webb’s bill claims food grease presents an emergency risk of sewer overflows that threatens the environment. “It is in the public interest to establish a Fat, Oil, and Grease Advisory Committee to study the recommended measures to better ensure that the collection, transportation, disposal, and recycling of fat, oil, and grease are done in a manner that is protective of the environment,” reads the bill.

Anyone want to guess what party Ms. Webb calls her own?

An emergency because of a grease “crisis”.  Damn people, who have been doing this for hundreds of years, have finally driven the state of Arkansas to the brink of Greaseageddon.  The environment is threatened because the sewers might, uh, probably will, uh, definitely will overflow if the state doesn’t step in and regulate it.

No.  Really.  She means it.  Gotta have state mandated “special grease collectors” so all that nasty grease can be collected before it hits those sewers.  No telling how Arkansas has avoided Greaseageddon  before now.  Thank goodness for Rep. Webb’s foresight (because you know, towns and municipalities would never be able to handle such an emergency)!

So how will government do what has to be done, Ms. Webb?

According to the bill, the state will appoint a 14 (!) member committee “with adequate staff and facilities” to study the frying-pan-grease emergency and recommend legislation, enforcement, and other emergency government action to fight food grease. Even after such action, the committee and its “adequate staff and facilities” will perpetually exist, convene, and soak up taxpayer resources.

Because that’s what government does.  It appoints “Grease Czars”, enthrones them in perpetuity “with adequate staff and facilities” and then wastes taxpayer money trying to enforce unenforceable laws passed by morons.

Forward.

~McQ

Twitter: @McQandO

Down memory lane–there’s nothing more American than the good old cheeseburger

Call this just a weird coincidence, but I happened upon an article in the Houston Chronicle that listed the best 10 burger joints in the US.  And coming in at 10 was “Feltner’s Whatta-burger” in Russellville, Ark.  I followed it to a local link.

I went to school there (Arkansas Tech University) and I worked for Bob Feltner in what was then known only as “The Whatta-burger” (methinks somewhere later on there must have been some sort of legal thing with big burger chain named Whattaburger that caused Bob to stick his last name in front of it).

The honor of being among the best 10 doesn’t surprise me, nor could it go to a more deserving person/family.  Here’s the story:

Feltner’s Whatta-Burger in Russellville rounded out the Houston Chronicle’s top ten list of legendary burger joints this year.

"Well, it doesn’t surprise me. They do have great burgers," said Tim Macks, a customer from Fayetteville.

The restaurant opened its doors for the first time back in 1967. It started with a dream. "This used to be a dirt road out here. He sat in a lawn chair, counted cars, came home and said I’m going to open up a burger place and we thought he was crazy," said Missy Ellis, an owner.

Ellis now owns the restaurant her father started when she was just a child. She said, "To be chosen as one of the top 10, that is just unbelievable and I know he’s looking down from Heaven saying way to go."

If it is not fresh, it is not served. Food is not frozen at Whatta-Burger.

Even the pickiest eaters can find something they like and in big portions. "Our large fry is a good pound of fries, so you have to be starving to eat one of those by yourself," said Mandy Simons, general manager.

Eaters from Fayetteville, Fort Smith, and even Tulsa make their way to Russellville for a bite of the Whatta-Burger. "We always make it a point to stop here anytime we’re close," said Alan Young, of Tulsa, "We’ve been looking forward to it for two or three weeks."

A better person or a finer boss than Bob Feltner can’t be found (and I’m far from the only one who would say that).  We were a college town and he located his place right on the border of the campus.  You could walk there, and most did.  Bob supported the college and the kids who went there.  

And he hired as many as he could to work there, usually over staffing the place.   His way of helping those of us who usually didn’t have two pennies to rub against each other.  He also extended credit.  Seriously.  His system was to write it on a wooden ice cream spoon and keep the spoons in the cash drawer.  I used to work behind the counter and it wasn’t at all uncommon to hear a student say “put it on my spoon”.  I’d sort through, find  their spoon (there were a bunch) and put the amount on there. 

What was funny about it is rarely, if ever, did Bob have to collect. And when he did, he’s ask someone who was a friend of the person who owed more than he should to mention it to him.   That was it.  That was the sum of his collection effort.   What he did was appreciated and students showed up constantly to pay on or pay off their “spoon”.   I don’t think he was stiffed very often.

There was one thing Bob wouldn’t do – he wouldn’t put anything out that wasn’t fresh.  None of the hamburger was frozen – it was all fresh.  The vegies were cut up the night before (a friend used to do it and said he seemed to always smell like onions).  The fries and the like were frozen, but none of the meat.  It was the primary rule of the house – if it isn’t fresh or doesn’t look fresh it doesn’t go on a burger.  And if you weren’t sure, it didn’t go on a burger.

I could sing this man’s praises forever.  He was just a great person.  He remembered everyone’s name, greeted them like an old lost friend and made you want to come back.  The fact that his food was great was a bonus.  When I first worked there (not long after he opened) it was a walk-in or walk up place.   No seating for dining.  Strictly to go.  Over the years, Bob has added on and now it has a pretty good sized dining area. 

Of course all of this reminds me of a story where my roommate and I got caught up in a Cool Hand Luke moment and bet someone we could eat 20 regular hamburgers at Whattaburger.  I think alcohol was involved. The bet was if we did so, the other guys would pay for them but if we didn’t we had to pay for them.  Well, neither of us could afford 20 hamburgers, but we figured we could eat them. 

Over we went and Bob got into the fun of it and got the burgers ready.  Well, I’m ashamed to say, I made it through 6 or maybe 7.  I figured we were doomed.  But my roomie scarfed down his 10 and the rest of mine.   We won the bet, barely, in the time allotted.  Me?  I became a footnote in Whattaburger history, but my roomie, Denny, became “champ”.  Every time Denny went in the place, Bob would yell out, “what it’ll be, Champ?”

Loved the place, loved the man, loved the whole family.

If you are ever anywhere near Russellville, Arkansas, do yourself a favor and hunt down Feltner’s Whattaburger.  Missy Ellis, mentioned in the article, is Bob’s daughter (and worked at the Whattaburger with us).  Tell her I said “hi” and enjoy a great burger in Bob’s memory.

~McQ

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White House and unions clash over Lincoln

So what lesson should we take from the Blanche Lincoln primary victory last night against Democratic Lt. Governor Bill Halter?

Well a lot of people are divining a lot of things from her win, but the one I’m seeing the most is her victory spelled a defeat for Big Labor. The last count I saw said BL had pumped 10 million buckaroos into the primary fight – and not on Lincoln’s side.

Here’s how it breaks down. Lincoln was President Obama’s candidate. He’s made that clear, he has campaigned for her, he wanted her to win.

Bill Halter was labor’s chosen candidate and had the backing of the AFL-CIO, SEIU, AFSCME and other major unions. Ginormous amounts of union funds were used in an effort to defeat Obama’s candidate — by the left. That’s the point to be made here – this wasn’t opposition by the Tea Party, this was opposition funded by the natural allies of the Democratic party and, supposedly, the White House.

According to Ben Smith at Politico, once it was clear that Lincoln had prevailed, the White House couldn’t wait to make it clear that the unions were on the wrong sheet of political music. Smith said a WH official contacted him, saying:

“Organized labor just flushed $10 million of their members’ money down the toilet on a pointless exercise,” the official said. “If even half that total had been well-targeted and applied in key House races across this country, that could have made a real difference in November.”

In other words, “get with the program boys, and do it how we tell you to do it”.

Message sent, and received:

AFL-CIO spokesman Eddie Vale responds that “labor isn’t an arm of the Democratic Party.”

Yeah, right – at least not for today.

Way to firm up your support with your base Mr. President – apparently they’re good to go as long as they spend their members money the way he wants them too.

~McQ

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