Free Markets, Free People

tea party

A note to RedState.com

I probably should make it clear that while I’m pointing to RedState.com in the title I’m addressing a particular blogger there.   That would be Aaron Gardner who has penned a post entitled “A note to GOProud and other libertarian Tea Partiers”.  The crux of his message is that the appeal by GOProud and other members of the Tea Party  petitioning the new Republican majority in the House not to get wrapped around the social conservative axle but focus on limited government and fiscal sanity isn’t  welcome or appropriate.

As he chooses to put it, these groups have “decided to tell the GOP to put SoCons in the back of the bus”.

Gardner then appoints himself the sole arbiter of what is or isn’t acceptable for the GOP after essentially scolding those who asked the SoCon agenda be secondary to that of the issues that got the GOP elected.

Or to put it another way, as with any successful movement those that had no  part in its success now want to dictate how it will be run.  And in this case, that would be the SoCons.

Gardner then issues this  rather interesting graphic warning.

Let me break this down as simply as I can below the fold.

If we abort this:

gop-pro-life-300x199

Then, this dies with it.:

teaparty4-300x238

Choose … wisely.

 

Huh. Let me see if I can return the favor graphically:

 

The GOP enjoys the majority it now has because of this …

teaparty4-300x238

Without a word about this …

gop-pro-life-300x199

Choice made.

~McQ

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Observations: The QandO Podcast for 07 Nov 10

In this podcast, Bruce and Dale discuss Tuesday’s midterm elections, and Friday’s unemployment report.

The direct link to the podcast can be found here.

Observations

As a reminder, if you are an iTunes user, don’t forget to subscribe to the QandO podcast, Observations, through iTunes. For those of you who don’t have iTunes, you can subscribe at Podcast Alley. And, of course, for you newsreader subscriber types, our podcast RSS Feed is here. For podcasts from 2005 to 2009, they can be accessed through the RSS Archive Feed.

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32 percent of Tea Party candidates win

That’s the title an unbiased news organization would have used to describe the number of Tea Party backed candidates who won.  However, in their endeavor to “lean forward”, MSNBC has given up all claim to objectivity and their title to the story shows it.  “Just 32% of Tea Party candidates win”.

Really – “just” 32%?  So how does that compare to the Netroots effort?

And 32% means what in raw numbers?  Well it means 50% of their Senate candidates won (with one still undecided).  But for a brand new organization, 5 US Senators isn’t bad at all.  It is certainly enough to counter the Snowe/Collins contingent.

While 82 of their Congressional candidates lost, 40 won.  That’s a caucus in anyone’s world, to include the left.  The Blue Dog Caucus was 54. It is more than enough to keep the Tea Party agenda in the fore (assuming they aren’t co-opted as were the Blue Dogs who are now down to about 20 or so left).

So for a leaderless, grassroots organization which just recently emerged, I’d say 32% is pretty phenomenal.

But then, I’m not leaning forward properly I guess.

~McQ

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Observations: The Qando Podcast for 31 Oct 10

In this podcast, Bruce, Michael, and Dale discuss Tuesday’s midterm elections.

The direct link to the podcast can be found here.

Observations

As a reminder, if you are an iTunes user, don’t forget to subscribe to the QandO podcast, Observations, through iTunes. For those of you who don’t have iTunes, you can subscribe at Podcast Alley. And, of course, for you newsreader subscriber types, our podcast RSS Feed is here. For podcasts from 2005 to 2009, they can be accessed through the RSS Archive Feed.

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Observations: The Qando Podcast for 24 Oct 10

In this podcast, Bruce, Michael, and Dale discuss the NAACP’s finding of racism in the Tea Party, and the Tea party in general.

The direct link to the podcast can be found here.

Observations

As a reminder, if you are an iTunes user, don’t forget to subscribe to the QandO podcast, Observations, through iTunes. For those of you who don’t have iTunes, you can subscribe at Podcast Alley. And, of course, for you newsreader subscriber types, our podcast RSS Feed is here. For podcasts from 2005 to 2009, they can be accessed through the RSS Archive Feed.

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As configured Federal Government is not popular with majority population

One of the points I continue to try and make when talking about Democrats, Republicans and elections is that which ever side is on the winning side this time or that, it’s mostly because the populace is more disgusted with the other side than enamored with their side.

The trend in the “are we on the right or wrong track as a country” has been in the negative for many years.  People aren’t happy in general with the direction of the country or how it is being governed in general, regardless of the party in power.

Gallup points to one of primary “specifics” that relate to that feeling – perceptions about the federal government.  And it isn’t pretty reading if you’re a big government fan:

Overall, 72% of responses about the federal government are negative, touching on its inefficiency, size, corruption, and general incompetence, with the most common specific descriptions being "too big," "confused," and "corrupt."

In fact in another recent Gallup poll, the federal government ranked next to last (only above the oil and gas industry which it has constantly demonized) with only 26% of those surveyed seeing it in a positive light.

This is one of the reasons the Tea Parties exist – they are the small minority of activists which vocalize what much of the population feels and is doing its best via the ballot box to correct.  What the TP does is give the issue the visibility it needs.   A voice to the frustration.

What you see in much of Washington DC is a bunch of government “addicts” (i.e. politicians and bureaucrats) in denial. 

I could go on a riff about all of this for thousands of words, but you’ve all read it before.  It is like the 800 pound gorilla in the room that neither party really wants to acknowledge.  Such acknowledgment would mean a) they’d have to actually listen to the people and that means b) giving up the power they’ve accrued to this point.  And in reality, neither party really, honestly wants to do that (oh certainly there are some in each who might be amenable, but not as a whole, no matter what they say). 

The relatively good news is you can tell both parties are worried about this, but for different reasons.  Democrats realize they’re almost completely on the wrong side of this.  They are, at heart, a big government party.  They see government as the primary means of accomplishing what they visualize as a utopian egalitarian society overseen by a large (costly and intrusive) government.  What is beginning to bother them is realizing how few buy into that vision and want it. 

The Republicans, on the other hand, supposedly embody the principles that the frustrated populace mostly embrace.  The problem is performance.  They haven’t lived up to their principles for decades.  That is why you see insurgent candidates running against establishment candidates and doing well.  The insurgents may be colorful and for the most part, not the choice of the establishment, but that’s the point.  However flawed the insurgent candidates are personally, they represent a message to the establishment.  It is about a type of candidate – philosophically.   They’re essentially saying “you count seats, we count principles” and they’re further saying “we’d rather chance losing the seat that putting someone in there that doesn’t represent our needs” because doing otherwise simply hasn’t worked out in the past, has it?

That is,to me at least, one of the more fascinating aspects of what is going on out there.  And these polls that Gallup and others do indicate this isn’t something which is going to be easily or quickly remedied.  However, it should warn both sides that business as usual is not an option.  And while that may manifest itself somewhat in this election, it is the 2012 political season that is going the be one of the most interesting in decades to watch.

~McQ

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How bad is it when a candidate would rather have Gore than Obama?

Ask Kendrick Meek, the Democratic Senate candidate in Florida.  Even the UK’s Telegraph noticed some interesting things, such as Meek never mentioned Obama once at the rally with Gore.

But, then, neither did Gore.

In Tampa, neither Mr Gore nor Mr Meek made direct reference to Mr Obama’s historic health care legislation, his proudest achievement, or the financial bailout. Both measures are unpopular with all but hardcore Democratic supporters.

Two years ago, every Democrat in the country was invoking Mr Obama’s name as they hoped to ride on his coat-tails to electoral victory. This year, he is a near-pariah, with many of the party’s candidates doing everything they can to distance themselves from him.

Gore also came in for a bit of heckling.  When he mentioned “giving in to corporate special interests”, someone in the crowd yelled, “like you!” 

But interestingly most of the people there seemed more nostalgic for Clinton/Gore than Obama/Biden.  Meek called the Clinton/Gore team, "stellar public elected figures who once served and are still giving".  People interviewed while leaving the event seemed resigned to the fact that the Obama administration was probably not long for this world:

"I was thinking that if we could get Clinton back in and Gore back in we might do something in this country," said Robert Henry, 62 a retired soldier. His wife Susan, 59, said that Obama was unlucky because he "got handed an absolute train wreck" while Gore "reminds us of good times, of prosperity and peace".

When the partisans have concluded that the “good times” are no more, support is most likely not going to develop on election day as Obama and the party hope it will.

Meek and Gore were there to rally support for Meek and tell them how well he’s starting to do.  Said Gore, "Kendrick’s going up like a skyrocket", while Marco Rubio is just “bumbling along”.

Rubio leads Meek 46 to 18 in the most recent polls.  Charlie Crist is at 33. 

And a reminder as the media tries to paint all the Tea Party candidates is extremist and out of the main stream – unlikely to win in the general election.  Rubio is the Tea Party pick in FL.

~McQ

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Observations: The QandO Podcast for 12 Sep 10

In this podcast, Bruce, Michael, and Dale discuss Fidel Castro’s reported admission that Cuban economic system doesn’t work, and whether the upcoming election is a mandate for the Republicans, or something else entirely.

The direct link to the podcast can be found here.

Observations

As a reminder, if you are an iTunes user, don’t forget to subscribe to the QandO podcast, Observations, through iTunes. For those of you who don’t have iTunes, you can subscribe at Podcast Alley. And, of course, for you newsreader subscriber types, our podcast RSS Feed is here. For podcasts from 2005 to 2009, they can be accessed through the RSS Archive Feed.

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The bigger story about the Murkowski defeat

You remember Ned Lamont, don’t you?

You don’t?  Well Ned was the posterboy for the Kos Kids effort to change the dynamic within the Democratic party.  They wanted “progressive” candidates and Joe Lieberman of CT just didn’t fit the bill.  So the Kossaks and others like FireDogLake, backed their candidate, raised money and did their best to oust old Joe.  And they had some limited success.  I say limited in that they beat Joe in the Democratic primary, but then independent Joe whipped Ned’s rear in the general election.

Now, it’s not clear that will happen in Alaska.  Rumor has it that Murkowski, sensing defeat to the Tea Party backed Joe Miller, reached out to the Libertarian Party of Alaska, wondering if they’d be willing to adopt her as a candidate.  The libertarians said, “no way, no how, Lisa”.  She might be a viable candidate, but she’s no libertarian.  But that caused some to believe she’ll run now as an independent.

And, in Florida, you see the same sort of scenario being played out with Charlie Crist and the TP backed Marco Rubio.  Crist, the establishment GOP choice has been reduced to running as an independent – and he is.

The whole point of course is getting establishment candidates ousted in a primary is only Step 1.  As Ned Lamont and the Kossaks learned, the important step is Step 2.

If the Tea Party is to be taken seriously as a force for making the GOP more fiscally conservative and Constitutionally aware, it has to win the Step 2 contests as well.

~McQ

Observations: The QandO Podcast for 23 May 10

In this podcast, Bruce, Michael, and Dale discuss Rand Paul, this week’s elections, and the stock market.

The direct link to the podcast can be found here.

Observations

The intro and outro music is Vena Cava by 50 Foot Wave, and is available for free download here.

As a reminder, if you are an iTunes user, don’t forget to subscribe to the QandO podcast, Observations, through iTunes. For those of you who don’t have iTunes, you can subscribe at Podcast Alley. And, of course, for you newsreader subscriber types, our podcast RSS Feed is here. For podcasts from 2005 to 2009, they can be accessed through the RSS Archive Feed.

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